There are newer employer reviews for Aspen Dental
There are newer employer reviews for Aspen Dental

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Helpful (1)

Could be better

  • Work/Life Balance
  • Culture & Values
  • Career Opportunities
  • Comp & Benefits
  • Senior Management
Current Employee - PSR
Current Employee - PSR
Recommends
Neutral Outlook
Approves of CEO

I have been working at Aspen Dental full-time (Less than a year)

Pros

Great dentists, great team. Hours are awesome.

Cons

Not that great of pay. I feel they are not maintained properly.

Advice to Management

hire better management!!!

Other Employee Reviews for Aspen Dental

  1. Helpful (10)

    Associate Dentists Overworked and Underpaid

    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Associate Dentist
    Former Employee - Associate Dentist
    Doesn't Recommend
    No opinion of CEO

    I worked at Aspen Dental full-time (More than a year)

    Pros

    A guaranteed salary for dentist associates is a comforting fallback that you can't get in many private practices. Nice to know there's a guaranteed minimum. Nice to be able to let the company deal with all the business stuff and be able to focus more on clinical. Nice that the contract is not very restrictive in the sense that there is no non-compete clause, and there is no minimum length of contract (they just ask for 90 day notice). It's a chance to gain some great experience with removable prosth--which dental school gives relatively little training in. They offer a nice 1 week of training for new dentists, for which they fly you to Syracuse and wine and dine you. For new dentists who unfortunately have few options, Aspen at least gives you a place to start, and guaranteed salary. Also generally plenty of new patients coming in. Benefits were decent (maybe about $5000 in savings for me per year if i add them all up), but not near enough to make up for my low pay discussed below.

    Cons

    The guaranteed salary was comforting going in, but in the end I was not paid well at all for the amount of work I did. On average dental associates nationally get about 30% of production according to ADA surveys, but I when I did the math I ended up getting about half of that from Aspen Dental. They don't pay based on production or collections. They've invented their own "profit sharing" (kind of a misnomer sice there's really not a lot of profit sharing) system through which you get bonuses on top of your guaranteed salary. But as I said, the bonuses in the end are nowhere near what they should be to give you the average of around 30% of production that most associates get. I suppose if you don't work very hard or produce very much then maybe the guaranteed salary would be a good deal for you. But I worked very hard, and was not rewarded for my efforts. Depending how things worked out with the office on a given month, there were some periods where I produced an average of $4000 per day, and only recieved my daily rate of $450. Do the math, and that's about as low a % of production as you'll find anywhere. For the production I gave them, I literally would have been paid almost double most places (if given 30% of production). The hours end up being quite long--not great for family life. 9 hours a day at the office (including the lunch hour), and that's if you don't arrive 15 minutes early, or get stuck late (which often happens). I'd expect to be at the office 45-48 hours a week rather than a typical 40 hour week. Also, some offices have extended hours, so you'll work at least one evening. In the end I'd see my kids for about an hour before they went to bed is all. I sometimes felt that the system was set up to put me at odds with my hygienist. She made more money if she sold more products (arestins, MI paste, electric toothbrushes, etc) and thereby increased her production, and it created tension if I didn't feel that certain products were necessary and didn't prescribe them. Another con is that if you take every insurance under the sun (as Aspen and many corporate groups do), then you have to work twice as hard to get the same amount of production because they set your fees so low. This is why you end up seeing so many patients per day. I very often didn't feel I had the time I needed to give to patients. I'd fairly regularly have 2-3 other patients to see in the middle of a patients filling appointment because of the overflow schedule for denture steps and the many new patient exams (many of which you do for free). Sometimes it was just crazy, but management doesn't seem interested in trying to control the overflow schedule more. Another con is they weren't anxious to get me supplies I wanted, and I don't think I was very demanding. Mostly I wanted a rotary endo system. Who in the world still does root canals with hand files these days? You can make good money with Aspen--just not as an associate. You'd have to become an MCD or a part owner. Which you can do at some point, but I wasn't willing to deal with the long hours or insane overflow/new-patient schedule. No thanks. One thing is for sure, staying as an associate with Aspen long term is crazy unless you really have no other options for some reason.

    Advice to Management

    Stop building your empire on the backs of young associate dentists. I feel like in a year I basically bought you 1/3rd of a new practice with my hard work that I wasn't rewarded for. Just pay a fair % of production for everyone. If you're "profit sharing," it certainly isn't with associates. I suppose rewarding MCD's well gets at least one doctor in the office to stay, and I suppose that's your strategy, but I wouldn't be comfortable being an MCD partly because I'd know that my associate is getting ripped off and padding my paycheck. Quit paying hygienists more if they sell more products. Constant headache for me. Always felt at odds with my hygienist, and that shouldn't happen. Manage the overflow schedule better. Color code it for each doctor. It isn't reasonable to think that whoever is free can just see the overflow patients. There is too much follow up that requires knowledge of what happened before. Patients get mad, docs get mad. I'd sometimes get 3 patients in a row in the middle of a full mouth surgery. Not cool or safe for my surgery patient. Corporate groups who take every insurance under the sun no matter how crappy the re-imbursement is are gradually ruining the dental field for both patients and docs. I get upset because I have to see twice as many patients and basically be a slave to make the same amount of money. Patients get mad at me because they have to wait forever and I have to rush their treatment all the time. At some point you have to say no to some insurances for the good of everyone.


  2. Helpful (3)

    Patient Service Representative

    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Patient Service Representative in Pittsburgh, PA
    Former Employee - Patient Service Representative in Pittsburgh, PA
    Doesn't Recommend
    No opinion of CEO

    I worked at Aspen Dental full-time (Less than a year)

    Pros

    You learn valuable dental terminology and work with a great team.

    Cons

    Unreasonable amount of time to verify insurance, monitor the daily queue, collect co-pays, answer phones, make patient charts, and greet each patient. Extremely low pay, high stress (this could easily be a two person job).

    Advice to Management

    Take a big look at your employee turn over rate and realize that your home office PSR's need help! The company as a whole needs restructured (It's feels like a Walmart) big corporation with lots of rules and little recognition to it's employees.


There are newer employer reviews for Aspen Dental
There are newer employer reviews for Aspen Dental

See Most Recent

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