There are newer employer reviews for BNY Mellon
There are newer employer reviews for BNY Mellon

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Programmer

  • Work/Life Balance
  • Culture & Values
  • Career Opportunities
  • Comp & Benefits
  • Senior Management
Current Employee - Senior Associate in New York, NY
Current Employee - Senior Associate in New York, NY
Recommends
Neutral Outlook

I have been working at BNY Mellon (More than a year)

Pros

Great place to work and build your career

Cons

to much red tape involved

Advice to Management

listen to others on how to do things

Other Employee Reviews for BNY Mellon

  1. In a limited amount of time I have broadened my scope of experience.

    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Legal Personal in Pittsburgh, PA
    Current Employee - Legal Personal in Pittsburgh, PA
    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook

    I have been working at BNY Mellon full-time (More than a year)

    Pros

    BNY Mellon is not a competitor of retail banks, thus the experience is different then one would gain at a domestic (USA) retail bank. The bank makes an effort to promote diversity and community outreach. The bank streamlines processes rather well.

    Cons

    The workload is stringent and the merit increases are close to nothing. The merging of BNY and Mellon has been slow and appears to have affected the morale of many employees because of the polar opposite corporate cultures.

    Advice to Management

    Involve employees more in daily operations.


  2. Helpful (3)

    A Really Bad Company

    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Vice President in New York, NY
    Current Employee - Vice President in New York, NY
    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I have been working at BNY Mellon full-time (More than 5 years)

    Pros

    Benefits are decent. Pension plan and 401K plan with up to 5% company match. Health benefits were good, but are now deteriorating.

    Cons

    Just some of the worst management that I have ever seen. Senior management is not engaged at all in the day-to-day operation of the company. They are not typically seen and they don't set priorities in any way that describes or affects what line workers, and by line workers, I can mean vice presidents, do or are responsible for. From my vantage point, neither senior or middle management has much understanding of the issues and problems which prevent BNY Mellon from advancing, even in areas where management claims to understand that improvement is necessary. Worse, it seems that they don't want to know or understand the issues. Rather than identification, detailed strategizing on remedies and then contemporaneous management of factors where the company needs to improve, much emphasis is placed on "road shows", events and marketing of fuzzy solutions to employees. While I agree that much needs to be done to lift the spirits of employees, as there is a malaise which exists there among the employees that anything can truly be different, as the bank seems to have been mismanaged for decades, the demeanor of employees will start to change when they see that long-standing problems are finally being recognized, discussed openly, and addressed. Management is content with a "hands-off" strategy, often purchasing software to take the place of contemporaneous management, measuring the wrong things, insane cutbacks in staffing and/or materials or infrastructure. Meaningful education and training is seriously lacking. In technology areas at least, where specific technical knowledge is required, and the field is changing rapidly -- perhaps a good up-to-date technologist needs to gain control of 20-30% new information a year -- training which is meaningful and specific to work that the technologist is responsible for knowing is very difficult to come by, particularly if it must be paid for to an outside party. Yet, much lip service is given to training especially since it was the source of much employee dissatisfaction in previous employee engagement surveys. What has resulted is that the employee is responsible for acquiring 18 hours of training and is rated on it, usually without any serious training budget. This means that he must scrounge free education, seminars, vendor indoctrination, etc., which is not the training that most need. In this sense, management is working against its line technology workers and even against its own long-term interests. Our new president sent an email that they are planning a new education initiative called BNY Mellon University. There were no specifics and no statement of how this university would be different from the current offerings for in-house education. I would think that such an announcement could wait for some details, some framework and some description of what gap the university would fill that the current education offerings lacked.

    Advice to Management

    Direct involvement in the company is more than developing a superficial checklist and checking all the boxes. Recent activities, such as the superficial manner in which results of the employee engagement survey were presented are entirely dissatisfactory and even a step backward from what was established under the previous CEO. A one-page summary of the results obtained from a 50 or so question survey of 45,000 employees and with no true specificity on either the results, nor the conclusions obtained from the results, nor the way forward, is clearly inadequate.


There are newer employer reviews for BNY Mellon
There are newer employer reviews for BNY Mellon

See Most Recent

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