Books-A-Million

www.booksamillion.com
There are newer employer reviews for Books-A-Million

 

Would be an enjoyable job if it were more about selling books and less about selling rewards cards.

  • Comp & Benefits
  • Work/Life Balance
  • Senior Management
  • Culture & Values
  • Career Opportunities
Current Employee - Bookseller in Charlotte, NC
Current Employee - Bookseller in Charlotte, NC

I have been working at Books-A-Million part-time (more than a year)

Pros

Generally stimulating atmosphere, being in a bookstore is always fun. Interesting things to look at, and often intelligent or interesting customers to talk to. Usually good coworkers, who also love books, or at least intelligent types.

Cons

The company will never give you a raise (fact) and they have pretty poor benefits. All the corporation cares about, and therefore all your managers are pressured to care about, is how many rewards cards and magazine subscriptions you get people to sign up for while working at the register. You have to be a salesman to keep this job, and the commissions for what you sell are pretty small.

Doesn't Recommend
Positive Outlook
No opinion of CEO

491 Other Employee Reviews for Books-A-Million (View Most Recent)

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  1.  

    Working at Books-A-Million was an awful experience.

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I have been working at Books-A-Million

    Pros

    Bringing in tips was a nice perk

    Cons

    From corporate all the way down to management, everyone seemed to believe employees were disposable.

    Doesn't Recommend
    No opinion of CEO
  2. 1 person found this helpful  

    A meatgrinder that takes everything and gives nothing back. Company dedicated to burnout.

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - MIT in Birmingham, AL
    Former Employee - MIT in Birmingham, AL

    I worked at Books-A-Million full-time (more than 8 years)

    Pros

    * I made some great lifelong friends here. Some of the employees are truly fantastic people.
    * 30% off Books and you are suppose to be able to borrow books from stores (works half the time if a manager is aware).

    Cons

    Company offers low wages/salaries, below industry averages. No bonuses except for management. Raises are miniscule and rare (1-2% raises possibly every other year if management agrees.. I am not joking.).

    No compensation or overtime for time worked on weekends and time over 40hrs a week. Comptime is offered but management never makes good on comptime promises, there simply isn't enough people to cover hours and new projects ALWAYS take prescedence over comptime. If you have to work extra hours on YOUR time, you can kiss those hours goodbye and you will not be financially compensated as BAM does not pay overtime to their salaried employees.

    Extremely high expectations of workload. Be prepared to work almost every weekend and nights practically everyday and more days on the fly. Thanksgiving and Christmas time are theirs so give those up.. Don't expect holiday bonuses either. There will be none.

    Now about the management.. Excess of management. Ratio of managers to workers is ridiculous. In some departments the ratio is 4 to 1. with as many managers as this company has, projects are poorly run and very little actual project management is actually performed. All Projects are poorly run, planned, executed and managed. Projects run long and no actual project hour projections are done. Many managers do not even understand the projects they manage or what they affect. Documentation is sparse. The majority of projects are reactionary and knee-jerk responses. Most of the time many projects get done because of the few (many cases 1) actual technical person on the project who knows how to coordinate with other departments and do some project management.

    Extreme lack of innovation. AD-HOC implentations will become production. Despite how competitive the book industry has become, there is little innovation in this company. What worked years and decades ago, is still what drives the engine here. No actual leveraging of social media, smartphones, or the like. All implementations are of a very very basic nature. Given this, I am not quite certain how this company will survive. I expect this chain to go the way of Borders because they are not changing with the times, not leveraging new technologies or opportunities like analysing customer loyalty data or using CRM solutions. To this day, the company has no idea of their sales demographics aside from analyzing basic SKU level items. Very very very basic analysis done. you'll think you are back in the 1990s.

    There is little or no investment in employees. No training in new technologies. Prepare to be working on very old and very proprietary systems and find ways to get that system to "function" as desired with little or no actual expense. It sounds innovative but really it's just cheap. The systems you are asked to work on are so old many are EOL (end of life) and technological barries prevent proper interfacing with the tech they want. Company saves money on the bottom line by cutting corners on tech that becomes difficult to grow and expand on (no future planning). It's not innovative, it's cheap.. Example (Win 98 computers still in use)

    The few people left have carved out a nice little political niche. If you do decide to work here, you will quickly find out who the workers are because it is few and far between..

    Bottom line - Be prepared to work Understaffed, underpaid, overworked, and be underappreciated. You will come to hate your job and find you have no time for your family. Stay away.. Your family will thank you and you will thank yourself..

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Cut the fat and get rid of the excess managers. Hire some managers with actual project management experience. Hire technical people who can help you leverage new technologies. pay your people what they are worth if you want to keep them. Invest in your employees.. Your bottom line is not going to be worth much if everyone who is skilled leaves the company.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO
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