Business Wire

  www.businesswire.com
  www.businesswire.com
There are newer employer reviews for Business Wire

1 person found this helpful  

Good place to work..if you're prepared to work through odd expectations.

  • Comp & Benefits
  • Work/Life Balance
  • Senior Management
  • Career Opportunities
Current Employee - Account Executive in Seattle, WA
Current Employee - Account Executive in Seattle, WA

I have been working at Business Wire

Pros

Professional and well versed colleagues, always willing to help.

Cons

Frugality..to the point of it being a hindrance to attain revenue goals/expectations.

Advice to ManagementAdvice

Less focus on running a tight ship and more focus on account planning in specific regions, understanding the business trends of specific regions.

No opinion of CEO

47 Other Employee Reviews for Business Wire (View Most Recent)

Sort: Rating Date
  1. 4 people found this helpful  

    Nice people but poor management and zero staff appreciation -- please think twice before working here!

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Newsroom Editor in London, England (UK)
    Former Employee - Newsroom Editor in London, England (UK)

    I worked at Business Wire full-time (more than an year)

    Pros

    The colleagues in the newsroom, marketing and sales are friendly and helpful. You get a regular wage slip, in the newsroom your hours are set in stone and you don’t have to do overtime. If you do ever decide to do overtime (if short-staffed for example), you get paid for it fair and square. Pay is average and there are some benefit schemes (health, pensions). You work a shift system in the newsroom, which means you have a lot of your day left after an early shift.

    Cons

    Here some info on editor role:
    - The job is quite complex and takes a while to learn (pace and workload vary across the different offices). Once you know what you are doing, the style of work becomes a bit repetitive and mundane, despite continuous deadline pressures. There are little creative or writing skills required.
    - There are not many options for career development —you will have more responsibilities as time goes by, but will essentially do the same kind of work whether you have been in the newsroom one month or five years.
    - No full internet access for ‘security reasons’ for lower rung editors.

    In my opinion, only work here if:
    - you want a stable job with little variation
    - or if you are looking for your first job on the career ladder.

    Where to begin with my cons list?

    Management:
    Top management micromanages to the point of borderline insanity. The company has spread beyond the US shores decades ago and yet US top brass can’t let go and doesn’t comprehend that different offices in different countries have varying workloads, types of clients with different priorities etc.—yet they stubbornly force these offices to tow the main US party line, even if their one-size-fits-all approach may be counterproductive to clients’ needs, undermines the newsroom’s efficiency and possibly even revenue. Tips to the CEO people: Let go a little and use some common sense – listen to the other offices and try some compromise and let them develop their own initiative and office-specific workflow so that things run smoothly . This will help keep your staff (and ultimately your clients) happy.

    Micromanaging and mismanagement also trickles down to the lower rungs of management and supervisors, who sometimes appear ignorant of what their front-of-house people actually have to deal with work-load wise. Work is delegated incessantly and blindly from the top down — to a point where staff are leaving by the bucket load because they have become too exhausted, disheartened and resentful. Management is often authoritative and sometimes incompetent and unprofessional — for example openly discussing potential interview candidates in detail when hiring new staff.

    How about the office vibe?
    Depends on department! Small talk between colleagues in rare quiet phases is (depending on the mood that day) more often than not obviously discouraged by management obsessed with having a tight grip on their work force. With no internet access, staff is therefore left to read instruction manuals in borderline silence.

    Motivation:
    Praise or encouragement is rare, but mistakes are blown out of proportion to a point where you almost feel like you are part of a rather weird Stalinist flavoured tragic comedy play. Many complaints about work conditions are deflected by management and ignored. It is a typical suck-up, kick-down hierarchy that seems very stale and outdated in this day and age.

    Frugality:
    It seems the company has cut corners to a point of austerity that no longer makes sense.
    Here are some examples:
    - There are no proper official training programs in place, neither for supervisors nor editors.
    - Not to mention forcing people to work on hopelessly outdated, unreliable and broken computers in a fast-paced deadline-driven environment for years and years — this is not going to make people want (or allow people) to work harder. An international media company should have the very latest equipment.
    - Staff retention is also not exactly encouraged by the sudden removal of the free teabags and coffee (this measure was the proverbial icing on the cake).

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Training:
    - Give management / supervisors management training and teach them people skills.
    - Introduce consistent media law training for staff at every relevant level of the company, particularly the newsroom, sales and supervisors and sales managers. This is a press wire operating on a global scale – the training most people are getting is much too vague and arbitrary at the moment.
    Staff treatment:
    - Sort out the outdated computers. It is now beyond a joke. Enough said on that topic!
    - Do not take your staff for granted — instead try to give them some positive incentives to stay and strive in your company. Reward those that work hard and who try to keep clients happy. This applies to sales as well as the newsroom staff!
    - Don’t react punitively or defensively if someone dares to make a complaint or even a suggestion
    - Get your priorities straight: if your office is haemorrhaging staff, the trick is to then try and treat your remaining employees better not worse in order to avoid further loss of workers!
    - Smart or ambitious workers are not going to stay in a company that continuously stifles, ignores or belittles any initiative they try to show.
    - Stop patronizing and chiding your employees – you are dealing with educated adults, not with a random bunch of juvenile offenders.
    - Taking sales out to big client events and parties (admittedly, this happens rarely enough as it is) but leaving the newsroom behind without an invite every single time is not going to help motivation levels. Instead, try to arrange opportunities where every work group in the office can get together once in a while (this would help communication and make people feel more positive) — and no, we don’t mean just the Xmas party.
    - Perhaps introduce a system where staff can give anonymous feedback regularly (not just when they leave the company, as that is a bit too little, too late!). Listen to the people working on the front line (in the newsroom and in sales). The editors face the pressure of getting releases out fast and correctly — at the same time, they also have a vast amount of contact with the clients. Hence, their feedback and ideas should be heard to keep the company alive and running smoothly.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO
  2. 6 people found this helpful  

    cheap, unprofessional company

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Newsroom Editor in London, England (UK)
    Current Employee - Newsroom Editor in London, England (UK)

    I have been working at Business Wire full-time (more than 3 years)

    Pros

    has health insurance, good beginner's job in media sector, good location

    Cons

    Where to begin? First of all, salary is not great, benefits are nothing special, work is quite repetitive. Office culture is unprofessional: supervisors and managers have no idea of how to manage people, they got their positions because they ‘knew’ the right people or were ‘friends’ with decision makers. Very US-centric, very high turn-over of employees. If you make a mistake, your mistake will be logged in an Excel file, sent at the end of the month to the HQ in San Francisco and will come up again in your yearly review. Not more than 5 sick days allowed. Attitude towards editors is condescending and disrespectful, you are not allowed to use your brain but have to always follow ‘standard operating procedure’, which means ticking boxes on checklists as if you have no idea of what you are doing.
    Extremely old hardware, computers are about 7 years old, software is also extremely old and slow, but when employees complain about slow computers it is considered as unacceptable and if you ask for a new computer the answer is "this is not gonna happen". Broken computers are being shipped to San Francisco for repair and then shipped back to Europe.
    Sales people are hired and fired almost on a monthly basis, you can be fired for anything, but the main reason is lack of ‘obedience’ or an independent attitude. You will be walked to the door like a criminal, - this procedure is normal in big financial corporations, but Business Wire is a very small company in comparison and this treatment of employees is very demoralising.
    One of the cheapest companies I know: no tea or coffee or milk for tea provided. Tab water provided however!
    No room for advancement, no discussions about career paths, management couldn’t care less when people leave, on the contrary, people who leave get complimented that they have found another job.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Soviet-style leadership doesn't bring the best results...

    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO
There are newer employer reviews for Business Wire

Work at Business Wire? Share Your Experiences

Business Wire

 
Click to Rate
or

Your response will be removed from the review – this cannot be undone.