There are newer employer reviews for Cadmus Group

3 people found this helpful  

Low Salary and No Career Progression

  • Comp & Benefits
  • Work/Life Balance
  • Senior Management
  • Culture & Values
  • Career Opportunities
Former Employee - Analyst
Former Employee - Analyst

I worked at Cadmus Group full-time

Pros

Good healthcare and benefits – You pay relatively low premiums for good benefits.
Smart Peers – Most of your peers are bright and energetic people (but this doesn’t last very long after arriving at Cadmus).
Good learning experience – If you’re an entry-level candidate, you’ll learn quickly enough to get a new, better job.
Not all of the teams are the same, so some may have different experiences than others.

Cons

Very low salary – Cadmus pays approximately 20-25% lower than market value. They don’t even entertain the possibility that they may be underpaying you and barely give you a 2-3% raise each year, if you’re lucky. There is no salary adjustment based on location, even in the Washington DC metro area.

High Turnover – Cadmus recruits a lot of people right out of college that are eager to learn and succeed, so the staff is very motivated. Eventually, however, being overworked and underpaid makes them leave. Mid-level and junior-level turnover is extremely high – it is understood that no one stays more than a year or maybe two.

Stressful schedule and raise structure – You must bill 44 hours a week (you are not told this during the interview) to make the company competitive. If you don’t, you are reprimanded, even if there is no work. While this is not officially required, you won’t get promoted if you don’t do it. If you do work the 44 hours, however, there’s no guarantee you will get promoted since management tends to pick favorites. People end up working 50-60 hours a week and get burned out quickly.

Terrible management – Senior managers have no idea what they are doing, are not trained on how to manage staff, are unable to communicate effectively, and generally make up things as they go along. Frankly, they don’t care about you as long as the work gets done.

Inconsistent policies – As Cadmus has grown, there has been very little effort to revisit/revise company policies and corporate structure. Also, managing projects and project work varies from group to group without any level of consistency.

No opportunities for professional growth – There is no effort to encourage employees to participate in any professional growth opportunities. In fact, the policy usually is that if it costs Cadmus money, don’t do it. Cadmus has many different service areas but you’re pretty much confined to working on your team. There is also little opportunity to move up for most staff.

Dull work and lack of work – The work is so administrative and boring. There is little room for growth. Lay-offs across different teams are not uncommon because of the lack of work.

Advice to ManagementAdvice

If you want to keep staff around, you have to invest in them and treat them like individuals.

Doesn't Recommend
Negative Outlook
Disapproves of CEO

25 Other Employee Reviews for Cadmus Group (View Most Recent)

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  1. 2 people found this helpful  

    Good learning opportunity - Poor salary and senior management

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee  in  Arlington, VA
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in Arlington, VA

    I worked at Cadmus Group

    Pros

    I learned a lot, feel prepared for anything that my next job throws at me, and developed very close friendships with my peers or fellow “junior staff.”

    Cons

    High turnover: Saw average annual turnover of 100% among junior staff and 150% turnover in junior and mid-level staff combined.

    At one point, we lost more than 50% of our team in less than two months as a testament to the poor salary and negative work environment.

    Salary: Starting salary is approximately 10 – 15 thousand lower than competitors in comparable industries. Cadmus does not adjust salary for location. A starting “research analyst” in DC or Boston will make the same salary as someone working from Montana or Wisconsin, where cost of living is lower.

    No staff recognition: Junior staff work extremely hard and with very few breaks (there’s pressure from management to not take lunch breaks.) Recognition isn’t a part of Cadmus’ management model. Though junior staff are expected to work hard and learn quickly, they never will be recognized for it and penalized if they don’t.

    Very poor staff management: My workload vacillated between being so busy I was overwhelmed with work to not having enough to hit my monthly hourly target. (Note that pay is docked when you do not meet your minimum billable hours.) Both situations create extreme stress and anxiety in the workplace, leading to an overall negative working environment.

    Very poor senior leadership: Time and time again senior leadership leveraged their power within the company to see that their personal interests were prioritized, at the expense of team morale and the best interests of the mid-level and junior staff.

    No on-boarding: You are thrown into 3 or 4 major projects without any on-boarding or official training. Junior staff are expected to be trained by their peers by means of total immersion, which often proves to be inconsistent and leaves large gaps in the knowledge base.

    Long Work Weeks: Cadmus billing approach proved to be a rigid and inflexible way to bill time, especially in the ebb and flow of government contract work. Cadmus’s true expectations are revealed a few weeks after you start. To meet expectations, you need to complete over a month of free work each year.

    Split offices: Cadmus frequently splits teams and divides senior leadership. One of Cadmus’ main problems is staff management, so this inevitably contributes to this problem.

    Not-winning contacts: In addition to indiscriminate layoffs, Cadmus doesn’t have a strong track record of winning new government contracts, creating an unspoken cloud of anxiety among coworkers and overall sense of job insecurity.

    Annual review: Cadmus practices a “full circle review” performance model each year to evaluate performance and determine salary increases. You are expected to write a lengthy self-evaluation and evaluate every person you work with. You are expected to do this in your free time, which takes an average of 15 hours each year.

    The outcomes of the evaluation process are indiscriminate and unclear. You must be there for a year to be eligible for promotion (even if you’re performing at a higher level during the time of review.) Even though your salary starts at significantly lower than competitors, you can expect to receive a 2-3% salary increase if you’re not promoted and 10% increase (if you’re lucky) if you are promoted.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Approves of CEO
  2. 4 people found this helpful  

    Over Worked - Under Paid

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Associate  in  Waltham, MA
    Current Employee - Associate in Waltham, MA

    I have been working at Cadmus Group full-time for more than 5 years

    Pros

    The best part of cadmus is the health care benefits. Out of pocket costs are very minimal. You can generally come in and leave when you want to as long as you get your work done.

    Great office locations: Boulder, Portland, Boston (Waltham). Offers flexibility if you want to relocate to a different office or anywhere for that matter. Several staff work remotely from all over the US.

    Cons

    They "suggest" you work 44 hours per week. Though it is not required, they base your annual performance on how many hours you've billed versus how many hours you took time off for or were not billing clients. The 10% over a typical 40 hour work week over the course of the year, adds up to roughly the same amount of time you get for vacation and holidays. So essentially, they want you to work additional hours to compensate for the time you take for vacation or get for paid holidays.

    The age of staff is generally young (fresh out of college). Cadmus loves to hire these people because they can pay them low wages and work them to the bone since they have a lot of ambition just getting out of college. This often results in a lot of inexperience around the work place.

    Almost always, projects are never completed ahead of time and are always pushed to the last minute (and yes people sleep at work sometimes) in order to meet unrealistic deadlines.

    There is absolutely no work/life balance. Lots of people work 60+ hours, staff are consistently in the office on the weekends, and some even do more work when they get home after dinner since the workload is so intense.

    This relates to poor management, work distribution and overall staffing.

    You annual evaluation is a "black box calculation" at best. Favoritism is certainly apart of Cadmus and more so during annual reviews. You never really have a clear expectation of your performance or how they will evaluate you, which correlates to not knowing if you will get a raise/promotion. Raises are usually less than 3% per year if you dont get promoted. And even then, a 10% or great raise is not likely.

    There is no office comradery or team building exercises to help you get to know your fellow employees. It costs Cadmus too much money to not have staff billing time, so they would rather have you be working and billing hours than to reward you with something fun in the afternoon and leaving the office early.

    Turn over rate is high.

    Very great company if you want to work long hours, feel stressed and under pressure due to poor workload management, get small raises annually and feel under appreciated on a weekly basis.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO
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