Children's National Health System

  www.childrensnational.org
  www.childrensnational.org
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1 person found this helpful  

cnmc

  • Comp & Benefits
  • Work/Life Balance
  • Senior Management
  • Career Opportunities
Current Employee - Anonymous Employee  in  Washington, DC
Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Washington, DC

I have been working at Children's National Health System

Pros

busy center, complicated patients. young employees are great to work with

Cons

not particularly valued by management

Advice to ManagementAdvice

its not all about the fame and philanthropy. its the people who get it done.

Doesn't Recommend

74 Other Employee Reviews for Children's National Health System (View Most Recent)

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  1. 4 people found this helpful  

    Caste system in effect, morale problems

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Analyst  in  Washington, DC
    Current Employee - Analyst in Washington, DC

    I have been working at Children's National Health System

    Pros

    If you are a medical professional, your compensation and benefits package are good and you are near the top of the corporate hierarchy. Discounted healthcare for your children.

    Cons

    There is a definite caste system where non-medical, non-managerial professionals are the untouchables. Technically proficient individuals are prevented from advancing and are not considered for managerial positions as the company prefers to hire from outside. All employees are given an annual bonus, however, skilled professionals are given the same bonus, about $500, as unskilled workers. Bonuses increase substantially for managers and medical professionals.

    Parking downtown is a major problem.

    There are morale problems. The company has engaged a couple of consulting firms (note again the reliance on outsiders) to assess employee satisfaction over the past few years. Managers have frequent meetings, and although incentive payments have a 10% component related to communicating with staff, very little information is shared with their direct reports. When you ask for information from somebody within the department, the first question that is asked is, "Why do you need it?" People outside of the department will request the same information from many different analysts because they do not trust that they will receive accurate data. There is currently a push to be "employer of choice," but management has not explained what it feels makes an employer an employer of choice.

    The skill sets of analysts are not fully leveraged or appreciated. Claims are made that we "are paid to think," but analysts are just expected to run reports, not analyze or interpret the results.

    A program has been unveiled to recognize the performance of employees on the spot, but managers are hesitant to recognize staff. The bonus is not cash, but rather points to use on goods on a dedicated web site. One on the spot bonus is sufficient to buy a pack of socks or an old VHS tape, nothing of significance. You need about 4 of these bonuses to buy a video game or a dress shirt.

    A lot of managerial behavior is driven by incentive payments. There will not be money available to attend training or conferences because a large portion of director bonuses are based on their ability to stay under budget. Pay raises have been limited for the support staff for several years and have not kept up with the rise in the cost of living. Although managers have not received any pay raises due to "the economy," incentive payments for the managers have continued to rise and continue to be paid out despite the state of the economy.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Recognize the value of your support staff. Change the bonus system to recognize individual performance properly. It is insulting to receive the same bonus as somebody who has contributed little to the company's performance. I realize you feel guilty that you get paid so much based on your employee's work, but we don't like getting your crumbs.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Disapproves of CEO
  2. 3 people found this helpful  

    Not nirvana

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee  in  Washington, DC
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Washington, DC

    I have been working at Children's National Health System

    Pros

    The mission and the tremendous talent at Children's National are compelling reasons for working there. It is also a place where one is thanked for one's work and one's efforts are appreciated--at least in certain areas.

    Cons

    The downsides are: non-clinical departments spread out within DC, Silver Spring and elsewhere, which impedes successful work and alignment of how goals and objectives will be met; the inadequate parking situation at the hospital itself, which represents a significant barrier to visiting for work-related purposes when one's office is located off-site; and the very hierarchical culture, which means that leadership does not feel obliged to (or even comfortable with) getting to know everyone else.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    My advice would be to bring all off-site departments to one place very close by the hospital; increase parking space availability; and loosen up some of the hierarchical structures, which impede important bottom-up communication and alignment.

    Approves of CEO
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