DISH

  www.dish.com
  www.dish.com
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7 people found this helpful  

If you want to be treated like a child, work at DISH

  • Comp & Benefits
  • Work/Life Balance
  • Senior Management
  • Culture & Values
  • Career Opportunities
Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
Current Employee - Anonymous Employee

I have been working at DISH full-time

Pros

Discounted cable service with all premium channels and service. This is the one and only benefit of working for the company.

Cons

Micromanagement - be prepared to have your manager spend more time watching what you do than working themselves.
Depressing work environment - walk around the cafeteria. All conversations center around the misery of working here.
DISH is the meanest company in America - google it. I would have said that before but nationally recognized publications agree.

Advice to ManagementAdvice

The golden rule. Treat others how you'd like to be treated.

Doesn't Recommend
Negative Outlook
Disapproves of CEO

1891 Other Employee Reviews for DISH (View Most Recent)

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  1. 8 people found this helpful  

    Demoralizing, Every Man For Himself Company Culture

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Field Service Specialist I in Wilmington, MA
    Current Employee - Field Service Specialist I in Wilmington, MA

    I have been working at DISH full-time (more than an year)

    Pros

    Van, Tools, Training and Uniform provided. No personal investment required (think contractors). Enjoyable to work outdoors. Like any job, I'll miss the people I worked with.

    Cons

    I started working for Dish with a can-do, carpe diem, make your own opportunities work ethic, and left downtrodden and cynical 18 months later.
    Without exaggeration, in an office of about 20 technicians, an average of one and a half technicians left for every month I worked there. We were hired to work 4x10 shifts, but it was very rare to work less than 12 hours. As we started to lose techs faster than we hired them, one or two days of mandatory overtime a week was the norm. Yes, we were paid, but it was mandatory and usually imposed right before the end of the work week. You made plans for the weekend a month ago? Too bad. You hardly ever spend time with friends or family because you're desperate to hold on to your $14/hour job? Take it or leave it. This multibillion dollar company won't risk one penny of its share value to improve working conditions.
    The most important tools used to evaluate your job performance were QAS (quality assurance inspections) and the dreaded metrics. If you fail a single QAS within three months of the last failure, you are ineligible for promotion or any raises. This would actually be reasonable if you were being judged on brand new installs at single family homes in the suburbs. However, not only were we usually tested on triplexes and MDUs in the city where it is impossible, IMPOSSIBLE to do a standard install, but we were held to the same standard for trouble calls, which we were expected to complete within one hour. Did the installer practically destroy the house three years ago? Will it take 3 hours to fix? Too bad, all the other techs have their own ridiculous routes to worry about and you're responsible. At least you can keep your job, though.
    With metrics, your job was constantly at stake and numerous techs were fired by nameless middle managers with access to spreadsheets with our numbers. Thinking that he was coming in for mandatory overtime, one tech was called in on his day off only to discover someone had ordered his termination. The metrics included job completion rate, 12 day trouble call rate, and customer survey score. They were largely out of our control and impossible to dispute.
    I'm against unions in general, but I felt so angry and desperate most of the time, I would have risked my job to join one. I really felt like I had nothing to lose towards the end.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    What is there to say when the CEO responds to legitimate and overwhelmingly negative criticism from rank and file employees by saying there are worse places to work? Where's the concern? The economy is improving and your best employees will not forget how they were treated when they had nowhere else to go. Dish will never again go through a period of adding a million customers a year, and it needs to give a little back (money, benefits, humane working conditions) to its employees if it wants to hang on to the customers it already has. Instead, it has taken a near-sighted approach of extreme cost cutting, and substituting good, local, common sense management with a distant, manage by numbers approach.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO
  2. 1 person found this helpful  

    Lots of Mandatory overtime, but good pay

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Techmician in Pembroke, NH
    Former Employee - Techmician in Pembroke, NH

    I worked at DISH full-time (more than 3 years)

    Pros

    good pay, working out in the field on your own, when you work directly for the company they provide a van and gas which is a big money saver compared to being a sub contractor.

    Cons

    constant change, when you think youre doing something right the next week its wrong. Long hours and never knowing when your day is going to be over.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Be patient with youre techs because how they perform affects you too.

    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO
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