Denver Health and Hospital Authority

  www.denverhealth.org
  www.denverhealth.org
There are newer employer reviews for Denver Health and Hospital Authority

5 people found this helpful  

Went from the best hospital to work for in Denver to not.

  • Comp & Benefits
  • Work/Life Balance
  • Senior Management
  • Culture & Values
  • Career Opportunities
Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in Denver, CO
Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in Denver, CO

I worked at Denver Health and Hospital Authority full-time (more than 10 years)

Pros

Amazing teamwork and camaraderie between the staff. I worked in the ICU's for over 10 years, one of the main reasons being my relationships with co-workers and our shared passions of everything medicine.

Cost and quality of employee health care coverage.

Retirement benefits.

Cons

This is being written by a former employee of over a decade who loves Denver Health very much. I am not posting this not to dissuade future employees or to intentionally defame, but rather as somebody who sees Denver Health as family and is trying everything they can to put an end to the treatment my family is being subjected to.

The atmosphere throughout the hospital deteriorated throughout the last few years of my employment. It seemed to begin with the acquisition of our new CEO. For example, under the previous CEO's leadership, Dr. Gabow, the LEAN system of DH was one of the best. Employees constantly took on personal projects to help save money. Rapid improvement events were always ongoing to eliminate waste and improve productivity. The staff were challenged and encouraged to take on projects of their own. DH was in the black for several years. Not too bad for the safety net hospital! Employee attitudes were mostly positive. DH was a sought after hospital to work for by those who had a passion for medicine and a passion to help others. Those who only wanted a paycheck by doing the least amount of work possible generally didn't last long. DH didn't buy a certificate showing off that they were one of the best. Didn't need to. It was common knowledge throughout the industry and it showed.

Shortly after changing CEO's, LEAN projects quickly went from an every day occurrence to only a memory. The head of LEAN abruptly retired shortly after staff projects ceased. Lean still exists today as a class offered to the public for a fee to obtain LEAN certification, but it is no longer a functioning entity within the hospital.

The atmosphere changed. We were given larger workloads and more paperwork. Our jobs were constantly threatened by our micromanaging leadership. Computers are slow with clunky charting software that required so much time patient care suffered. Management wasn't concerned about how we cared for our patients, we were being watched to see if we crossed our t's and dotted our i's. Patients were ignored. Patient safety was compromised. Why? Because we had to become a "Magnet" hospital.

About halfway through my career at DH money became tight. Our previous CEO, instead of imposing job cuts chose to stop yearly raises until things got better. The staff mostly accepted this and things eventually improved. At least nobody was laid off. Then our new CEO took over, cut the biggest money saving program we had in LEAN, and just a little over a year into his position announced 300 job cuts.

Some valuable employees were fired for nonsense reasons. Colorado is a right to work state and employers don't need a reason to terminate. However, if an employee loses their job under no fault of their own, they can file for unemployment benefits and their former employer gets taxed. If they are terminated for being at fault, no benefits. I'm not saying veteran employees were being terminated so DH could save some more money. What I do know is two friends were fired under silly circumstances. Both times Denver Health immediately appealed to stop their unemployment. Seems suspect to me.

On occasion, our new CEO would come to the A.V. room so he could practice with his band that he formed under the Denver Health Foundation. There were two A.V. employees. He would take one to run his band equipment, doubling the workload of the other. The A.V. person who received the increased work load was not very happy on days when they were busy. It didn't matter to the CEO. I felt sorry for them.

We were too scared to do anything out of this fear they created. I'm not joking, it got to the point that I would act happy around anybody considered administration, avoid eye contact, and say very little strictly out of fear that they would find a reason to turn on me and that would be it.

I'm not going to say how my career ended with DH. I am concerned about how my friends are being treated and something needs to be done. I still talk to many of my former co-workers on a daily basis and it hasn't gotten any better.

Google the new CEO. He has an interesting history involving his being investigated for illegal financial practices. It's public record.

Advice to ManagementAdvice

...

Doesn't Recommend
Negative Outlook
Disapproves of CEO

52 Other Employee Reviews for Denver Health and Hospital Authority (View Most Recent)

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  1.  

    Great benefits, good culture.

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Instructional Design and Training Specialist in Denver, CO
    Current Employee - Instructional Design and Training Specialist in Denver, CO

    I have been working at Denver Health and Hospital Authority full-time (more than an year)

    Pros

    Great benefits, good work/life balance, large organization rooted in Denver.

    Cons

    Very slow to action and work, non-profit culture.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    More advancement and salary opportunities.

    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    Approves of CEO
  2. 1 person found this helpful  

    Be Aware

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I worked at Denver Health and Hospital Authority (more than 5 years)

    Pros

    12 hour shifts which can help with planning life outside work.

    Cons

    12 hour shifts, rotating days

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Listening to those who are working with patients to achieve goals to keep patients safe by only hiring those with experience in a speciality unit as defined by nursing councils.

    No opinion of CEO
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