Diebold

  www.diebold.com
  www.diebold.com
There are newer employer reviews for Diebold

 

Once was a great company

  • Comp & Benefits
  • Work/Life Balance
  • Senior Management
  • Culture & Values
  • Career Opportunities
Current Employee - Field Service Technician in Canton, OH
Current Employee - Field Service Technician in Canton, OH

I have been working at Diebold full-time (more than 5 years)

Pros

Company vehicle, bank holidays,coworkers

Cons

Company appears to be lost, raising the price of the stock seem to be the only priority . No raises , can't get parts. Company appears to have money problems

Advice to ManagementAdvice

Don't expect more from the people in the field when you are giving them less and less and you are receiving six figure or more bonuses

Doesn't Recommend
Negative Outlook
Disapproves of CEO

257 Other Employee Reviews for Diebold (View Most Recent)

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  1.  

    Amazed that they are still in business

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in Greensboro, NC
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in Greensboro, NC

    I worked at Diebold full-time (more than 5 years)

    Pros

    I enjoy working with the people in my team

    Cons

    Terribly managed, awful pay, no communication between departments

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Find another line of work. It is inevitable that a bad call is going to be made if one is in charge for a while,,, but at Diebold, its like management hit the "bad call" lottery. They constantly make decisions that are detrimental to the business and especially to employees on the floor. Moral is extremely low and upper management could care less. Oh yeah, and there is blatant favoritism shown to some employees, and the HR department is inconsistent with policies (by inconsistent I mean BIPOLAR).
    I hope this review helps to change things, but like the "engagement" survey, it will be ignored.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO
  2. 2 people found this helpful  

    Like others said, was once a great company that sadly went downhill.

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Customer Solutions Engineer II in West Chicago, IL
    Former Employee - Customer Solutions Engineer II in West Chicago, IL

    I worked at Diebold full-time (more than 10 years)

    Pros

    Good pay.
    Was fun to build customer relationships.
    Service training was top-notch.
    Lots of OT (if you wanted it).
    Good vacation allowance.
    Lots of good people to work with, and work for.
    Company-provided cell phone, laptop, and van.
    In my years, observed a policy that gives the worker EVERY chance to succeed or fail; they weren't trigger-happy when it came to terminating someone (other than the waves off layoffs...).

    Cons

    Cost of benefits have skyrocketed, while the quality of them went downhill. 401K was suspended at times. Merit increases, when they do give them, do not offset the the annual increase in cost of benefits. In nearly 12 years, NEVER received any bonus stock, even though that was touted as a benefit.

    Work/life ratio not great.

    Lots of OT (even if you DIDN'T want it).

    Promised promotions never materialized.

    No incentive to advance to management, as those positions are torture relative to the modest increase in pay that is received (or, even a decrease if you take previous OT pay into account...).

    As far as my take on the overall company philosophy in that time frame:

    Sadly, as much as they tried to buck the negative trends of many other US companies, it didn't last. As stated in previous reviews, company focus shifted when stock price declined. Cost cutting became the solution, as opposed to true product innovation and generating revenue (a wise businessman once said that you cannot cut your way to prosperity).Started getting desperate and instead of focusing on improving core business, would take on service of any oddball, misfit third-party product they could in feeble attempts to bring in more revenue.

    Keeps trying to make the stock look good to investors by continuing to raise the stock dividends to maintain their precious 50+ year streak of doing so, no matter what impact it has on their profitability.

    Let their national accounts bully them over the years to the point that they had no leverage when it came to renewing contracts. Capitulated to their large customers' increasingly unreasonable demands, fearful of losing that customer to a competitor - then eventually lost those customers, anyway, due to not being able to satisfy those demands that they had agreed to.

    Too many low- to mid-level managers (but at least in the Chicago area, most were great to work with and were reasonably fair across the board). Even so, they were overworked by their superiors and handcuffed by managing for performance number expectations more often than managing people.

    The ''Good-Ol'-Boy'' network of high-level executives would preach innovation and change, but did not back up the talk with action. Their "innovation" would consist of spending millions on pre-packaged cost-cutting solutions (irony alert). As a result, the company has been left in the dust by their self-service financial competitors' truly innovative product offerings, and customers are now looking elsewhere for their future needs.

    Still selling the same ATM line they introduced in 2003!

    Previous CEO and BOD perhaps doomed the company by not accepting (let alone not even considering) the United Technologies buyout offer in 2008. Their stance was that the company would be just fine remaining as an independent entity. This was at the time the economy had tanked, and the offer price was nearly 25% higher than the company was valued at. Oops.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Now that I have been away for over a year, I think I can be reasonably objective instead of sounding bitter. I started there in 2001, and after the first year, I was sure I would be in for the long haul - maybe even retire there. The company was solid and fun to work for; however, by the time year 10 came around, I knew I would reluctantly be leaving, and did when the right opportunity came along.

    The new CEO can't be blamed for trying to fix a company that was horribly mismanaged by the previous leadership; unfortunately, he had no choice to do what he's done so far. Hopefully, there is a solid plan to rebuild the company's stance in the industry.

    Instead of reciting the usual - you know, listen to your employees, become more innovative, etc., WHICH THEY SHOULD, here are three other thoughts:

    1) Focus on your bread-and-butter, and stop jumping into competition in already-saturated markets

    For instance, Diebold resisted getting into the fire-alarm business for years, because they thought, rightly so, that it was a too-crowded and expensive market that would cost a fortune in regulatory fees and certifications; but then they got desperate for revenue and jumped in anyway. It has proven to be closer to disaster than success at this point - especially after jumping into an ill-advised agreement with one of the largest banks in America to service their alarm systems. At the time, they were already strained for manpower, then subsequently offered early retirement to a slew of technicians...

    2) Offer your customers more enticing long-term product/service packages.

    Since you have been historically unwilling to compete on product pricing, come up with some packages that allow the customer to buy-in for a small outlay upfront, and make your profit on the back-end. The attitude of "our prices are set that way because we are the best" doesn't fly anymore - because, right now, you're NOT the best.

    3) (This one is radical, but:) Get out of the ATM/financial self-service manufacturing and marketing business.

    Let's face it - it's going to be a long, hard, uphill battle to get back to a competitive level of product to what your competitors offer. Your bread and butter is SERVICE. Service revenue has surpassed sales revenue, so, license or sell off the manufacturing part of the ATM business, with an agreement for perpetual rights to service training and certification in exchange, and become a financial SERVICE COMPANY exclusively. You already service third-party products; you are better-equipped to compete in that arena, and can take advantage of customers' growing dissatisfaction of quality of service with your main competitor.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    No opinion of CEO
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