EY
3.6 of 5 3,782 reviews
www.ey.com London, United Kingdom 5000+ Employees

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5 people found this helpful  

Opportunity for FAST career growth, but at a price...

Business Development (Former Employee)
Chicago, IL

I worked at EY full-time for more than 8 years

ProsFor someone looking to grow their career quickly, EY provides excellent opportunities to do that. Because the organization is always changing based on what the market is up to or current regulations, there are a lot of growth opportunities. There is a lot of structure throughout the entire organization. Benefits are great, with opportunities to purchase supplemental life insurance and legal plans. 3 weeks vacation, higher than average compensation, opportunities for performance bonuses, strict annual review process and salary adjustments (no one was EVER overdue in providing an annual review). Abundant opportunities to collaborate with some of the smartest and hardest working people in the industry. FLEXIBILITY, FLEXIBILITY, FLEXIBILITY!!!!!

ConsThe expectation to perform is higher than at any other place I've ever worked. There is very little room for less than perfect. The culture at the top of the organization is very "old rich white guy", especially the Midwest leadership based out of Chicago. The leadership in the Chicago office is very old school micro-management and in the down economy someone was always pointing the finger, trying to cover their backside. Reduced sales figures and poor performance of sales initiatives were not just the result of the down economy, someone must be to blame for why a particular service hasn't sold. The expectation that you will do whatever it takes to get the job done is ALWAYS there. If one wants to get promoted, they must be willing to work whenever it's required, even if it means being up in the middle of the night to take a call with someone in China or leave a sick child or drive through a blizzard to make a meaningless meeting. One must be very determined to advance their career and continue to move up. There's a saying, "Up the chain or out on the street". So, for someone just looking to do a great job at one thing for a long time, there's really no place for you unless you desire to be an administrative assistant (these folks are treated VERY poorly, most are unhappy and there is very LITTLE respect and appreciation for their role). This mentality can be particularly challenging for working mothers, desiring a consistent family life. I started out my career here working 40 hour weeks and over the course of 8 years ended up working 60-80 hour weeks on a consistent basis. Which lead to terrible burn out. One must be in the "inner circle" to be noticed and get the good opportunities. If you are on the outside, be worried - very worried. I've rating the culture and values very low, because the messaging from the organization preaches the best culture and values - it's on every bit of promotional material within the company. The messaging is a dream for an employee, but it is very seldom the reality of what happens once you have been around a while and take off the rose-colored glasses.

Advice to Senior ManagementFrom Turley on down through senior level leadership, you need to consider that you are given the best years of a person's career. If you burn them out with impossible expectations over several years, you leave no where for them to go. Especially women with children. Rather than "counseling them out" after they've given you everything they have to give, why not develop roles that are lower profile, yet still contributing to the organization and fulfilling to the employee? The hush-hush "counseling out" process is a humiliating and demeaning process that should be entirely shut down. Additionally, someone should be looking closer at the Midwest leadership team and their "group think" practices. The leadership in this office speaks terrible of every employee they think is not performing to par and they do it in front of others, laughing and nodding their heads in agreement about it. It's disgusting.

Yes, I would recommend this company to a friend

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Overall, great experience people were great and work was engaging.

Tax Intern (Current Employee)
Charlotte, NC

I have been working at EY as an intern for less than a year


Pros: Culture is great and people were very helpful. Learned a lot and really enjoyed all of… Cons: No real feedback until the end. A friend was hurt by this as he was let go at the end because he did not… Advice to Senior Management: Keep it up. In addition, try to find more work… Yes, I would recommend this company to a friend More

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It is a great place to work

International Tax Manager (Current Employee)
Houston, TX

I have been working at EY full-time for more than 5 years


Pros: Strong coaching culture. Excellent team culture. Great Flexibility. Cons: Salaries may be on the low side compare to industry. Advice to Senior Management: Keep the strong coaching culture. Yes, I would recommend this company to a friend – I'm optimistic about the outlook for this company… More

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