There are newer employer reviews for EY

Great place to start a career

  • Comp & Benefits
  • Work/Life Balance
  • Senior Management
  • Career Opportunities
Former Employee - Manager in San Jose, CA
Former Employee - Manager in San Jose, CA

I worked at EY

Recommends
Approves of CEO
Recommends
Approves of CEO

Pros

Flexible work arrangement, work from home, competitive compensation, opportunities to travel abroad, great expense reimbursement policy, mentoring, great people and networks.

Cons

with the current economic crisis management is pushing on getting a 55 hour work week that greatly affects the worklife balance of people. at the manager level, there isn't much of career dev't available.

Advice to Management

create a more trustful environment in the organization; reach out and get to know people better; happy people means happy clients.

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  1. Headloine

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Staff I in San Francisco, CA
    Current Employee - Staff I in San Francisco, CA

    I have been working at EY

    Approves of CEO
    Approves of CEO

    Pros

    There are a lot of opportunities to meet new people and make friends with all the other super cool accountants.

    Cons

    Long hours, grumpy seniors, not chill.

    Advice to Management

    More training.

  2. Helpful (5)

    Politics still at the forefront in Big 4

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Senior Manager in New York, NY
    Former Employee - Senior Manager in New York, NY

    I worked at EY

    No opinion of CEO
    No opinion of CEO

    Pros

    I agree that EY is a great place to "launch" your career (as they so proudly advertise). There are alot of younger people in the same boat as you to network with (ie misery loves company). You get great exposure to many Fortune 500 companies - so you can learn a lot of things in your first 3-5 years at the Firm. Because budgets are so tight, good resources scarce, and deadlines unreasonable - you will also learn how to work very hard and as efficiently as possible. I think Big 4 alumni coming into industry clearly have a leg up in this regard

    Cons

    Where to start....obviously, like any Big 4 - the hours are ridiculous. You may find one or two Senior Managers or Partners that can actually say they have a decent work-life balance, but the majority of all people that work at the Firm do not. You cannot.

    It seems to be a vicous cycle - many of the "best" people leave the firm to go on to succeed in industry. If you do the math, only a small percentage of people that work in the Firm are Partners - so, if good people leave - the majority of Managers and Senior Managers arent very good. The incompetence at that level is basically what drives the additional hours for those at the lower levels. Those running the engagements know nothing about project management, and often are lax on the subject matter so endless are are a result of poor planning and lots of rework.

    Additionally, EY (advisory) could care less about quality of work and "people". It is an endless grovelling to try and win and/or expand new work. Success at the firm means absolutely nothing about how much you actually know, or how hard you work. If you are a greasy snake and can stomach
      - selling sand to an elderly woman in a desert,
      - backstabbing your peers and the people working below you, and
      - smoozing and kissing butt to whonever is in power that year -
    you will go far. Otherwise it is best to get out after you have suffered through your "learning curve"

    Advice to Management

    For an advisory practice that prides itself in snowing its clients on how much they know about "process" - they should take a look at themselves, and actually listen to their own recommendations. The internal "people, process and technology" is so broken, I am often amazed how clients cannot see how little and ill-informed the people that are advising them really are.

    The firm should be focusing more on real training, instead of cutting it out for "chargeable hours". Partner and Senior Managers should be spending more (instead of living in fear that they need to spend less) time at their clients and with their teams.

    Senior leadership is so disconnected with reality and ignorant I dont think they have the humilty to ever take any recommendations anyone gave them.

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