F5 Networks

  www.f5.com
  www.f5.com
There are newer employer reviews for F5 Networks

 

Work hard, play hard

  • Comp & Benefits
  • Work/Life Balance
  • Senior Management
  • Culture & Values
  • Career Opportunities
Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
Current Employee - Anonymous Employee

I have been working at F5 Networks full-time (more than an year)

Pros

Great people and exciting product line

Cons

There can be long hours

Advice to ManagementAdvice

Continue to keep a fun atmosphere to overcome negative aspects of long hours

Recommends
Positive Outlook
Approves of CEO

230 Other Employee Reviews for F5 Networks (View Most Recent)

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  1.  

    Balance of work with home life

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I have been working at F5 Networks full-time (more than an year)

    Pros

    Negotiable flexible work hours and friendly atmosphere which makes one feel welcome. Very multicultural and inclusive. Opportunities for career growth as company is expanding.

    Cons

    Hiring process is long so might need to wait it out. Entry positions sometimes do not renumerate at the same rate as competitors.

    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO
  2.  

    Great salary, terrible politics, tons of work and worst managers - classic "golden cage" that is entering a downhill

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Professional Services Engineer At A Remote Branch
    Former Employee - Professional Services Engineer At A Remote Branch

    I worked at F5 Networks full-time (more than an year)

    Pros

    - They pay higher than the market plus quarterly bonuses and shares (RSU) - so the money is great, thus it is the main reason to make you want to stay.
    - Technology keeps running forwards (sometimes too fast, which leads to poor output), so it is always interesting.
    - Most folks are above average on the technical side and OK on the personal side
    - Facilities are running from OK to old and lacking of maintenance
    - Nice gifts on holidays
    - Some tolerance for eccentric employee behavior, like strange cloths (mostly in Seattle) and alcohol at the cubic (sometimes this is negative)

    Cons

    - The company tries to run as lean as possible, which means every person is squeezed to the bone - being pushed to work overtime, night, weekends and holidays, just to meet unrealistic deadlines while trying to accomplish tons of work, which should be shared by more than one person.
    So, realistically, they pay to one person a 1.25 or 1.5 salary to do the work of two or almost two employees.
    - Although that, there are islands where there are folks who do very little, on the same role and salary level, but managers do not divert them to help the overloaded employees. They are the lucky ones.
    - Travel, even transatlantic, is always at the economic class, for almost all employee levels, except for the very top managers.
    - Most of the 1st and 2nd line managers are terrible. Appointed and promoted mostly by seniority rather than by being suitable to be managers. Simply try to run by the lean atmosphere and push the employees to meet deadlines, without really helping them achieve it or questioning how realistic are the targets.
    - Many veteran folks create just a few "close circle" groups that control the company and decide who's in and who's out, even if the employee is good - aiming to keep their regime.
    - Shortage of resources and tools (hardware and software) to accomplish your work, which also makes it hard to meet deadlines.
    - Low number of annual vacation days (to make you stay at work...)
    - Upper management doesn't really care about how things are doing below them. Only come to do the "showoff" presentations to the crowd, but don't wish to hear what is really happening on the "factory floor" thus not meeting with non-managers.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    F5 is known to be great for its salary, technology enthusiasm and open culture. This is all nice and good, but not enough. The company is both rapidly growing and moving from its safe ground of networking, into the security realm, which the company it is not really ready for nor know how to deal with.
    The security world has many veteran giants who rule the land and know the game. It is not the networking world, and you will learn it with some harsh lessons. The current company culture and way of work is not ready for this challenge, of paranoid attitude, much research and very short response time.
    The company is currently breathing its own past glory perfume, from the ADC world, not realistic about what is corrupting it from the inside of it and how to face the coming challenges that will come from the security uncharted land.

    Some words to the CEO - Show yourself more on the factory floor (also meaning at all branches, not just Seattle). Take single employees to one-on-one talk (let them know they can ask for it but also randomly pick ones), do focus groups with several employees at once - encourage folks to talk freely with you, without being afraid to be punished for speaking their minds. Let your all-levels managers know that no part of the company is hidden from you - so they can't hide their wrong doings.

    Drastically improve the way managers are selected, mostly when it is their first managerial role. Don't count only on their seniority. I realize it looks good to promote from the inside, but base it on skills and ability, not just by counting years of service.

    Strengthen HR:
    - Currently they only execute what the mangers tell them to, thus being the "human shield" for the managers. - Reconstruct the dismissal process - you lose good folks just because they did not were friendly to the correct people - make sure that someone is dismissed only if it is really the last resort and no other options in the company fit that person.
    - If you dare - try to do a post mortem for dismissal events, see how things went wrong and what could have been done better. Talk with ex-employees, you may discover some surprising stuff, to say the least.
    - Spot, with HR, not only by what managers recommend, the talented ones and create career paths for them, so they will have a reason to stay in the company.

    - Watch very closely the remote branches, they always need much more care and attention than the HQ.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO
There are newer employer reviews for F5 Networks

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