There are newer employer reviews for FTI Consulting
There are newer employer reviews for FTI Consulting

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Helpful (7)

Great learning experience, awesome people, decent work/life balance, average pay

  • Work/Life Balance
  • Culture & Values
  • Career Opportunities
  • Comp & Benefits
  • Senior Management
Former Employee - Director in Washington, DC
Former Employee - Director in Washington, DC

I worked at FTI Consulting full-time (More than 5 years)

Recommends
Positive Outlook
Approves of CEO
Recommends
Positive Outlook
Approves of CEO

Pros

Pros – young, energetic culture, strong senior management, interesting projects, good overall benefits package:

1) Most offices and segments hire directly on campus, which is great in promoting a positive and fun culture and great learning environment
2) It probably depends on your group, but the senior management in my group was awesome, I felt like they truly looked out for my personal and career growth, as well as work-life balance… open-door policy 24/7
3) While you may get stuck on a boring project every now and then, most of the engagements are challenging, stimulating, and featured on the front pages of WSJ and CNBC, and you often feel like you’re making an impact doing real work
4) I felt the overall comp was roughly market average, but they have generous non-pay benefits like PTO, 401K, health, nice company dinners, golf outings, ball games, happy hours, holiday parties, etc.

Cons

Cons – many of the drawbacks of working for a large public company: misaligned corporate policies, poor bonus structure, rigid pay bands and promotion schedules:

1) Strict comp and promotion schedule complaints seems to be a common theme in the con reviews at FTI—the incentives are poorly aligned by corporate. For example, once after a stellar mid-year review I was told I was currently performing better than individuals at the position above me, but that I had to wait 9 months until April 1st when corporate approves all promotions together. Then, once you’re promoted, you have to wait your X number of years until you’re due up again … there’s really not much incentive to work hard in a non-promotion year since you’re not really working for a bonus (see below). Another time, after another year of great reviews, I was told “your market rate is probably $X, but corporate does not allow someone of your title to make that much, so we had to settle for $X - $7,000”… again, what kind of incentive is that to perform well if promotions and compensation are set by corporate in a pre-determined schedule and not completely merit-based?
2) When you’re part of a corporation appeasing shareholders, there will always be some expense watching and profit sharing. Despite the fact that I was in a strong-performing group (FLC), there were other groups that were shrinking (Corp Fin, Tech), or constantly writing down millions in goodwill (Strat Comm). So when you hear your segment lead cheerleading “record revenue, record EBITDA, record growth!” quarter after quarter, don't expect to see that reflected in a record paycheck.
3) This is not banking, do not expect much from your bonuses. Part of the bonus structure essentially pays you quarterly overtime based on utilization, but since that is largely out of your control, it rarely ever works out. I can’t tell you how many times I got boned working long hours for 10 straight weeks only to sit on the bench for the last 2 weeks of the quarter because the client was away on summer or Christmas vacation and I wound up with nothing. Also, little petty things, like they refused to pro-rate or pay my bonus when I left to get my MBA because I was not going to be at the firm the day the checks were paid.... even after I earned it working until midnight every night and flew cross-country for a client project for 10 weeks straight. The other portion—annual bonus—is an absolute joke if you’re below management-level… let’s just put it this way: the signing bonus I received as a 21-year college student wound up being the largest bonus of my 5+ year career at FTI.

Overall, I would call the comp structure "reactionary"... your pay would usually lag the market or your value for a little while, and then their would be a correction to bring you back to about average.

Advice to Management

I can't really comment on the top-upper management (i.e. C-suite), because they're all brand new in 2014 and I haven't yet had time to observe them, but I would say try to fix some of these archaic corporate policies... other firms seem to adapt to the changing consulting environment so much quicker than us. For the mid-upper management (i.e. segment leaders), keep up the good work.

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  1. Not bad, but not great

    Former Employee - Consultant
    Former Employee - Consultant

    I worked at FTI Consulting full-time

    Pros

    Respected in the industry, good benefits, work along side very smart colleagues, cordial office environment, opportunity to advance if that is what you are seeking.

    Cons

    Low compensation compared to similar firms, corporate culture is not clear, not much communication from management, bad work life balance


  2. Helpful (2)

    Poor mangement, work bottlenecks, bad culture

    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Vice President ( Senior Economist) in New York, NY
    Former Employee - Vice President ( Senior Economist) in New York, NY

    I worked at FTI Consulting full-time (More than 3 years)

    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    No opinion of CEO
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    Pros

    Good pay. Company is solvent and can pay the bills.

    Cons

    Poor mangement, work bottlenecks, bad culture. Sexist. Silo culture - departments do not interact. Work is hoarded by a few who could use smarter input from other departments and within their own department.

    Advice to Management

    Breakdown silos. Should share work across departments for best involvement by smartest people in the company. Protect workers from sexism and ageism. Old school culture 1950s. Young women (low paid) at the bottom - men rise faster - management seems to be waiting for women to get married and leave at age 35?


There are newer employer reviews for FTI Consulting
There are newer employer reviews for FTI Consulting

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