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Helpful (1)

High responsibility, good learning experiences.

  • Work/Life Balance
  • Culture & Values
  • Career Opportunities
  • Comp & Benefits
  • Senior Management
Former Employee - Senior Consultant
Former Employee - Senior Consultant

I worked at FactSet full-time (More than 3 years)

Recommends
Positive Outlook
No opinion of CEO
Recommends
Positive Outlook
No opinion of CEO

Pros

High responsibility, good learning experiences, autonomy.

Cons

Ability to maintain continuous challenges through role changes or promotions. Some large company bureaucracy.

Advice to Management

Align goals in all cross-functional areas of development, design, database, etc.

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  1. Helpful (4)

    Growing Pains .. Potential for an amazing company lost in execution.

    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in New York, NY
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in New York, NY

    I worked at FactSet full-time (More than 5 years)

    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    Pros

    Great work/life balance. Office clears out at 530. Company tends to hire people out of college (pro if you're out of college). Lots of heavy drinking with peers. Do not have to work hard/ stay late/ think outside of the box. Compensation is very tight, and recognition does not sync with intellectual capital, or contribution. Will look great on a resume for a few years of experience, or while you find another role with a client. After you've been there for a bit, many come in late, lie about appointments in calendar, or work from home. If you can get through the interview process, and seem to fit in with the culture, very easy to make a few key contacts, pretend you are an asset, and never have to really work. Especially when you can choose the people who peer review you.

    Cons

    Two main downfalls I see.
    1) Very cliquey, non-flat/communicative, to the point of hurting business.
    2) The Peter Principle, people are promoted to their level of incompetence.

    Managers largely are promoted who were decent at their old role, and with the company the longest. Since the company grew rapidly over the past, you see this many places. Leaving managers who can't really manage, think, or inspire. A huge determent to the employees below them, and company as a whole. To secure (or justify) their job, they create processes that are not the most efficient, and they are basically there to just barely manage personal relationships. At the worst, they are not recognizing the talent below them. This exacerbates the non communicative problem. This has gone on for so long because of the practice of hiring people out of school, no one questions. All of the best talent is hired away, left with the worst and least motivated.

    Advice to Management

    Ironic here. I think the advice to management, would be to actually listen to advice, from your company at all levels.

    When a consultant suggests (through the appropriate channels) to build an app, it sets a tone (to all the middle managers) when the upper manager of the company replies harshly that this would never be done because there was no value in doing this, alluding to all the points that the junior person failed to see. These types of actions perpetuate the growing pains for the company. Even if this idea was later adopted, and the request/exchange expunged from the database, people become paralyzed from promoting good ideas. You are left with yes men, and a company that is much like a barbell portfolio. (Not much in the middle, lots of older execs (with a flawed vision), and younger college grads (incapable of really executing))

    Stop hiring everyone (especially engineers) immediately out of college. A strength of the company has been it's service, and the caliber of the people, however as the company has grown, people have been promoted and have become career managers and have lost touch with the product.

    I believe all, or most of the upper management has only worked at this company. They need to seriously shake stuff up. There is no real plan (another writer quotes 'the next double' which is illustrative). The company has atrophied from it's historic key strengths. Hard for some to see the forest through the trees. The perspective is lost because there is none.

    My real aggressive advice to management would be to try to take the company private, do an overhaul cleaning of the structure/mgmt, make things flatter, promote good ideas and give employees credit for ideas and room to act on them, foster more communication, evaluate the serious opportunities and threats in the industry, buy an OMS or some way of becoming fully turnkey, and take on BBERG and all other competitors. ....Or just rest easy knowing you can retire easily, by not really having to change much, regardless of the outcome of the company.


  2. Helpful (1)

    software engineer

    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Software Engineer
    Current Employee - Software Engineer

    I have been working at FactSet full-time

    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    Approves of CEO
    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    Pros

    very good work life balance; nice coworkers; no pushing; soft deadline; free lunch

    Cons

    why we don't have free lunch at Friday :P


There are newer employer reviews for FactSet
There are newer employer reviews for FactSet

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