GE

  www.ge.com
  www.ge.com
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Good Company

  • Comp & Benefits
  • Work/Life Balance
  • Senior Management
  • Career Opportunities
Former Employee - Private Investigator  in  New York, NY
Former Employee - Private Investigator in New York, NY

I worked at GE

Pros

Good Company to work for when you are willing to work hard.

Cons

Sometimes they can overlook the obvious when it stares them in the face.

Advice to ManagementAdvice

Pay attention to your workers at all levels of the company

No opinion of CEO

2495 Other Employee Reviews for GE (View Most Recent)

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  1. 2 people found this helpful  

    Lots of downsides, but probably average for a large bureaucratic corporation

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Senior Engineer  in  Schenectady, NY
    Current Employee - Senior Engineer in Schenectady, NY

    I have been working at GE

    Pros

    Pay raises are consistent, generally low, but consistent. Benefits are average. Health plan was really good but now average due to high-deductible plan. Vacation plan is on par, was above average but reduced to par a few years ago. Pension plan is very good, but I suspect will be brought down to par in the next few years. Actual work time ('casual overtime') is on par, but could vary widely depending on what projects are involved with. Fairly easy to change job positions if want to completely leave current role, but may become more difficult to improve pay or position within existing organization. Job security is generally good. Cooperative with personal time-off type issues.

    Cons

    Poor leadership. I know that GE was known for great leadership, but those days are currently gone. There is a lack of long term vision of where want products to go, what customers want to serve, and how to get there. Long term projects struggle for years with little leadership engagement, and then leaders become surprised when crunch time comes and deadlines are missed. There is a lack of communication between leaders of different organizations, locations, etc. Professional confrontation that is sometimes required to resolve an issue is always pushed down to the engineer level for resolution, leaders are terrified to (professionally) confront another leader for fear of bad labels... in other words, there is a big incentive to keep things swept under the carpet.

    Incredible amount of bureaucracy. Simple tasks that used to take an educated decision by a few smart engineers with some involvement of some more senior engineers now require multiple levels of managers, consulting engineers, chief engineers, technical leaders, etc. Chief engineers have a very confrontational tone as well as have difficultly in accepting new ideas but at the same relentlessly push their new ideas even though not completely thought through.

    PowerPoint culture. Inordinate amount of time spent in PowerPoint. In theory the idea is that the PowerPoint slides summarize your work in order to communicate progress, risks, etc. Instead, all of the good engineering work that was done has to be force fit into a presentation tool so that the disengaged leadership chain and levels of bureaucracy can try to understand the basic concepts of what is going on. If you are good at PowerPoint you can go far in GE, but if you want to continue to sharpen your engineering skills you will otherwise find that they will become rusty mostly due to this.

    Difficult to get through to real customers. If you had previous industry experience, will likely be more comfortable in ability to make decisions, understand what is going on, and push for what you think is right for customers. Otherwise, customer's needs are filtered and passed down through multiple layers, ultimately leading to lowered customer expectations. Additionally, a culture has developed amongst those with less direct industry and customer experience, where they have become leaders that are setting direction for product offerings, design decisions, etc but clearly are missing the mark. This in turn also leads to the previous comment of rusty engineering skills, where the rank-and-file become out of touch with industry standards, customer expectations, etc. Additionally, things such as attending a conference or sitting on an industry standards board are reserved for a select few.

    Lack of team mentality. This is something simply have to accept in a 'meritocracy' such as GE. You are constantly conscious of your yearly EMS (yearly personnel review process), where more or less have to create a resume of accomplishments every year. On the surface it makes sense to put down your accomplishments to refresh the minds of those who determine pay raises, but it is clear that once it goes up one or two layers in the chain of command that any great individual or team efforts become less significant in lieu of name recognition.

    Hopefully didn't come across as too negative. In general probably on par with other large corporations. However, currently falling behind our competition, leadership is currently on a down-slide, but as in everything in GE this can go in cycles and has the ability to improve if becomes a recognized problem.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    - EMS yearly personnel review process has its faults, but I am not surprised by my job security or near term future standing, so please keep it moving forward.
    - Continue to be cooperative with personal issues. Although I have rarely missed time, I fully believe and appreciate that GE would be cooperative if an urgent issue arose.
    - Become involved with outside customers, become involved with projects, make decisions, challenge leaders of other organizations and businesses. Currently are obviously absent, which is greatly hurting a number of projects.
    - Recognize that rank-and-file needs you to be involved to make hard decisions, not just 'engaged' in process. Pushing all of the decision making process down to rank-and-file is leading to easy answers and sub-par products, that is also not going to improve by 'pushing' or 'challenging' the lower levels any further.
    - Reconsider the levels of bureaucracy such as business leaders, technical leaders, chief engineers, consulting engineers, principle engineers, etc. This seems to go up and down over the years, one project 'miss' often spurs a bunch of new teams, leaders, and reviewers, but ultimately this makes the project cost more and take longer with little actual reduction in risk.
    - Develop a long-term strategy. Projects that try to boil the ocean are bound to fail. Incremental steps that lead through a long-term plan is where our competition is beating us. Leaders need to be held accountable to a long-term strategy, not just S2 (yearly project budgeting) pushed up from bottom. It is clear that the boil-the-ocean projects are a reaction to lack of ability to execute in more than one step.

    No opinion of CEO
  2.  

    GE, very good opportunity for intense training. Below market compensation and benefits

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee  in  Atlanta, GA
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Atlanta, GA

    I have been working at GE

    Pros

    Flexible work environment is a positive. No one watches your comings and goings. Very good, comprehensive on the job training. There is a great deal of autonomy.

    Cons

    The salaries are typically below market for the level of responsibility given. Bonuses are reserved for the very small minority. There is very little work/life balance, and it is not a high priority for higher level executives.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Compensation and promotions should be based upon merit, not driven by geographic or diversity metrics established by corporate.

    No opinion of CEO
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