Google

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7 people found this helpful  

I joined Google to innovate and change the world, but found such opportunities to be out of reach.

  • Comp & Benefits
  • Work/Life Balance
  • Senior Management
  • Career Opportunities
Current Employee - Software Engineer III in Mountain View, CA
Current Employee - Software Engineer III in Mountain View, CA

I have been working at Google

Pros

Perks are second to none. Google provides every employee with free food freshly prepared on site each day by professional chefs. Google also provides free transportation to / from work from many areas where employees live. Google also has health care facilities on-site so that employees don't have to spend time driving to the doctor. Google employees can also pay to have their hair cut, get their oil changed, get their dry cleaning done, even get their bicycle repaired all on-site.

Cons

To thrive at Google as a software engineer, at least a Masters degree in computer science or equivalent course of study is needed. A Google employee without a masters degree or Phd will not see the same opportunities for advancement or career development. Some of the technologies used at Google are proprietary, so skills developed in those technologies are not relevant at other tech companies.

Doesn't Recommend
Approves of CEO

2810 Other Employee Reviews for Google (View Most Recent)

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  1. 22 people found this helpful  

    Fast paced, lots of work, lots of reward, smart people, great values and respect.

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Manager, Online Sales & Operations in Mountain View, CA
    Former Employee - Manager, Online Sales & Operations in Mountain View, CA

    I worked at Google

    Pros

    The following is related to sales operations management.
    You'll work with very smart people, and get a lot of support and feedback around doing your best work. Most senior managers have great knowledge, a lot of advice to offer, and value open, transparent communication.
    You'll likely work the hardest you've ever worked at Google, but you'll also be greatly rewarded. Also, Google makes it very easy to work your hardest, and that's a huge bonus if you're interested in super-charging your career.
    Example (day in the life): take free shuttle to work; use available corp vehicles to run daytime errands; grab a hand brewed coffee and gourmet breakfast before starting work; communicate with brightest in your industry during the day; visit a tech-talk and learn something new; workout in the gym w/ a trainer before lunch; have lunch with a colleague at 1 of >15 free themed cafes; grab an espresso shot from the micro-kitchen on way to your desk; collaborate on a new project with someone in a different working group; back to your own work; quick $5 chair massage to rejuvenate; swing by tech-stop on way to grab a new mouse, before your professional desk ergonomic consultation begins; more work; grab gourmet dinner starting at 6:30; woah, it's late - time to go home; grab late (8:30) shuttle home. (I guess i'll have to do my laundry for free at work tomorrow).

    Cons

    Google is changing, and it's experiencing some growing pains.
    There are new projects and focus areas every week, and the grouping of functions and teams changes constantly. As a result, managers are responsible to new macro functional groups, and new projects or focus areas every month or so. This seems an unnecessary distraction, amounting to 25% superfluous work.
    The change in org structure has made it hard to maintain the career path of your choice. Instead, you must choose from available Google-centric career paths. These are not always (or often) composed of conventional roles, since Google is both changing rapidly, and unconventional to begin with.
    Most of the people hired at Google 5+ years ago, don't have the credentials to be hired there today. This complicates internal transfers, even though HR attempts to solve that issue.
    Those joining Google from acquisitions are rarely hirable at Google in any other way, yet their experience and contributions once onboard are typically at par. This again complicates the internal transfer process.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Be more accommodating to veteran Googlers. The company is changing very fast, and they need active guidance to navigate successfully. Active - not reactive.
    Be more direct when providing guidance and mentoring to all managers and direct reports. Google is getting a bit too "careful", and I've found that more managers these days are reluctant to tell it like it is, for fear of appearing undiplomatic. Diplomacy and tact should make a manager a better communicator, not a constrained one.

    Recommends
    Approves of CEO
  2. 3 people found this helpful  

    Great Product, Lousy Management

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Product Manager in Mountain View, CA
    Former Employee - Product Manager in Mountain View, CA

    I worked at Google

    Pros

    Started and worked on amazing products, which turned out to be highly successful.

    Cons

    It became way too political, specially with upper management completely lost its way and lacking a vision.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Listen to people who are good at their jobs and delivering results rather than random 'group' managers and directors.

    No opinion of CEO
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