There are newer employer reviews for Guidebook

4 people found this helpful

Great company and talented people

  • Comp & Benefits
  • Work/Life Balance
  • Senior Management
  • Culture & Values
  • Career Opportunities
Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in Palo Alto, CA
Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in Palo Alto, CA

I worked at Guidebook full-time (more than 3 years)

Pros

I worked for Guidebook for almost 3 years before moving out of the Bay Area so my spouse and I could be closer to our families. In the last 6 months, as Guidebook has experienced more success, they've done a great job adding more benefits (e.g. 401k, better healthcare plans, catered lunched, amazing drinks/snacks, company outings). They've also corrected a lot of the pay issues that a lot of startups suffer from when first getting off the ground. By the time I left my job, I believe I was paid above market rate. The company has a strong culture and managers encourage their team members to continue to develop their skills. Also, now that the company is larger (65 employees at the time I am writing this review), work life balance is much better.

Cons

Though the culture is strong, I think it should be officially spelled out. Also, Guidebook hires a lot of people with 0-2 years of work experience. I think Guidebook would benefit from bringing in a few managers with more experience (say 5-10 years).

Advice to ManagementAdvice

Keep up the good work -- almost everyone I knew at Guidebook was incredibly happy, so try not to change too much as the company continues to grow!

Recommends
Positive Outlook
Approves of CEO
reviews filtered by
  • Any Location
  • Any Job Title
  1. 15 people found this helpful

    Actions speak louder than (false) words.

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in Palo Alto, CA
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in Palo Alto, CA

    I worked at Guidebook full-time

    Pros

    **The sheer volume of positive reactionary reviews (a few of which are almost certainly fake/planted) that popped up LITERALLY overnight in response to a single less-than-stellar review of the company is staggering (and probably says more about the company than any review can express).**

    Just wanted to provide a different perspective, and attempt to offer a balanced review with information that I wish I’d known about Guidebook before I applied. Hope this is helpful to any potential job seekers out there.

    I met some awesome people at Guidebook, many of whom I kept in touch with after I quit. The people were definitely what I looked forward to going into work each day. The two stars are for the great people.

    As mentioned in some of the other reviews, one perk is a stocked snack/kitchen area, which means that you won’t starve (even if you aren’t being paid that well). There is also a wide variety of surrounding food options for both offices.

    There is flexibility to pursue projects that you are interested in, but as others have mentioned, the caveat is that it is completely and totally up to you to wrangle together the resources and time to see them through (I’ve noticed that this frequently comes at the expense of work/life balance).

    There is no limit on vacation/sick time, which is nice, although in retrospect, this is also a smart business move that allows Guidebook to NOT to have to pay out vacation time/balances when people quit.

    Cons

    Compensation is below market rate. There’s no two ways about it. I feel like this was especially true for fresh college grads who lacked negotiation skills and/or were eager/desperate to land a full-time job. I understand that compensation is generally lower at startups, but there is low, and then there is grossly below market rate...

    Emails that went out to certain teams, as well as to the entire company, achieved the exact opposite of the intended effect. Rather than motivating people and making them want to work harder, these emails demoralized and frustrated employees who were already giving 110%.

    For instance, one email that was sent out to the entire company listed a select group of people who were called out as the “hardest” workers. This ended up being rather awkward for the people on the list, and maddening/frustrating for those left off of it. This incident was detrimental to team morale, and made the atmosphere in the office tense/uncomfortable for awhile. I understand that the intent was to motivate the team, but the delivery/execution/tone was completely off-putting and counterproductive. I can only imagine how it must have felt for the people who scanned the list and saw that everyone on their team was listed...except for them. It definitely left a bitter taste in people’s mouths, especially as people grew increasingly frustrated with the low comp and the long hours. The whole thing was ludicrous and demoralizing, and I don’t think a single positive came out of it.

    Communication across teams could use some work. It seems like the sales team is consistently selling features that the engineers can’t reasonably deliver in the promised timeframe.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Treat your employees well. They work hard, and they deserve it. Learn how to motivate employees and make them feel valued. Don’t underpay them just because you can. (As mentioned earlier, this is especially true of new college grads who are eager to land a job. Any job.).

    Be proactive about rewarding people for hard work (it’s one thing to promote this sentiment and another thing entirely to ACT on it). Be more upfront/forthright when asked about raises, promotions, etc. These are probably good long-term retention strategies. If the bottom line is what you truly care about, then you realize that constantly having to train new employees to replace ones who leave after short stints gets to be quite costly.

    Smart employees can and will pick up and leave if they feel like they’re not getting what they deserve. Many have realized their worth and done just that. No need to keep drinking the Koolaid.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Positive Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO
  2. 7 people found this helpful

    Good opportunities, amazing co-workers

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Creative Manager
    Former Employee - Creative Manager

    I worked at Guidebook full-time (more than a year)

    Pros

    Guidebook has a great culture. All of my coworkers were very excited about the product, and worked extremely hard (usually going above&beyond the job description). I was able to pursue projects that interested me, and was even encouraged to do so. The importance of self-sufficiency that someone else here mentioned is very true. It's definitely an environment that allows self-motivated people to thrive.

    Cons

    Hard work is rewarded, but that also means work&life balance is a bit on the fragile side. It's not mandatory to stay late, but a lot of the employees do. There is always a ton of work to be done.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Please increase pay for people who deserve it!

    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    No opinion of CEO
There are newer employer reviews for Guidebook

Work at Guidebook? Share Your Experiences

Guidebook

 
Click to Rate
or

Your response will be removed from the review – this cannot be undone.