Hewlett-Packard

  www.hp.com
  www.hp.com
There are newer employer reviews for Hewlett-Packard

 

Dead Company, Brain Dead Management

  • Comp & Benefits
  • Work/Life Balance
  • Senior Management
  • Culture & Values
  • Career Opportunities
Former Employee - Engineering Director in Plano, TX
Former Employee - Engineering Director in Plano, TX

I worked at Hewlett-Packard full-time (more than 10 years)

Pros

Can't think of a thing. HP acquired my employer, so I didn't choose to work for this broke di** company.

Cons

Aside from the globally known fact that HP has been without a good CEO since the 90's, the list runs for paragraphs.

I'll condense it to this: Out of the companies I have worked for, or even been close to as a partner, or a vendor to, HP is absolutely the worst. We will look back at HP's end, prior to 2020, and wonder how it stayed in business while it self destructed.

Advice to ManagementAdvice

Ray Lane - step down, let investors bring a decent Chairman in. Meg Whitman - face it, you blew it big at eBay and they survived despite you. You don't have what it takes to save HP, so follow Lane into the same sunset and give HP a very tiny chance at surviving.

Doesn't Recommend
Negative Outlook
Disapproves of CEO

9491 Other Employee Reviews for Hewlett-Packard (View Most Recent)

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  1.  

    Lacking in leadership and integrity

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Technical Solutions Representative in Tulsa, OK
    Current Employee - Technical Solutions Representative in Tulsa, OK

    I have been working at Hewlett-Packard full-time (more than 5 years)

    Pros

    Ability to learn about a variety of equipment; Depending on the client that is being supported, you have the potential to learn and work with Windows Server and desktop products; Free MSDN account; Free Microsoft and Adobe software for HP internal use.

    Cons

    Bad leadership on the Service Desk; Some people have incorrect job codes/salaries for their positions, and management refuses to update either one; Unethical practices regarding modifying statistics to meet SLA requirements; Metrics used to measure performance are irrelevant to some jobs.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Pay people what they are worth, and adjust the job codes and salaries of those who aren't making the correct amount for their job responsibilities. There are many agents with incorrect job codes and who are underpaid by at least 25% when compared to fair market salaries for their positions. Veteran agents shouldn't be training new inexperienced employees who are making over 10% more than the experienced veterans. Managers and supervisors need to lead the team rather than having "lead agents" stand in for many of their duties. They also need to stand up for their employees when unfair policies come down the pipeline--this builds trust. The quality of Service Desk employees has degraded over the past few years, and as a result, the atmosphere in the office has as well. The environment is oppressive. The quality mentoring process penalizes agents for inconsequential clerical errors, but leaves important things unchecked such as "Is the problem completely resolved?" or "Did the user have to call back for the same issue?" This results in unfair scores that are indirectly proportional to the level of customer service being provided.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO
  2. 1 person found this helpful  

    Troubled, but still an OK employer

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Software Design Engineer in Fort Collins, CO
    Former Employee - Software Design Engineer in Fort Collins, CO

    I worked at Hewlett-Packard full-time (more than 10 years)

    Pros

    Competent coworkers.
    A legacy of grass-roots values still reflecting the HP Way.
    An enormous patent portfolio.
    Ownership of a large percentage of the IPv4 address space. :-)
    OK (industry-average) salary and benefits that are still better than in many other industries.
    Mid and lower level management that eventually comes around to doing the right thing if it is within their control to do so.
    Great career opportunities for charismatic extroverts who can think logically about technical issues.
    Super-strong international infrastructure, presence in emerging markets.
    Supply chain and channel partner arrangements that leverage high volume and squeeze out competitors' profitability.
    HP allows rehires to accumulate years of service and accompanying benefits across all employment periods.

    Cons

    Unimpressive software products.
    Stratospheric management and the board of directors often do not hold to the HP Way.
    Executives are brought in from outside the company and tend to "ruin" it gradually from the top down.
    Benefits ain't what they used to be.
    HP buys big companies and then lays off a huge percentage of employees (new and old).
    Organizations can have serious localized pathological problems.
    Technical career path only works for certain personality types and leaves other valuable contributors stuck.
    HP promises and expects above average performance but is only willing to provide benefits and salary that match the industry average.
    Even the best managers cannot "fix" the inherently broken ideas of forced ranking and competition for variable performance-based bonuses.
    Old cash-cow cutting-edge innovations like printing technologies, PA-RISC, HP-UX, etc., are no longer such a big deal revenue-wise, or have no future at all.
    Cost-cutting measures that have kept the company competitive have also destroyed its most effective cultural motivations for true innovation. Now HP "invests" in innovation only by buying innovative companies (which then have to conform to HP's own innovation-stifling internal policies).
    Service silos often distribute work to the masses to create huge internal savings (on paper) with no accountability for the loss of productivity they cause throughout the company.
    A top-down emphasis on micromanagement created distrust and demoralization especially during the 1990's and 2000's, and has left management where no one is willing to risk their job to challenge higher-level management. At the individual contributor level, team-work is given lip-service only, and it is usually inadvertently punished instead of rewarded.
    Lose-lose decisions: an example is the acquisition of Palm followed by the subsequent departure from the smart-phone and tablet markets (which left Palm, HP, and especially the consumers and Palm-fans all at a huge loss).
    Many executive decisions have compromised the company's long-term health for short-term gains.
    Too many and too-foolish company acquisitions.
    Leo's decision to spin off the PC biz.
    The company has more money than it can figure out how to handle well.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Re-read The HP Way again..

    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO
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