Honeywell

  www.honeywell.com
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1678 Employee Reviews (View Most Recent)

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Good Company,

  • Comp & Benefits
  • Work/Life Balance
  • Senior Management
  • Culture & Values
  • Career Opportunities
Current Employee - Design Eng  in  Redmond, WA
Current Employee - Design Eng in Redmond, WA

Pros

Great 401K, Great Pension plan, Laid-back workplace

Cons

No bonus at all, No OT for exempt employees, Some managers (Certification) are not familiar with Aerospace process, No Merit increase

Advice to ManagementAdvice

Listen to your employees, Stop squeezing them to do more with less, Directors never listen to employees

Recommends
Positive Outlook
Disapproves of CEO

Other reviews for Honeywell

  1.  

    Great Company Good Hours Great Management

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Machine Operator  in  Dallas, TX
    Current Employee - Machine Operator in Dallas, TX

    Pros

    Safety, Stability, Loacation, Career Advancement

    Cons

    Health Benefits, Pay Compensation and Working Conditions

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Reward longtime workers with better more competitive salaries and benefits

    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO
  2. 3 people found this helpful  

    The bureaucracy, management and performance review antics are mind-numbing

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Former Engineer  in  Kansas City, MO
    Former Employee - Former Engineer in Kansas City, MO

    Pros

    Work-life balance, felxible hours, 401K and a competitive salary when hired were all very favorable. You are typically provided a mentor when hired due to the unique nature of the work.

    Cons

    There is a corporate agenda at Honeywell FM&T to step up the pace and eliminate personnel annually through the performance review process and then proceed to replace those individuals. Regardless if you have a 100% high-performing group, approximately 10% (standard Bell curve) will be delivered a less than desirable performance review, whether or not deserved, resulting in a Performance Improvement Plan (PIP) when placed in the lower right elbow of the 9 block. Then, approximately 3 to 4% of those people will be walked out the door after completed. Every year, management comes together to discuss employee placement in the 9 block. The 9 block placement does not grade you as just an individual, but how you perform against the people in your group with the same title and across the entire organization.

    Of the chosen pool, there are people who will not survive regardless of how well they perform to the PIP. Senior Management unfortunately does not challenge their first-level managers even if they deserve to be challenged. If the PIP becomes a formality because the first-level manager has already made up their mind, there is a minimal chance of surviving even if the expectations of the PIP are fulfilled. Several people have been targeted (not because they were lousy employees), and as a result, their lives were made miserable in the process. There have been several people who were very well respected in the work community, but were still eliminated. In addition, there have been a couple managers who actually went to bat for their employees and lost because the quota to walk people out the door had not yet been fulfilled for the year.

    For those of us who could have conquered the impossible, at the end of the day, it would not have altered the outcome. When there were well-deserved accolades, some of our managers would either never acknowledge them or slant them in negative light. There were even times when comments were made which were quite frankly inaccurate and/or made up. Next, is it acceptable to deliver a PIP with a 30 day requirement to a person the day they return to work from an approved short-term disability? And when they request some time to regain their bearings after being out of the office for several months, they were denied accommodations. Then, to learn the PIP was actually finalized while the employee was on disability, in addition to it having an insurmountable intent. After the PIP was completed, being told the expectations were fulfilled and then several months later being told they had failed. After all this, having false accusations and mandates made by the first-level manager, and finally, when brought to HR's attention as being retaliatory, they were disregarded. HR's existence at FM&T is not to assist in protecting the employees, but to side with the managers.

    Morale is very low at FM&T due to the unfavorable treatment of their employees. People are scared when it comes to performance review time because they question whether or not their turn has arrived to be considered a poor performer. Hunkering down, keeping your head low and just trying to survive does not result in a positive attitude.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Performance reviews of the managers should include the voice of their employees. There would be much to gain and learn from utilizing this method if the employees had a voice in how their managers are rated. At times, Senior Management remains uninformed to how their first-level managers are truly treating their employees due to the possible repercussion of speaking up!

    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    No opinion of CEO
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