Honeywell

www.honeywell.com
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2 people found this helpful  

Limited job growth, not always employee friendly

  • Comp & Benefits
  • Work/Life Balance
  • Senior Management
  • Culture & Values
  • Career Opportunities
Former Employee - Oper Associate III in Glendale, AZ
Former Employee - Oper Associate III in Glendale, AZ

I worked at Honeywell full-time (more than 10 years)

Pros

Large Organization, known world wide

Cons

Limited job growth, not always employee friendly

Advice to ManagementAdvice

expand chances for job growth

Recommends
Neutral Outlook
Disapproves of CEO

1915 Other Employee Reviews for Honeywell (View Most Recent)

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  1. 2 people found this helpful  

    Not bad, but common big business pitfalls

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Engineer in South Bend, IN
    Current Employee - Engineer in South Bend, IN

    I have been working at Honeywell full-time (more than 5 years)

    Pros

    Decent salary, low stress level, work tends to be on and off at the start and end of the day with little carry over. Once in, access to internal job postings.

    Cons

    Benefits shrinking rapidly. 401K used to be the best in the business and is now mediocre. Raises are cut this year due to a "bad economy" even though almost no other businesses are doing that and our stock is as high as its ever been. Standard GE review style where someone has to be at the bottom isn't great. Lots of big ideas and programs that don't end up going anywhere.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Get rid of the new age MBAs. They're pushing everything to driving next quarter profits rather than investing in good products, employees, and the long term. If we could invest all of our cash for a year or two and make our customers happy we'd be on top of the industry again like we once were.

    Recommends
    Negative Outlook
    Approves of CEO
  2. 9 people found this helpful  

    Failure to Follow Their Own 12 Behaviors

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Engineering in Phoenix, AZ
    Former Employee - Engineering in Phoenix, AZ

    I worked at Honeywell full-time (more than 3 years)

    Pros

    Worked with some outstanding engineers and technicians. Good 401K and a marginal benefits package.

    Cons

    The people who have been with Honeywell through all the changes have seen the company go from one of the most desirable places in Phoenix to work to a company that has no respect for their employees and no representation from the so called human resources office. With an aging workforce of retirement aged manpower of that which encompasses over 60% of the current workforce it will be interesting to see how they survive.

    Working in one of the so-called elite departments of Honeywell it was badly managed. This department released 75% of their workforce with many technicians having 25 years or more walked out the door from a manager who had been with Honeywell less than a couple years. And had never turned a wrench or picked up a multimeter in his time of service with Honeywell.

    Employees were taking the blame on projects not meeting deadlines because management failed to listen to the employee who the manager assigned to that project. Many times the employee was not involved in any form of an engineering review meeting for their inputs of the newly assigned project. They were never asked what they projected for a length of time and how many man hours would be needed to complete this project. Many times if you did voice yoru concerns this was seen as a bad attitude on the part of the technician, management was never wrong.

    Managers would hand out projects that would surpass hundreds of thousands of dollars to build, yet this was all done without any form of an engineering review process. A project that exceeded a cost of $10,000.00 in most companies had at least 2 people reviewing this project to provide an estimation of time and cost to build and to review the whole scope of the project to review it for any problems. There was no set standard for doing any task, if you had to build a wire harness with 100 wires terminated on each end, some single wires and other triple shielded wires there was no standard used to provide a proper estimation of hours and cost to even strip a single wire and terminate it.

    When projects were in jeopardy of not meeting a deadline the employee paid the price. The manager called you into his office and expected a full explanation even if this project was first assigned to another technician and then passed onto you. If the first technician estimated the job wrong the second technician took the fall for this failure. Your manager would then tell you that you are now approved to work 70 hours a week. If you did not work the overtime and the project failed to meet the deadline this was reflected on your review as substandard performance.

    One week we are working 70 hours and the next our hours cut to 36. Because of the location of where our shop was located on the campus the hourly charge for a technician from the shop was $140 per hour. It did not matter if the task was to replace a fuse or build a whole test cell the hourly charge was the same. There was no consideration from Honeywell for the technicians to save their jobs and move the shop to a cheaper piece of real estate. Again the technicians paid the price for this, even though it was no fault of theirs they were forced to send work to the Honeywell facility in Mexico and now Puerto Rico. Projects sent to Mexico often were sent back to Arizona with problems. Once again the technician had to troubleshoot this and repair it while management complained that the project was over-budget and the blame placed upon the technician. Over 700 machinist jobs and support personal were cut when Honeywell sent those jobs to Mexico and Czechoslovakia. Again no respect to an employee who has spent the better part of their working life for a company then shown the door.

    Carrer advancement was an excuse, there was none. If you did not call in sick during the year you got a $140 dollar bonus at the end of the year and a pizza party and a trophy to have. The math did not add up, at $25/hr for $1000.00 for 5 days and you get a bonus of $140.00. You could not take vacations at the beginning or end of the month. This was a problem with coworkers who had 4 or 5 weeks of vacation and you a new employee with 2 weeks and an under-staffed shop and then the days you could use it were mandated by management when you were allowed to take your earned vacation. And you had to find a coworker to accept your project too while you were away and then send out a email to all your customers, set up your outlook and voicemail even if this was for a single day...or your boss would call you into his office and have a closed door talk.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Your skip level meetings were an excuse to weed out the people who did not kiss up to your position. You do not need to threaten a person with their job thrown in their face but you need to be involved and really see where the problems are.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO
There are newer employer reviews for Honeywell

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