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4 people found this helpful  

IATA looks great on the outside and that is just about it!

  • Comp & Benefits
  • Work/Life Balance
  • Senior Management
  • Career Opportunities
Former Employee - Administrative Assistant in Montreal, QC (Canada)
Former Employee - Administrative Assistant in Montreal, QC (Canada)

I worked at IATA

Pros

It is true that the opportunity to interact with many different cultures and people is what attracted me to work for IATA. When I studied Tourism IATA was glorified as the place to be so I jumped at the chance to get in.

Cons

Things were great at first and then they turned sour. If you left at 5:00 p.m. you were not a team player. If you took your lunch you were not a team player. If you are a female and you get pregnant - watch out because if you have a family your bosses get upset because they see having a family results in your focus will be redirected from your work.

The values that IATA praise themselves on were just that - words because IATA does not put ANY of those values into practice. They throw around that they are non profit and that they should cut costs but then they host a breakfast and order $2,000 in muffins and coffee (I processed that invoice). They have their staff travel in Economy and then then the VP is on the same flight in Executive class, what an example.

At one point they were soliciting West Jet to join their ranks but they refused, no wonder there why!

The A, B and C rating system is also the biggest crap I have ever seen. You work and give more than 110% only to be told that there is only the budget to give three people on your floor a raise so you won't qualify. When you complain they throw the non profit in your face again and also tell you that if you don't like it you can leave because no one is putting a gun to your head to stay.

My job was abolished and towards the end they played games with me on paying my severance package... they knew and I knew that they would have no "other" job for me but they put on the stall tactics every time I inquired about my "position" or "package". Every time I had a meeting to meet with them it would be canceled at the last minute.

I worked in SO&I and I disagree that there is no stress there. You have the so called VP walking around reigning terror to everyone who does not bow down to him. This so called VP does not know anything about SO&I unless he gets a brief and even then he looks foolish. He could not get out of it when they had a Security Forum in Asia. When he started being asked questions he should know and he didn't he blasted his team later about not being briefed regardless of the fact that what he was asking was things he should know!

You are also threatened with your job if things aren't done at ridiculous deadlines. usually last minute of course. Since his last "Assistant" (and I use that word loosely because she did not know anything) left (and why she left is another questionable issue because with all the administrative assistants being abolished her slave army of people who were doing all her work would be gone) no one works for him for more than a few months.

This VP has no social skills he is a barbarian. He tried to get out and move to Austrian airlines and they would not even take him because they know who he is. I stood up to him and that is why I was abolished because I was "too opinionated" - I left with my dignity in tact because he did not intimidate me.

I met great people and I am in touch with many today. The organization right now is full of bad apples and unfortunately they sit at the top.

Right now I am at an organization that appreciates me, rewards me and I am valued. It took awhile to get used to that because after all the crap I went through at IATA I was always waiting for the other shoe to drop negatively.

I must say that IATA's benefits were outstanding even though it was scaled down when I left. The pension plan is also decent but that is another issue because many staff are kicked out when they were close to retirement because they were seen as expensive to maintain. What was that main value again IATA goes on and on about? Oh yah, WE PUT PEOPLE FIRST.

Advice to ManagementAdvice

Practice what the company preaches! The "iATA" values would be a great start!

Doesn't Recommend

64 Other Employee Reviews for IATA (View Most Recent)

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  1. 5 people found this helpful  

    IATA - Don't go there now, but wait until after the smoke and mirrors disappear in a few years.

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Manager in Montreal, QC (Canada)
    Former Employee - Manager in Montreal, QC (Canada)

    I worked at IATA

    Pros

    One of the most attractive draws to IATA is the nature of the association - you will interact with people from all over the world. The association represents over 250 airlines in over 100-some countries and naturally you have an instant network of colleagues and coworkers to work with. Great friendships can be made across borders, time zones, cultures and religions. Even after leaving IATA, many former employees remain in touch and their friendships last indefinitely. As a non-airline industry person, I learned a LOT about the industry and IATA was certainly a fascinating place to learn from such a diverse group of colleagues - many of whom come from the airlines and are willing to share their knowledge. Tip: If you can work in the Safety, Operations & Infrastructure (SOI) division, you'll be exempt from some of the stresses and revenue pressure I've identified in the next question. The SOI division isn't accountable to revenues like the Commercial Division is. If you are lucky enough to work in the SOI division, you'll be doing good things to advance the mission of safety and quality assurance (maintenance) across the world. That group has made considerable success towards operational safety audit standards (IOSA) which is used now by some governments to ensure their country's airlines are safe.

    Cons

    There is a ridiculous focus on driving excessive revenues and meeting outrageous revenue targets, which increase year-over-year across-the-board (arbitrary X% increase, maybe?), despite the substantial losses IATA themselves are focusing on in the industry. It's a fascinating case study - the trade association is publically drawing attention to the number of airline shutting down and the losses they are incurring (millions of dollars a day in any currency). At the same time, they are pushing their products, services and consultancy on the industry and their staff have to meet these sales targets. If the air transport industry is losing so much money, they won't have any money to spend to buy things from IATA. And remember that IATA is a membership based NON-PROFIT. Shouldn't they be helping their member airlines get into better shape? I may not come from an airline background, but isn't this common business sense? Too much stress can be attributed to the focus on budgets, targets, revenues. It's all about meeting numbers. It's too bad that the commercial focus seems to overshadow the true intent of a membership-based trade association. The only thing IATA deserves good press for is the IOSA safety audits (see above question) and the people behind that initiative. They care about safety, not just about making a quick sale.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    IATA is micro-managed by three guys at the top. They focus too much on GE and Jack Welch, and Managers are forced into pidgeon-holing staff into three groups - A, B and C employees. People are people - not finite letters of the alphabet who can be put into one black-or-white-only rating. When a Manager has a good group of employees, you shouldn't have to force them into such a rating. Square pegs do not fit into round holes. The other concern that bothered me was the excessive amount of promotion of "values" and other slick marketing stuff from the HR folks - but yet their regular dismissal of good staff often contradicted such values. If an employee needs more training or isn't a perfect fit, give them training and/or tools to get them where they need to be. Don't just terminate them and wreck their lives. They're people, and people are not indispensable resources. Also - too many signatures are required on company documents. The CEO seems to sign EVERYTHING - that doesn't send a nice message to staff (think: "I don't trust your decisions, so I have to sign off on everything to micromanage decisions). Business gets slowed down as a result.

    Doesn't Recommend
  2. 5 people found this helpful  

    Great colleagues, detached leadership.

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in Montreal, QC (Canada)
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in Montreal, QC (Canada)

    I worked at IATA

    Pros

    Some of the finest people in the aviation industry work in this organization. It's a unique chance to work with people from various countries sharing a common interest in aviation. It's a unique chance to interface with airlines the world over. Good compensation with a good benefits package.

    Cons

    IATA is a highly political organization wanting to be a lobby for world airlines and a profitable company at the same time. Goals were set taking into account the needs of the organisation, but not the reality of the market place. Projects were green lighted with little or no research. In spite of the "One IATA" philosophy, information was kept from others in the organization. Human Capital (Human Resources) did its very best to discourage internal growth opportunities, preferring outside hires than looking for talent within, other policies included making staff compete with each other in order to get good performance reviews. Morale was low due which lead to high turnover.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Reform Human Resource policies, begin looking more within the organisation for professional advancement. It does happen, but too rarely. Many of my colleagues and myself left because other organisations offered advancement. Now with another organisation, I can see what advancement means. Professional reviews should be reformed so that employees get their true grade, not a grade determined by unrealistic quotas.

    Doesn't Recommend
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