Journeys shoes

www.journeys.com
There are newer employer reviews for Journeys shoes

1 person found this helpful  

Time consuming, routine.

  • Comp & Benefits
  • Work/Life Balance
  • Senior Management
  • Career Opportunities
Current Employee - Store Manager
Current Employee - Store Manager

I have been working at Journeys shoes

Pros

Lots of opportunity to move up to upper management. You learn so much about your product in order to sell. It's a very fast paced company, you're rarely bored unless you're in a lower volume store. Praise is usually given where necessary depending on who your district manager is. Commission based pay, also so more incentive to sell. Your teachers are the people who you keep in touch with, they are always there to help you even if you're in a different store. Depending on your location you meet a lot of cool new people. You're always socializing with people whether It's about shoes or not. Journeys employees stay loyal to their first managers or whoever trains them.

Cons

You are expected to work long hours. For management if you can't handle 50 to 60 hour normal work weeks, and 70 to 80 hour work weeks during the holidays you won't make it as management. There is a lot of unnecessary pressure on employees to make sales goals. If you don't make your goal for a certain period of time you will be terminated (even management). Very young managers and district managers, sometimes they are so scatter brained they have no idea what they're doing. Work load takes a toll especially with very few days off which ultimately makes sales worse. It's a vicious circle. Not a whole lot of communication goes on between district managers and store managers. They can tell you you're doing something wrong but wont give you the tools or advice to fix it.

Advice to ManagementAdvice

Don't randomly promote store managers to DM, unless they are completely fit for the job. Not just because they were sale monsters. They won't be selling as a DM so that won't make them better as a DM.

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232 Other Employee Reviews for Journeys shoes (View Most Recent)

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  1. 2 people found this helpful  

    Apply somewhere else

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Sales Associate
    Current Employee - Sales Associate

    I have been working at Journeys shoes

    Pros

    The discount is cool and the atmosphere is pretty relaxed. Other than that, Journeys is a terrible place to work.

    Cons

    Where do I even begin..

    1. Journeys sets 2 goals for you to hit. First is your daily sales goal, which is usually pretty easy to hit if you know how to sell shoes. The second is your SOPs (Standards of performance) where a certain percentage of your total sales have to be from socks, accessories like t-shirts and wallets, and multis (selling more than 1 pair of shoes in a single transaction). If you don't hit your SOPs your hours will be cut or you will be fired and they make this point brutally clear. For example, I sold almost $7k last month alone but didn't hit any of my SOPs because it's based on percentage. It's much harder to make 10% of your sales come from socks when you're selling thousands rather than hundreds of dollars each month. Because of this, I've had my hours drastically cut. Another issue with SOPs is with management. Managers will work until they hit all of their SOPs and sometimes their sales goal, and then stop so they don't mess up their percentages. Once they hit their goals, they defer a lot of their small, single shoe sales to the sales associates, messing up their percentages instead of their own. And you're punished for it. Essentially, you're punished if you don't sell enough and you're punished if you sell too much of the wrong thing.

    2. There is absolutely no such thing as a pay raise when working at journeys. Management told me if I wanted a pay raise to get promoted. Which is fine, if they'd actually promote from within. In the last 2 months, we've had 1 new manager and 2 new co-managers brought in as new hires instead of promoting sales associates.

    3. They make it very clear that you are expendable. Threats of being fired are tossed around for any and every mistake you make. A co-woker I befriended had his hours cut to where he wasn't even scheduled for a month because he was $42 off of his monthly sales goal until he was finally "let go".

    4. Management finds any possible way to defer responsibility to their sales associates. For example, they recently started a policy where sales associates are "in charge" of certain sections of the sales floor. They expect these sections to be perfectly displayed and have the correct price and stock number on every pair of shoes. However, the shoes on the sales floor also get sold, leaving holes in the display that need to be filled. If you're not working that day, some one else has to fill that hole and if they mess it up, you will be the one responsible. Managers are not assigned a section so even if they're the one who filled the hole incorrectly, you will be the one who get's written up, not them.

    5. Sales associates essentially never see a commission. At journeys, you make either your hourly wage or your 4% commission. I make minimum wage ($7.25) which means I have to sell $181 per hour every hour to even see commission. Managers, however, are paid a base wage and their commission so they steal sales from associates all the time, especially socks and accessories sales.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    1. "four on the floor" is stupid and doesn't work. It only wastes time finding 3 extra shoes to bring out and creates a lot of drag (shoes that need to be returned to the shelves). Also, managers do not help with drag, leaving you to clean up after their failed attempts to sell shoes the customer didn't ask for.

    2. Stop hiring managers straight out of high school. The managers I work with are both fresh out of high school and flex their power every chance they get.

    3. Stop seeing sales associates as nothing more than cheap expendable labor.

    Doesn't Recommend
  2.  

    Unique.. but not always a good thing

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I have been working at Journeys shoes

    Pros

    The culture of Journeys is very enjoyable on a non-sales level. They allow for a very laid back atmosphere while still having a very competitive edge to make work fun. The discount is very generous especially considering it can be used on sale merchandise. The company is not against promotion of young individuals, which allows great opportunities for experience. Health benefits are wonderful too. The monthly rate isn't terrible, but the coverage is amazing.

    Cons

    Two words sum it up: Sales aggressive!
    Sales plans on stores that have already gained massive in previous year make achieving goal and bonuses very difficult. Upper management awards stores that do far less volume with higher percents better than stores that do far more with less of a percent in gain (which can be impossible when plan is based on last years trend which at some stores can be abnormally high). The environment creates a hostile environment at times among management, as it is a commission based job. Being sales men, compensation is HIGHLY bluffed while pay plans are presented. Without question, Journeys does not pay competitively for the amount of time invested. While they preach integrity, I highly question it's ethical positions. I also feel it is hard to trust management above a store level, as their agenda is always unknown, and it changes from manager to manager. Also, management forfeits their life outside of work. While I myself am I die hard workaholic, having no quality to my life outside of work kills.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Value your management better. Success does not only come from amazing salesmen but from strong management. More focus should be put into a base pay compensation and less weighted on commission. There should be more focus on growth of individuals and the team, versus sole focus on sales. (Email pep talks is not the way to fix this either). Having the right team, allowing all employees (including part time where commission is not a factor in pay) to sell, builds the right sales environment and meeting sales goals will still be attainable. This is all stuff one learns in a basic college level management course, these ideas should not seem so foreign to senior management.

There are newer employer reviews for Journeys shoes

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