Kaiser Permanente

www.kaiserpermanente.org
Employer Engaged
There are newer employer reviews for Kaiser Permanente

1 person found this helpful  

IT Professional - improve management and delivery of IT services to support all KP business units.

  • Comp & Benefits
  • Work/Life Balance
  • Senior Management
  • Culture & Values
  • Career Opportunities
Current Employee - Manager in Pleasanton, CA
Current Employee - Manager in Pleasanton, CA

I have been working at Kaiser Permanente full-time (more than 5 years)

Pros

Immense opportunity to improve entire IT landscape through technology investments, operational improvements, and strategic planning with business partners.

Cons

1) The antiquated federated organization model and generally weak IT executive leadership make it difficult to achieve cost effective change across all IT portfolios. 2) Poor relationship with KP business units an Medical groups create unnecessary conflicts.

Advice to ManagementAdvice

Sharpen executive oversight of KPIT organization.

Doesn't Recommend
Negative Outlook
Approves of CEO

1933 Other Employee Reviews for Kaiser Permanente (View Most Recent)

Sort: Rating Date
  1.  

    very unique

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Pharmacy Clerk in Livermore, CA
    Current Employee - Pharmacy Clerk in Livermore, CA

    I have been working at Kaiser Permanente full-time (more than 5 years)

    Pros

    Big company, awesome benefits, and great pay.

    Cons

    Communication is scattered throughout the company.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Everyone understands the goals, but strategies differ.

    Recommends
    Negative Outlook
    No opinion of CEO
  2. 6 people found this helpful  

    Life at KP

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - One of the 'little People' in Pasadena, CA
    Current Employee - One of the 'little People' in Pasadena, CA

    I have been working at Kaiser Permanente full-time (more than 10 years)

    Pros

    People fortunate to work here love working here because the benefits are exceptional, Let's start with vacation - most companies feel it's generous to give three weeks of paid vacation. At KP you start with that or a smidge more and accrue with years worked. When I left I had 7.5 weeks of paid vacation. How many other employers in the US offer that? Because it's an HMO you get comprehensive health care, that begins as soon as you're hired, and if you work there long enough, your health care will be there after you reach 65. The pay is very comparable and they compensate you financially quite fairly and even generously. If you happen to be part of management, you are compensated even greater. Not many company have pensions they can offer you but KP still has that and you get vested rather quickly for it. Again, people want to work for this company because it still has excellent benefits, even compared to its earlier years when the benefits were beyond stellar. This is why Kaiser Permanente holds on to its work force because the grass isn't greener next door at least financially and benefits wise.

    Cons

    Like any business you are employed at, much has to do with the environment. Kaiser Permanente is your typical corporate structure that is both macro and micro. Macro in a bad sense that you feel you are barely a cog in the massive system that makes it work. Micro in the sense that in the end you're still dealing with people who can be pernicious, petty, vengeful, spiteful and these are your supervisors, managers, management and at times your co-workers. Kaiser Permanente promotes its work environment as positive but it is anything but that, especially if you have horrible bosses which is the norm and not the exception. As a corporation that works dutifully to cultivate its public perception, the reality is that KP is not remotely close to its 'spin.' If KP was such a great place to work for, other than benefits, than how you can explain why its own employment assistance program (EAP) and other mental wellness programs are overwhelmed by its own employees. It's not a healthy place to work, even though it promotes that 'healthy' message to its customer base. Both upper and lower management is incredibly inept and is rewarded for being so, and again. People continue to work there because the benefits are the only thing that keeps it bearable and the fact the job market is super bleak. Again, I only recommend Kaiser Permanente as a place to work because the benefits are very good but that is changing - so get in while those benefits exist and be prepared to be supervised and managed by someone who should never been made a manager or supervisor ever.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    This is what I would say to any corporate CEO, CFO, president, those who really have the power to change their companies - quit making the little people as accountable as the people who are managing/supervising them. 'We' 'little people' will walk through a wall if we are managed by people we know are competent and treat us respectfully. Making us, the little people, attend mandatory Team building exercises or that other 'rah rah', 'you make a difference' and whatever trendy better workforce system and seminars is pointless and demeaning. Don't punish the 'arm' for what the 'hand' does. If anyone needs more training to be better at their jobs, it's management. Quit spewing the lies that input from the lowest of employees matters. Be realistic about why people, who aren't management, work for you. Work on your managers and supervisors to be better people first and then better managers and supervisors. Use common sense and quit bringing in consultants to figure out why things don't work when everyone already knows why it's not working, especially since the first course of action is micromanagement which never works. Management needs to quit hiding behind any facade where it's 'business' when dealing with those they manage. Truth is, it's not 'business' but it's 'personal' and because it's personal, any management clarity and neutrality is lost. Quit making the little people fill out surveys on how the company can improve and quit telling people it's anonymous. No non management employees believe their input is valued or anonymous. It seems these surveys are more of a tool to weed out the malcontents and anyone who values their job, tows the corporate line. Everyone knows, management wants to laud itself and does take credit of an idea submitted by a lowly employee. Also to management, maybe your business wouldn't get sued as much as it does if your human resources department was just an extension of everything wrong with your company in the first place. Quit calling it 'human' resources and call it what it really is, 'business preservation' or 'business enforcement' resources. Most people have actual/real cause when they go to HR but then are immediately treated as a pariah or 'trouble for the company.' Quit punishing the employees when it's management that is mostly at fault. You, management, spend too many resources to avoid staring reality in the face. Again, all that team building crap or worker improvement seminars, seriously - focus on the people leading your teams and improve those people and let the employees, if competent and good at what they do, continue. Quit rewarding incompetent managers and punishing those working under them for their manager's incompetence. Punish and remove managers who are reactionary extremists for their own incompetence. Last, get rid of performance evaluations and appraisals except for top management. Performance evaluations/appraisals are a waste of time and the same input is rewritten over and over with just more embellishment than actual meaningful content. It's just a waste of resources, energy, and if a manager dislikes someone working under them, just another opportunity to exploit that person. If you do your diligence and bring in capable people in the first place, quit questioning their capability, wasting their time, by undermining them and making them prove their worth in a means that doesn't quantify or record it accurately or at all. If these horrible things have to exist, can we at least make them check boxes or true and false and be allowed to write in 'real' answers to questions as stupid as, 'Please list your accomplishments for this year' to someone who does the same minor thing over and over to, 'I still have a job and am grateful for it.' The only pertinent questions that is ever asked is more or less how can you improve what you do and that is relevant. However, the majority of questions are inane and inapplicable like 'Stretch Goals' and how can you save this company and the world type questions. There are never questions that might actually make sense for someone so far on the low end of the corporate structure. Performance evaluations and appraisals were created by bad management who don't have the cognitive skills to see what's actually happening in real time and need to assuage them of their own incompetence as managers.

    Recommends
    Negative Outlook
    No opinion of CEO
There are newer employer reviews for Kaiser Permanente

Work at Kaiser Permanente? Share Your Experiences

Kaiser Permanente

 
Click to Rate
or

Your response will be removed from the review – this cannot be undone.