There are newer employer reviews for Kinder Morgan

Good Company

  • Comp & Benefits
  • Work/Life Balance
  • Senior Management
  • Culture & Values
  • Career Opportunities
Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
Current Employee - Anonymous Employee

I have been working at Kinder Morgan full-time (more than 5 years)

Pros

Good Benefits, lots of opportunity.

Cons

It's a relatively new company, and the culture is still developing.

Recommends
Positive Outlook
Approves of CEO
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  1. 1 person found this helpful

    Good place to start

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Controller/Scheduler in Pasadena, TX
    Current Employee - Controller/Scheduler in Pasadena, TX

    I have been working at Kinder Morgan full-time (more than a year)

    Pros

    New management is extremely safety focused. Company sticks to its core values across the board. Growing company with a secure future.

    Cons

    Overworked and underpaid, standard for most large businesses. High turnover rate means more overtime and more stress at work. Lack of advancement opportunity. Some management has inadequate management training so they treat their employees poorly.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Figure out why people are leaving and fix it (hint: more money).

    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO
  2. Incompetence, unprofessionalism, short-sightedness and self-preserving focus are just some of the major problems.

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I have been working at Kinder Morgan full-time (more than 3 years)

    Pros

    The health insurance benefits are good. There are a lot of examples of what not to do, which can be a very valuable learning tool.

    Cons

    The management in the Lower River Region is incompetent. There is no planning, no communication and the managers are primarily focussed on preserving their careers at all costs. Initiative is discouraged, yet there is no guidance to direct progress. When employees have to take initiative due largely to a "tenured" employee shirking their responsibility, that task suddenly becomes the responsibility of the initiative-taker. There is no effort to retrain the ineffective employee or define work responsibilities and hold employees accountable to specific, defined responsibilities. Employees at the lower levels are treated with disdain and animosity when they point out unsafe or inefficient processes or equipment. When something does go wrong, efforts are directed at blaming a low level employee who can be made into a scapegoat and summarily dismissed. There is no significant root-cause analysis conducted, and when it is, the reports are editted to ensure no blame or responsibility falls on the shoulders of the senior reporting managers. Most of the terminals in the lower river region were previously, "Mom-and-Pop," terminals. Consequently, there are a lot of different programs, policies and procedures in place. Maintenance programs are typically ineffective if they exist at all. Work flow and inter-department communication is negligible. There is no effort to create any kind of process standardization. Kinder Morgan, in response to threats of disciplinary action from the EPA, put together a Terminal Asset Group (TAG) that was supposed to standardize equipment, policies and procedures throughout the Bulk and Liquid Terminals. But, as with most things derived from regulatory threat, it has largely fallen by the wayside; giving way to profit margin and management bonus pressures (It is understood that the EPA will not take serious action against a $100 billion energy company). While the upper executive branch puts out well-documented statements calling for quality focus, customer care and above all safety, these seem to only serve the purpose of making sure the Kinder Morgan legal team has a sufficient stack of documentation proving their executives are not liable for the actions of the employees. These philosophical guidelines are never expounded upon or broken down into cogent processes, policies or procedures.

    This is a very frustrating place to work. If you have any other options I suggest you strongly consider them. This is a good stop-gap measure for a pay-check and that is about it, certainly not a serious contender for a career.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Seriously analyze your unit level managers. If you do seriously want to change your company you need to analyze the low level managers. Most of them do not know that they don't know. You need to teach them what you expect and show them what they are doing wrong. You need to teach them how to think more than 1 step ahead, how to plan, prioritize and communicate. The most disturbing fall-back answer indicative of an issue is the management response, "well, we've always done it this way." If you have identified the need for change, yet your implementers are doing it the same way they always have, how can you change? You should request a 5-year plan from all terminal managers. Ensure that they are building to that plan as much as they can with each incremental plant change. Scrutinize 5 to 10 major items on their budgets. Really audit a critical item or two, especially one that needs any kind of repair or maintenance. Audit an RMP item getting loaded or unloaded. Your current auditors either are not doing their job, or do not know what they are supposed to be looking at. Update the purchasing software and put in place standardized maintenance/work order/variance software. Right now people are still working off of carbon paper! Identify general work-flow process that you want and request area and or terminal managers to flesh it out. Right now everyone does and tracks everything differently. Standardize your engineering designs and ensure that your projects are building to that design. Maybe have your major projects group audit a big small project item. Talk to your department managers about which terminals are or are not listening to their guidance. A purchasing department executive told a terminal manager how to change unit policies to conform to Kinder Morgan corporate policies without bogging down the system as much as he had and he completely ignored her guidance. Hold commercial accountable for communicating customer needs or requests to operations and engineering departments. Audit a managers' meeting and ensure that it is productive. If not, specifically counsel the managers on productive communications. Ask about specific meetings, when are they held, what is/was discussed, what actions came out of it. This is not micromanagement when you have indication of such incompetence among your management personnel.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
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