There are newer employer reviews for Lockheed Martin
There are newer employer reviews for Lockheed Martin

See Most Recent

Satellite Systems Engineer.. 18 month sting and OUT....

  • Work/Life Balance
  • Culture & Values
  • Career Opportunities
  • Comp & Benefits
  • Senior Management
Current Employee - Satellite Systems Engineer in Springfield, VA
Current Employee - Satellite Systems Engineer in Springfield, VA
Recommends
No opinion of CEO

I have been working at Lockheed Martin full-time (More than a year)

Pros

Security Clearance Great pay out of undergrad (because of shift differential) Lots of other young/recent grads Smart people Advancement opportunities (if you like satellite operations) NEVER bring work home with you - you'll go to jail if you do! 8 hours per day... and that's it!! Great hours/benefits

Cons

Shift Schedule - The rotating shift schedule was tough. It's hard for some to stay healthy becuase of the hours, eating habits, etc. And bye bye to half your weekends! The company is HUGE and obviously pretty silo-ed. If you want to go somewhere else after your 18th month stint it's not like your boss can call his buddy over in a different business unit to help you out. I thought the work was incredibly boring. Many of my peers LOVED it and wanted to stay in highly technical satellite operations for the rest of the career, never seeing the light of day, traveling, etc. I think I'm almost too much of a mover/shaker for a job like this.

Other Employee Reviews for Lockheed Martin

  1. Helpful (6)

    Where brain cells go to die...

    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Senior Electrical Engineer in Orlando, FL
    Current Employee - Senior Electrical Engineer in Orlando, FL
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I have been working at Lockheed Martin full-time (More than 10 years)

    Pros

    The compensation is good for the Orlando, FL area and the 401k matching is good. There is a pension plan, which is not available for new employees, but it is still one of the few employers that offered a pension plan in recent years. There area few technical classes taught in-house and tuition reimbursement.

    Cons

    Lockheed Martin Missiles and Fire Control (MFC) is far behind the technological advances of the last 10 or 20 years. The job of the average engineer is to generate paperwork to maintain or make updates to an existing line of "tried and true" products. When you enter this world, fresh out of college, you quickly begin to lose the useful skills you learned. There are a few classes offered to keep your skills sharp. I once attended a C++ class, taught by a non-LMCO employee. I pondered why no in-house software engineers were capable of teaching the class until a Senior Staff Software Engineer showed up, but as a student who proceeded to interrupt every 10 minutes to ask questions about basic programming concepts. At MFC, it is not uncommon to work for someone with a limited grasp of basic engineering concepts, who either has no technical degree or a degree in an unrelated field. This combination of non-technical managers and technical employees should work, except when the manager is a micromanager, which is prevalent at MFC. I once had a manager suggest that I combine an inverter with a multiplier to create a Verilog divider. Unfortunately, "suggest" meant "go do it now" and I was left contemplating how to violate the laws of physics. The employees that are promoted are not necessarily the most productive or even the most knowledgeable employees. The secret to who excels and who is allowed to languish in the same labor grade remains a mystery. There is a review process where co-workers list your strengths and weaknesses. But, the rating of the average employee seems to be predetermined and the strengths and weaknesses seem to be "massaged" to justify the predetermined rating. Some years, I personally felt that I performed poorly (more clerical than technical duties), but I received a high rating. And some years where I worked 70 hour weeks and worked two projects, I got below average ratings. It seems like a random number generator generates the ranking of the average employees, but for the coveted employees, a high rating is ensured regardless of their successes or more importantly, their failures. Some older employees are treated in a less than fair manner in an attempt to reduce the average age of the workforce by forcing the older employees to retire. It is difficult to introduce new concepts or ideas to the engineering community because the age of average worker is 50+, but the solution is not to lay them off or force them to retire. Older employees possess a wealth of useful knowledge that is never passed to the next generation. MFC attempted to correct the problem by implementing a mandatory mentorship program that has been a massive failure. I think this is largely due to the Leadership and Development (ELDP) program, which provides a fast-track for college new hires to management positions in 2 or 3 years. The prospect of a 50+ employee being micromanaged by a 25-year old with absolutely no technical experience, is a slap in the face for the older employees, and seems to lead to a rift between the two age groups, and thus a lack of participation in the mentorship program. But, the ELDP program ensures a new generation of non-technical incompetent managers will continue to micro-manage competent engineers, thus continuing the cycle or "tried and true" behavior that seems to serve this company so well. There is a pervasive culture of laziness and unprofessionalism. There are 5000+ people at MFC, but only about 20% of those employees are productive, where I define productivity as working a dismal 50% of the day. Roughly 60% of the younger employees roam the hallways distracted by their phones. And 75% of the other employees spend the day engaged in pointless non-work related conversations either on the phone or with their non-productive counterparts. In this culture, employees that actually enjoy being productive are viewed in a negative light, since they don't enjoy "sharing" with their fellow employees, where "sharing" means over-sharing every day, for hours, within full earshot of everyone in the wall to wall sea of cubes, which creates a very non-productive environment for anyone attempting to do meaningful work. Working at MFC is great if you plan to stay forever. You will get paid an above-average salary for the area and the benefits are good. But, if you plan to use MFC as a stepping stone, you will fall short. After working on trailing edge technology for years, you will be ill-equipped to pursue a career in the commercial world, and will quickly be rendered as obsolete as that MFC "tried and true" technology that had its heyday in the 1980s. The title of this review comes from a conversation with my lunch buddy, who had been passed up for promotions and decent work assignments for years until he finally opted to retire. In the months prior to his departure, he worked for a lead who was confused about whether it was resistors or capacitors that add when placed in series.

    Advice to Management

    I consider the people that work at Lockheed Martin to be your biggest asset, but many of them never feel appreciated. Take the time to give your employees positive feedback and let them work a little more independently, rather than constantly being micromanaged. It will do wonders for the morale of the average employee.


  2. Helpful (2)

    It's a job.

    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Mechanical Engineer Asc in Littleton, CO
    Current Employee - Mechanical Engineer Asc in Littleton, CO
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I have been working at Lockheed Martin full-time (More than 3 years)

    Pros

    great people to work with within the engineering levels of 1 through 5. You get 20% off on your Verizon plans.

    Cons

    Honestly, there is too much to list. I could write a book. But in short, the biggest problem with Lockheed is that it simply is just too large of a company and I feel like a commodity as opposed to a person. HR has way too much power at Lockheed. HR is not looking out for the employees like they should be. They are looking out for the company first.

    Advice to Management

    Nothing I say will change anything so giving advice to management seems pointless. Nobody seems to give a darn who you are unless you are a Director or a VP which they have too many of anyway.


There are newer employer reviews for Lockheed Martin
There are newer employer reviews for Lockheed Martin

See Most Recent

Work at Lockheed Martin? Share Your Experiences

Lockheed Martin

 
Click to Rate
or

Your response will be removed from the review – this cannot be undone.