MITRE

  www.mitre.org
  www.mitre.org
There are newer employer reviews for MITRE

7 people found this helpful  

Growth has led to decline

  • Comp & Benefits
  • Work/Life Balance
  • Senior Management
  • Career Opportunities
Current Employee - Principal Information Systems Engineer in Washington, DC
Current Employee - Principal Information Systems Engineer in Washington, DC

I have been working at MITRE

Pros

Work on tough problems technical and non technical
Develop strong relationships with key government leaders
Caring colleagues
Great benefits: vacation, retirement and tuition reimbursement

Cons

Some poor performers that float around for years
Working as consultants to government is what pays the bills
Research program is out of touch with real world
Too many subject matter experts and engineers in middle management

Advice to ManagementAdvice

Government contraction is opportunity to get rid of legacy poor performers
Invest in middle management
Make research program more relevant to our customers

Recommends
Approves of CEO

448 Other Employee Reviews for MITRE (View Most Recent)

Sort: Rating Date
  1. 10 people found this helpful  

    Growth Has Caused Many Problems

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Principal Information Systems Engineer in McLean, VA
    Current Employee - Principal Information Systems Engineer in McLean, VA

    I have been working at MITRE

    Pros

    Even with the recent changes in benefits, they are near the top in the area. You cannot beat the amount matched for the retirement plan and the flexibility of not having to invest in the company's stock since it is a not-for-profit corporation.

    I do not think you can beat the work-life balance that MITRE affords its employees.

    When we are allowed to act as a traditional Federally Funded Research and Development Center (FFRDC), the work can be very rewarding. Those of us who work in more technical areas can find satisfaction in helping the government solve problems by acting in their best interest without any issue with conflicts of interest.

    Cons

    The average age of the staff skews older. This is because the type of job we do requires experience, background, and maturity that younger workers would lack. However, this does not mean MITRE couldn't benefit from hiring younger people and bring them in to be mentored to replace retiring staff.

    The older staff, especially with MITRE's high retention record makes there very little room for advancement. Promotions are slow and when they do happen seem to go to those who have ingratiated themselves to upper management. Frankly, some people have been promoted in technical areas that couldn't engineer their way out of a wet paper bag!

    MITRE has grown a lot over the last 10 years. In order to fill its ranks, there have been a lot of hiring from the commercial consulting world whose attitudes are not aligned with that of an FFRDC. Not only has this caused tension with long time employees who could really serve the government in the FFRDC environment, but the consultants have pushed MITRE values outside of what an FFRDC should be making MITRE look like any other contractor in many areas. For example, there is nothing MITRE is doing for the Department of Homeland Security than any other contractor could do. In these cases, it makes MITRE look incompetent.

    Depending on the center that hires you, there is no career path for technical people. If you do not want to go into management of some sort, you will top out in your career. Jobs that sound like they are technical, such as Chief Engineers, are not technical but a management job for engineering functions with no chances to get your hands dirty.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    With the slow down in government growth, it is time for upper management to look at anyone hired in the last 5-6 years, even at the director levels, and assess what they are doing to advance MITRE as an FFRDC and whether they are acting as if they were still working in the contracting world. If these people are working as if they are contractors, it is time to ask them to change or find some place else to work.

    Aside from the issue with "going native" many others have written about, centers have to start to live the goal "bring MITRE to bear" and stop hiring in their own little world and start to look around for internal resources that would qualify for their positions. It is frustrating to see an announcement within CEM/CCG of a hiring that could have been filled by someone on the bench. It is time to learn to use already cultivated talent before going outside.

    Create a career path for employees who want to remain technical.

    Make the review and evaluation process more transparent.

    And when one of your technical people tells you in advance that a project is going to hit the wall, no matter how it looks, you may want to listen. Otherwise, if you do nothing and the project does fail, please be adult enough to apologize to the employee for your inability to see the forest from the trees. A little humility can go a long way!

    Approves of CEO
  2. 4 people found this helpful  

    Transformational work in support of the sponsor's mission

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in McLean, VA
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in McLean, VA

    I have been working at MITRE

    Pros

    The way the government engages MITRE is strategic in nature and with a level of access and influence not afforded to those working in the commercial contracting space. MITRE allows you to apply engineering excellence through a unique type of relationship with the government: the Federally Funded Research and Development Center (FFRDC)

    Cons

    Turnover and growth are lower than at commercial companies meaning there may appear to be fewer opportunities for advancement. The corporate culture is one of inclusion and so some employees feel that decisions can take too much time and/or result in many rounds of discussions.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    MITRE management has to work hard to find a ablance between the needs of the sponsors and our commitment to FFRDC operational excellence, and new developments in human capital management. Management should look for ways to adapt our internal organization to meet the needs of the next generation of engineers while keeping the delivery of mission-critical solutions intact. A tough job, no doubt about it...

    Recommends
    Approves of CEO
There are newer employer reviews for MITRE

Work at MITRE? Share Your Experiences

MITRE

 
Click to Rate
or

Your response will be removed from the review – this cannot be undone.