Memorial Hermann Healthcare

  www.memorialhermann.org
  www.memorialhermann.org
There are newer employer reviews for Memorial Hermann Healthcare

1 person found this helpful  

No major c/o

  • Comp & Benefits
  • Work/Life Balance
  • Senior Management
  • Career Opportunities
Former Employee - Registered Nurse in Houston, TX
Former Employee - Registered Nurse in Houston, TX

I worked at Memorial Hermann Healthcare

Pros

Vast array of specialties and departments, lots of opportunity, friendly environment, culturally diverse, knowledgable staff, good benefits, free parking, many locations

Cons

Not so easy to transfer to different department, distance from parking to building, management arrogance, lack of proper procedure protocol

Advice to ManagementAdvice

pay attention to the proper procedure protocol, dont assume that because they are an RN that they know all skills

Recommends
Approves of CEO

142 Other Employee Reviews for Memorial Hermann Healthcare (View Most Recent)

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  1. 5 people found this helpful  

    Memorial Hermann Outpatient Imaging

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Medical Imaging Technologist in Houston, TX
    Current Employee - Medical Imaging Technologist in Houston, TX

    I have been working at Memorial Hermann Healthcare

    Pros

    A professional organization with an excellent public reputation and high standards. Offers day-one benefits, multiple locations of hospitals and out patient imaging centers; wellness center, tuition reimbursement; professional growth and advanced degrees encouraged (especially for nurses).

    Cons

    This may only apply to the Outpatient Imaging Division, or possibly just the facilities acquired from River Oaks Imaging, which are understandably undergoing vast changes to conform to the Memorial Hermann model. Several years after the acquisition, employees continue to be bombarded with a never-ending stream of communication defining yet more policies and tasks to be performed in addition to patient care. Technologists are kept unduly busy with cleaning, organizing, and (especially) bureaucratic minutiae, to the point where there is inadequate time and/or personnel for procedures to consistently be performed optimally and on schedule. On site management interacts well with employees, while mainly serving as a conduit for regulatory control and correction. Management overall acts as a chain of puppets scrambling to comply with specifications governing every physical thing located on the property; patients become an afterthought. Everything looks good on paper, but in practice creates an unreasonably stressful and inefficient work environment. Nurses and techs become so bogged down in reviewing paperwork and correcting others' mistakes and dealing with interruptions from frequent updates, audits and site inspections that patient procedures are no longer able to be 1st priority. The main goal becomes to avoid doing anything out of spec, out of concern for being written up or fired.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Stop with all the emails about every little thing to everybody. Just stop. Send only what needs to be known to only those who must know it. If everyone needs to know every detail, then something is wrong. Let nurses and allied health workers do their work in peace in their area of specialty: patient care.

    Block out time on the schedule for routine cleaning and organizing to be done so it doesn't interfere with patient flow.

    Allow nurses and techs to prioritize excellent patient care by having time allotted to review procedure orders, diagnosis, and protocol a day in advance, so patients aren't kept waiting for an hour while someone tries to contact their doctor or insurance company for clarification or correction.

    Consider having Radiologists or their representitive protocol exams to ensure exam ordered is appropriate for the diagnosis and note any special instructions.

    If a patient is not allowed to leave any blank spaces on any form, then find a way to ensure compliance of the patient at the time they fill the forms out. Have the registration person or someone at that point in the process review and complete the forms before the forms are accepted to process for registration. Incomplete paperwork shouldn't be passed by 5 people before operations come to a screeching halt at the point of service.

    If a staff member is dealing with a patient or is still in procedure , don't interrupt with delivery of supplies or the latest memo or whatever. If a physician is with a patient, they should not be interrupted during that time. The same should apply for a nurse, technologist, or any staff interacting with a patient; they should not be disturbed during the procedure. Distactions lead to mistakes, and at the least, cost time. There are plenty of mandatory meetings and emails for important communications, and staff can collect supplies when notified of their arrival, or supplies can be distributed at a designated time.

    Everyone cannot do everything all the time and do it well. If all employees are busy counting grains of sand, major mistakes will be made in more important areas. Let someone good at counting sand do it, then reward them for doing something so tedious and time consuming, and for sparing their fellow workers.

    Treat nursing, technical, and office staff respectfully; they are on the front lines where money is made for the company and where the public reputation is earned.

    Keep in mind that people are not machines to be programmed. You cannot dictate every breath they take.

    Employees are also patients. Make the physical and mental work environment conducive for employees to get satisfaction from their work and everyone will win. (Snack areas near work areas so a quick break is possible, don't staff so tightly that not even one technical or office helper is available to float and provide assistance as a "gofer," help transport a patient, call a Dr's office, relay a message to a waiting patient, etc; minimize paperwork and redundancy as much as possible).

    Become more humane within the organization rather than operating as a business machine with people as cogs.. Encourage honest feedback from employees and then get someone from outside Memorial Hermann to get a fresh perspective on the company's local environments and operations, and to help make improvements.

    Doesn't Recommend
    No opinion of CEO
  2. 1 person found this helpful  

    MEMORIAL HERMANN PROS AND CONS

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - PC Technician in Houston, TX
    Current Employee - PC Technician in Houston, TX

    I have been working at Memorial Hermann Healthcare

    Pros

    I got to leave work early once all of my work was finished effectively. Plus No one was looking over my shoulders either.

    Cons

    I traveled to all memorial hermann hospitals in houston and I would get killed on gas depending on my location traveled to .

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    More communication concerning any type of detail no matter how small it is. Everyone needs to know every step of the way

    No opinion of CEO
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