National Hispanic Council on Aging

www.nhcoa.org
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There are newer employer reviews for National Hispanic Council on Aging
There are newer employer reviews for National Hispanic Council on Aging

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A joy to work with a wonderful group of people

  • Work/Life Balance
  • Career Opportunities
  • Comp & Benefits
  • Senior Management
Current Employee - Staff Associate in Washington, DC
Current Employee - Staff Associate in Washington, DC
Recommends

Pros

An amazing organization that supports and enhances the quality of life for Hispanic older adults, their families, and their communities. To visit one of NHCOA housing facilities encourages all to keep working for those less fortunate. Overall, a great professional and friendly environment to work, to learn, and to grow!

Cons

There should be more programs that would cover each of the country’s states since there are many older Hispanic adults living in remote rural areas within the country who desesperately need to improve their quality of life as they deserve.

Advice to Management

Great leadership that inspires others to work and continue working on improving the quality of life for older Hispanic adults. A great senior management that encourages and supports the rest of NHCOA team to do their job.

Other Employee Reviews for National Hispanic Council on Aging

  1. They treat employees like indentured servants

    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Public Policy Analyst in Washington, DC
    Former Employee - Public Policy Analyst in Washington, DC
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I worked at National Hispanic Council on Aging part-time (More than a year)

    Pros

    You have a chance to network and meet people that could possibly offer you a job somewhere else. The interns and employees are generally very nice and it is a diverse work environment.

    Cons

    The boss (not the CEO) won't allow employees to print anything non work related, groups multiple employees in small hotel rooms and books flights that require you to spend 8+hrs waiting for your flight, all to save 27$. Then, we she travels alone, she stays in luxury suites. She criticizes the way employees dress and accords them to her ultra-conservative standards. After a grueling and thankless time as an intern, you will have the pleasure (if your lucky) of accepting a "part-time" contracted position, which entails that you will be required to work up to 40 hours. You will often be required to illegally work more than that but don't expect a single penny, they definitely won't give it to you. Then, after you have revised something 4 times due to the boss nitpicking and failing to address what she needs, she will finally tell you after you have literally spent your whole day trying to figure out what she wants. There is a very small possibility of upward mobility and you will have to manage to work 3+ years (if you don't get fired, the turn over rate is the highest i've bared witness to in a small company).

    Advice to Management

    If funding really is so tight, stop hiring a whole bunch of new interns(paid) and allocate your budget to the young professionals that have something to offer to the company. Get rid of the boss, not a single person there that I spoke to was happy with her as a boss.


  2. Helpful (1)

    Dissapointed

    • Work/Life Balance
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in Washington, DC
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in Washington, DC
    Doesn't Recommend

    Pros

    In theory, it seems like an competent, relevant organization. It is a good starting point for young professionals who want to be involved in Latino organizations, due to the networking opportunities.

    Cons

    Most of the resources are dedicated into fundraising, and almost none to production, or creation of programs. Also, there is a very bizarre culture of power distance to upper management. President/CEO has a tendency to arrive late or not at all to meetings and interviews.


There are newer employer reviews for National Hispanic Council on Aging
There are newer employer reviews for National Hispanic Council on Aging

See Most Recent

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