New York Times

  www.nytimes.com
  www.nytimes.com
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4 people found this helpful  

Don't bother

  • Comp & Benefits
  • Senior Management
  • Culture & Values
  • Career Opportunities
Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in New York, NY
Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in New York, NY

I worked at New York Times full-time

Pros

the name. great name to align yourself with.

Cons

no job security and pay is not great. morale is low. people cry in the bathrooms. its a very sad place to be in the year 2014. what used to be a diverse corporation has now turned into a cookie cutter environment. Where's the diversity now? You won't find it.

Doesn't Recommend
Negative Outlook

156 Other Employee Reviews for New York Times (View Most Recent)

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  1. 4 people found this helpful  

    Good place to work

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Account Manager in New York, NY
    Current Employee - Account Manager in New York, NY

    I have been working at New York Times full-time (more than 3 years)

    Pros

    Reputed brand, world class journalism and one of the best sales team in the business

    Cons

    With so much churning going on lately, you have to think, act and work like a shark, be at the top of things, in business and with the constantly changing nature of the department.
    While being on top of the business is the need of the hour being constantly on the guard to protect your job erodes a lot of energy which should go into thinking creatively and strategically to grow your business and develop relationships in the marketplace

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Value the core asset of the organization, its people. Instead of replacing institutional knowledge and years of experience, invest in the existing talent, motivate them, give them tools to excel, foster faster decision making and empower the sales staff.
    There is no greater motivation for an employee than to come to work everyday feeling that they will contribute to the growth of the company that they consider as their family.

    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    No opinion of CEO
  2. 12 people found this helpful  

    Depressing, lifeless work environment

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Developer in New York, NY
    Former Employee - Developer in New York, NY

    I worked at New York Times full-time (more than an year)

    Pros

    It's the New York Times, the paper of record, one of the great icons of New York and United States culture and history and still producing amazing journalism.

    A pretty homogeneously politically liberal workplace, which is is not as easy to find in NYC as one might expect. Extremely PC. You will never hear an inappropriate joke, or any comment disrespectful to religion, race, gender, etc.

    Extremely diverse, ethnically.

    Pretty good bonus and 401k matching compared with other tech/media companies.

    Three weeks vacation + three personal days.

    Cons

    Digital side is a highly individualistic atmosphere. Engineers are expected to make a name for themselves in hackathons, and I didn't observe sincere camaraderie between others or directed at me from any but a very few people during my time there.

    There is a culture of overdesign and a love of the status quo, which means you will spend most of your time trying to maintain ridiculously complex systems.

    Product decisions seem to be based on intuition rather than a careful analysis of data, which is perplexing due to the immensity of pageview and other usage data from the various platforms that is just lying around unused. The result is 200 engineers working on few know exactly what and having who knows what impact on the success of the business. In general, data analysis and data collection are not understood and not highly prioritized there.

    The workspace itself is gray, dark, lifeless and depressing. Insist on a tour of the floor if you get an onsite interview.

    There is no process (letter of warning, bad review, etc.) for termination. One day you will simply be informed your employment is over. I observed many totally unexpected terminations of hardworking and talented individuals and no explanation of any substance was ever provided. I've spoken with other former employees and the "ambush firing" is apparently standard practice there. So if you join the Times don't ever assume anything about the security of your job.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Force engineering and product managers to make a data-driven case for any major new functionality or products.

    Get rid of the innovation challenge or require teams to be much larger. As it is, it breeds internal competitiveness and overly individualized ambition (and rarely leads to a real product anyway). 100% day has similar problems. Require large teams for entry into any of the hackathon-ish activities there. (Also, stop trying so hard to be google without even knowing why you're doing so).

    Encourage simpler architectures and maintainability in software design. DISCOURAGE OVERDESIGN and really, really audit for it. (Ask yourselves why NYT5 took so long.)

    Discourage reinventing the wheel when there is a much better wheel than one you could ever hope to develop internally already available in open source form (or in a form costing far less than the equivalent developer time). And audit for it.

    Hire a CTO who understands the tech industry has become the data industry, and that how the nytimes uses data and plans its data strategies is astronomically more important than which javascript framework is chosen.

    Have a peek at the number of barely-used aws instances generating multi-thousand-dollar bills every month. AWS (as used by nyt) is not only a ridiculously cash-wasteful hosting model, but incurs a huge developer overhead when the unwieldiness of nimbul, the role system, and the convoluted hostnaming schemes are factored in. It's a horrible system and, at the very least, someone needs to conduct a thorough analysis of its costs and impacts on productivity.

    Put some ephing supplies (and kleenex!) in the supply cabinets! Every previous and subsequent company I've worked for has provided snacks, drinks, and a bounty of other supplies and amenities. The times offices are totally barren.

    Fix the elevator algorithm.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO
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