NextEra Energy, Inc.

  www.nexteraenergy.com
  www.nexteraenergy.com
There are newer employer reviews for NextEra Energy, Inc.

 

Mostly an enjoyable experience.

  • Comp & Benefits
  • Work/Life Balance
  • Senior Management
  • Career Opportunities
Current Employee - Director in Juno Beach, FL
Current Employee - Director in Juno Beach, FL

I have been working at NextEra Energy, Inc.

Pros

Good Management and supportive environment.

Cons

Large company has some downside and tends to create an impersonal environment.

Recommends
Approves of CEO

134 Other Employee Reviews for NextEra Energy, Inc. (View Most Recent)

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  1. 5 people found this helpful  

    The company looks great from the outside but isn't healthy on the inside.

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Juno Beach, FL
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Juno Beach, FL

    I have been working at NextEra Energy, Inc.

    Pros

    As I've read in other reviews, the benefits package is pretty good and the company is stable. There are lots of training opportunities available (six sigma and technical as well). Management does a decent job of communicating higher level issues to employees. It's satisfying to work for a green energy company. Also, the company's stock price is doing great which benefits your company 401k plan.

    Cons

    Management Churn: There is constant churn in mid and upper level management. I''ve been with the company for almost ten years and i've had eight managers and my experience is not unique. This makes it difficult to establish a solid, long-term reputation with a manager or supervisor. Many empoyees joke that if you don't like your boss just wait a year and you'll have a new one. It's difficult to work in an environment where there are changes in guidance, objectives, and goals every year.

    Workload: The workload is indeed very high here and a major increase in head count is long overdue. There are long work hours and this is expected. I feel guilty leaving at 5pm and this really shouldn't be the case. It's an unsaid rule that if you are "one of the 5:00 crowd" you will have trouble getting ahead which is a very unfortunate situation because it doesn't take into account the quality of your work but instead just the number of hours you sit at your desk. I know employees that leave at 5:30 but do nothing in the last half-hour. They just don't want to leave at 5 and then be part of the "5:00 crowd". Also, better not arrive after 8:00 because that is considered late.

    Management: Many of the mangers and supervisors are unfortunately poor project managers and many projects do indeed turn into crisis or emergency projects as stated in other reviews that I've read here. There is truly a sense of 24/7 emergencies working here. I joke that every day is a new emergency. A company should never write "must have a sense of urgency" in a job description without adding a warning "... all the time". This constant sense of urgency that is expected to tend to the endless emergencies is a breeding ground for stress. In addition, because many projects are poorly managed (mostly due to unrealistic timelines) this means more meetings to discuss why the project is having problems which in turn leads to less time to work on the project which already requires more time. Not a good way to run projects.

    Organization: The company is definitely top-heavy. There are many layers of mangement and almost every little thing that you do, or want to make a decision on, requires ump-teen approvals from managment. This type of environment quickly teaches you to stop making proposals, or coming up for ideas, for new projects because it ends up taking way too much time and effort to get the approvals, funds, and resources needed which stifles out the excitement of proposing ideas or improvements.

    Promotions: Advancement opportunities are few and far between. It's very difficult to move up in this company and if you attempt a promotion of some sort it is almost guaranteed that they will find something that you are lacking (e.g. a masters degree if you "only" have a B.S.) regardless of your dedication and hard work.

    Salaries: There is salary stagnation. My advice to new hires is to negotiate a high starting salary because you cannot calculate or expect more than a 2 or 3% raise every year which by the way is pretty much just a cost of living adjustment. Also many new hires are starting with the same or higher salaries than employees that have been with the company for a long time which is not good for fostering long term careers here.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    You absolutely must address the workload issue, many of your employees are very stressed and feel like they can't do anything about it. Try to fix the issue with salaries: a new electrical engineer shouldn't have a starting salary that is higher than an engineer that has been with the company for years. Also, completely rethink project deadlines and project management within the company... many projects large and small have unrealistic time-lines and do not have enough resources (people) allocated to them.

    Doesn't Recommend
  2. 6 people found this helpful  

    Work life balance is primary concern of many employees

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Software Analyst/Developer in Juno Beach, FL
    Current Employee - Software Analyst/Developer in Juno Beach, FL

    I have been working at NextEra Energy, Inc.

    Pros

    Its a "decent" place to work. I've seen better and worse. People are friendly and do their best to make it a nice place to work. Many of the lower level bosses are great to work for. If you are in the right group you get to work with emerging technology and new things. The benefits are in line with other fortune 500 companies. If you are in the right job at the right level you get to travel to conferences and such. Peons are not afforded these opportunities. Pay is in line with other fortune 500 companies as well.

    Cons

    Work life balance is abysmal and only got worse during the economic downturn. Others have mentioned the "every other Friday program" - well, that got canceled. We were promised it would be revived by senior management. That was 1 1/2 years ago. Dress code is business casual; companies that seem to care more about their employees tend to adopt a less strict dress code. I've been to an Oracle interview and the VP was wearing a t-shirt and jeans along with everyone else. Too bad I don't want to live in California! I absolutely agree with the lack of long term planning and the "everything needs to be done right now" emergency mentality. This is what drives most of the work life balance issues. Impossible goals are set and expected to be followed - at your expense. The rush creates sloppiness which then leads to more problems tomorrow when upgrades are expected. Also, you never transfer anything to support. You create it and its your baby until you quit. So, the more productive you are, the more work you wind up with. This is not a sustainable method; I've seen product support follow a person even to other unrelated job roles when they took other roles in the company. Vacation = work from laptop. Sick = work from home. Nights = work from home. There are no good perks to working here either. Some companies provide tea/soda/snacks/coffee etc. Here you can expect water and coffee. In addition, you might be at a "satellite" office in the middle of no where. Fridge space for your lunch is at a premium in these offices (and first come first serve); I've been at 3 of them. No company vehicle (unless senior management). Here you can expect the gray wall no windows cube farm mentality in most of the offices. Career paths are non-existent for the most part unless you consider a career path "applying for another job title, getting an offer, taking that job at another location, and moving there at your own expense" a career path.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    First thing that needs to be addressed is work life balance (for real - not just presentations and talk but real action all the way to the lowest levels). Just because an employee is salaried doesn't mean said employee should be working 60+ hours/week month in and month out. Honestly, I wouldn't focus on pay; that is the one thing that seems halfway decent. The next thing I would address are working conditions. This is not the 60's, 70's, 80's or even 90's anymore. Our work spaces should reflect that. At many companies, weekend casual is ok for work and even for meeting vendors and performing interviews. Dress up is only required for meeting clients. This makes employees happy. Happy employees are productive employees. A word of warning...if things are still this bad when the economy begins to pick back up - be prepared for an exodus. Many retirement aged workers are already retiring and replacing them in some cases has been difficult. Imagine all of them retiring as the economy improves and then many others departing for other jobs at the same time. Its not a pretty picture. I really don't think it would take much to implement these changes. They are not impossible tasks.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Disapproves of CEO
There are newer employer reviews for NextEra Energy, Inc.

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