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2 people found this helpful

associate client manager

  • Comp & Benefits
  • Work/Life Balance
  • Senior Management
  • Culture & Values
  • Career Opportunities
Current Employee - Associate Client Manager in West New York, NJ
Current Employee - Associate Client Manager in West New York, NJ

I have been working at Nielsen full-time (more than 5 years)

Pros

there is the ability to move around

Cons

lack of managment, to focus on excel the choosen few and forget the rest

Advice to ManagementAdvice

managers should be people person, there is a difference between an expert and a manager

Doesn't Recommend
Neutral Outlook
No opinion of CEO
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  1. 1 person found this helpful

    Industry Leader in Innovation and Market Research

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Senior Research Analyst in Chicago, IL
    Current Employee - Senior Research Analyst in Chicago, IL

    I have been working at Nielsen full-time (more than a year)

    Pros

    - Lots of learning opportunities
    - Flexible with hours and working form home
    - no dress code

    Cons

    - politics
    - low compensation compared to other firms
    - In some divisions senior management has little to no experience with analyst work

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Focus more on valuing your employees than trying to drive 'flexability'

  2. 3 people found this helpful

    Fragmented, jack of all trades, master of none.

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Client Manager in New York, NY
    Former Employee - Client Manager in New York, NY

    I worked at Nielsen full-time (more than 8 years)

    Pros

    Salaries are ok, but nothing extraordinary. Not much stress, but not much motivation either. Nielsen has become more professional than it used to be, but there are still a few fundamental issues.

    Cons

    Nielsen offers too many products & services, and client-facing personnel are expected to learn how to sell and/or use each one of them. This results in a climate where people know enough to be dangerous, but not enough to be truly respected by our clients. I wouldn't doubt if Nielsen spins off some of them. They've been in acquisition mode for a long time, but it can't last.

    Another con is that they engaged in an outsourcing initiative a few years ago, trying to identify "low level" work that could be done by TCS personnel in India. The idea is fine, but in practice it's rather lacking. The problem is that TCS has little day-to-day interaction with stateside personnel, so a gap exists that hinders understanding of objectives & needs. This forces us to use a detailed order form to request their assistance. And when they complete their work it needs to be proofed, and often modified to be more client-presentable (due to grammar, knowledge of client issues & culture, etc). So it often takes more time than it would if you had done the whole project yourself. So now Nielsen is paying for 2 individual's time, when it could have only paid 1.

    At most other consulting firms, there is a staff of junior analysts or interns available, right here in America, and you could simply call them or walk over to their desk and say "Hey, you remember that project you did last month, could you do it exactly like that but for a different brand", and they would understand exactly what to do, without needing an order form telling them. And their output would be more client-ready due to a better understanding of English as well as domestic custom. Not to mention that these analysts would provide a steady pool of promotion-ready personnel. In contrast, the average TCS person only sticks around for 18 months, from what I've heard.

    Also, Nielsen has developed many presentation "templates" over the years, that are supposed to take data and plop it into a standardized deck. The problem is, most of those templates are very unprofessional looking. I'm talking simple things like grammar, and making sure that the margins and font sizes are the same on each page. They would never pass standards at Accenture or McKinsey or all those other consulting firms Nielsen hopes to emulate. The same goes for many of the sales and training decks. Many of them look really amateur.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Stop trying to apply General Electric organizational models on a business that lies within an entirely different industry. Promote internal people who already understand how to do things, instead of hiring external candidates just because they worked for an impressive CPG or consulting firm. And hold mid/senior managers accountable for applying leadership skills, not just managerial skills. There is a difference between a manager and a leader. Managers merely delegate work and keep track of deadlines. That's not adding much value. To be a leader, you also need to inspire your team, motivate them, and recognize them. You also should have experience doing the type of work your subordinates do, so that you could help out in a crunch.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    No opinion of CEO
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