There are newer employer reviews for Overstock.com

4 people found this helpful  

Great business opportunity, terrible personal environment.

  • Comp & Benefits
  • Work/Life Balance
  • Senior Management
  • Career Opportunities
Former Employee - Director  in  Salt Lake City, UT
Former Employee - Director in Salt Lake City, UT

I worked at Overstock.com

Pros

Great exposure to large-scale projects.
Great opportunity to move ahead.
Great opportunity to make connections in the ecommerce industry.
Great fun for those not in management, or close to management.
Excellent measurement and training internally.

Cons

Terrible senior management, excluding a couple stars.
Political and destructive relationships.
Bias toward 'yes' men/women.
Fear used to motivate.
Very little 'thanks' from VP and above. Reminds one of the birthday cake scene from Office Space--sad, really.

Advice to ManagementAdvice

Too much ego to listen to the advice around you, execs. Too blind to the destructive individuals promoted within. Unfortunate.

Disapproves of CEO

400 Other Employee Reviews for Overstock.com (View Most Recent)

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  1. 1 person found this helpful  

    Good place to work if you can handle change and working hard

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Product Content Coordinator  in  Salt Lake City, UT
    Current Employee - Product Content Coordinator in Salt Lake City, UT

    I have been working at Overstock.com

    Pros

    Excellent work life balance. I work two jobs and they worked with me to be able to keep both jobs.
    Got compensation when I earned it and voiced what I thought it was worth
    I always had work to do to keep me busy.
    Leads listened when I had suggestions.
    I've moved up to multiple positions because I told them I wanted to.

    Cons

    Some employees are worried about all the negative and don't make the place fun to work. This fight with wall street seems to be a money pit with employees not seeing what we would gain from winning any lawsuit.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Drop the suit against wall street unless we are guaranteed a victory. Be straight forward with employees on the state of the company and what you are going to do to improve the situation

    Approves of CEO
  2. 9 people found this helpful  

    Life was good in IT, but the company may be headed downhill

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Software Developer  in  Salt Lake City, UT
    Former Employee - Software Developer in Salt Lake City, UT

    I worked at Overstock.com

    Pros

    Developers get to spend a fairly large percentage of their time doing development and related tasks. Meetings are minimal if you’re in IT and not a manager. I probably averaged 1-2 meetings a week. Day-to-day life as a developer is pretty good.

    Management seems to understand that technology is a key part of the business, and IT is treated well. I experienced little pressure to meet deadlines; when something changed, we either removed some functionality or pushed the deadline back.

    Developers do not have on call responsibilities. The Network Operations Center takes care of operational issues and they are the ones who get paged. Occasionally I had to stay up until around midnight for a major deploy my team was involved in, but you can do this from home.

    IT management cares about code quality, in particular the codebase for the main website. They also care about keeping somewhat up-to-date on current technologies. Developers and testers can join once-a-week lunchtime reading groups about technology subjects that may or may not be directly related to their everyday jobs.

    Most people are smart and reasonably good at what they do.

    Nice location near the Wasatch mountains and very close to I-215.

    Work/life balance was great. I rarely had to put in any extra time, and when I did I could come in late the next day. Some departments, especially IT, have flexible schedules.

    Cons

    Upper management seems to have taken a real dive lately. Some of their decisions leave lower-level employees scratching their heads. The most recent example is the “O.co” rebranding. A majority of customers, after seeing a commercial about the new O.co name, tried to go to “o.com” instead of “o.co”. Any person at my level could have told management this would happen, if they had bothered to ask. Lack of confidence in executives has led to a general feeling of instability, culminating in the laying off of about 50 people, most in IT, just last week. The Provo development office was also closed after being open only about a year, and people who were hired expecting to work most of the time out of Provo are now stuck with a long commute.

    Financial results have been disappointing the last few quarters. As part of the financial rebalancing that happened at the beginning of the year, most of the employee perks were cut: parking shuttle, holiday party, and conference budget.

    Work areas are pretty crowded, and many people don’t have cubicles.

    Life is not very good for some development leads. Instead of being a technical leadership position, dev leads really end up spending most of their time managing people, coordinating projects, and going to meetings. For those that would like to stay technical and still spend time every day writing code, this is frustrating.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Stop worrying about whether Wall Street is illegally driving down the price of your shares, and instead focus on getting Overstock back on its feet. Pay your people what they’re worth, or they will find another company who will.

    Disapproves of CEO
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