There are newer employer reviews for Pearson
There are newer employer reviews for Pearson

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Flexible hourly job with good pay and nice people.

Former Intern - Anonymous Intern
Former Intern - Anonymous Intern

I worked at Pearson as an intern

Pros

Flexible internship and a great team.

Cons

Distribution of work was uneven throughout the year.

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  1. Helpful (7)

    The Editorial Assistant position wouldn't be so bad if the salary wasn't so low and the expectations so unreasonable.

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Editorial Assistant in Upper Saddle River, NJ
    Current Employee - Editorial Assistant in Upper Saddle River, NJ

    I have been working at Pearson full-time (More than a year)

    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    No opinion of CEO
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    Pros

    - Opportunities for a career...if you are interested in sales or don't care about significant salary advancement.
    - Generally lax and low stress work environment, depending on your position and department. Mine has not been.
    - Great benefits.

    Cons

    - The salary is pathetic - it is not competitive at all and it is not negotiable. This is frustrating, especially given the amount of responsibility that you can end up with (for example, my department started with 3 assistants. Two of them left but were never replaced so now I'm doing the work of all 3 but am actually making less than what I was making when I started due to the 2013 tax increases).

    - No real job description - when I interviewed for and received the position, there was a clear job description outlining the position and what is expected of you. However, soon after starting, that was totally thrown out the window. I have actually been told be a superior that "your job is to do whatever I tell you to do". Usually not irregular or even something worth complaining about but given the low salary, lack of opportunities for advancement and the absence of overtime, it can become extremely frustrating and make you feel like a glorified intern.

    - State of the company does not bode well for career opportunities - when I first started here, everyone made it seem like this was a career job, one that would lead to great opportunities within the company and ensure that I would be with Pearson for a very long time. But things have changed. The amount of open and available positions have decreased significantly and the CEO started talking layoffs at the latest state of the company meeting. Unless I decide to become a sales rep and move to the middle of nowhere, I'm practically stuck. Either that or I can hope for a semi-lateral move to another department that would increase my salary by a whole 2k a year. All the while, the higher ups are having meetings at the Bellagio in Las Vegas, or having corporate retreats in Bermuda. Not to mention those two assistant positions they never filled (why hire two new people when you can sucker one assistant to do the job of 3 for the price one 1?). Something doesn't add up.

    Advice to Management

    A COMPETITIVE SALARY IS A MUST! Given how expensive the cost of living is in this area and how taxing the commute can be to get up here (I currently drive 42 miles each way every day), there is no reason why the salary is barely 30k. Sadly, it seems like the company is taking advantage of the down economy, sticking to the attitude that "well, you're lucky to even HAVE a job".

  2. Helpful (8)

    Ten years of thought leadership, achievement, and tech innovation, and I'm still a manager.

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Project Manager in New York, NY
    Current Employee - Project Manager in New York, NY

    I have been working at Pearson full-time (More than 10 years)

    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    No opinion of CEO
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    Pros

    Big company, big name, looks great on your CV. Great salaries, benefits, and bonuses, especially at the corporate level.

    Before 2007, I had a great experience at Pearson. My bosses were great. They gave me autonomy because they trusted in their own decision to hire me and therefore didn't feel the need to micromanage me. I didn't disappoint them. I innovated my brains out for them. And, I was well rewarded for it. Not just rewards of "a good bonus", but with credit given where credit was due, a heartfelt thanks and appreciation for a job well done. It was great, and I felt motivated to do more and do better!

    Cons

    Company reputation is worsening, and there are no significant advancement opportunities for technical people. Advancement is only for "talkers" not "doers". There actually is a technical management pathway for career advancement at Pearson. It started in 2007. It's documented, even. But, HR pretends it doesn't exist when you ask about it. Most of upper management has no clue at all about available technical advancement pathways, so you won't either.

    If you have a complaint about upper management, as legitimate as it may be, HR will not move heaven and earth to resolve it. They'll drag their feet tremendously. If you're in an HR-mediated interview with your boss over a conflict, HR will sit silently and watch your boss walk all over you and then recommend professional development training. For you. Not for your boss. Because you are the underling, so obviously it's you that has the problem.

    Also, some upper management types like to steal your ideas and pretend they came up with them, rather than give you the reins and let you drive the bandwagon. Not good for career development.

    In 2007, the company restructured itself. People were left in the dark about what was going to happen as the Harvard-type consultants and the shiny new MBA grads swept in and had closed-door meetings with the top brass about what to do next. As a result, a lot of bad decisions were made and resources were inefficiently allocated. The culture of open-door management and respect went out the window at that point and people were shuffled around in the organizations and treated like numbers. It was like one big game of corporate Sudoku, where the math was right, but, stepping back, the whole thing looked just random and scattered.

    Advice to Management

    On the business level, focus on selling learning, not on selling metrics. Metrics can serve as evidence of learning...sometimes...but metrics are not learning. "Always Learning" is your product. Innovate on that. Don't be afraid to look toward disruptive innovation, even if it means your "bread and butter" customers are not the focus of that innovation.

    On the people management level, get back to the basics. People below you are not peons. Don't talk down to them. Don't throw chairs in conference rooms and yell at them. Don't interrupt them on conference calls and berate them because you think their ideas stink. Don't scapegoat them to save your own face when your management style was what set them up for failure. These folks are your co-workers and your colleagues first and foremost. If you don't think they're up to snuff, that's your fault for selecting them to be your employee over someone else who was up to snuff. It's also your fault for refusing to communicate their shortcomings in a timely and constructive way. It's not their fault if they can't read your mind.

    Also, The Golden Rule is not rescinded the day you get your Golden Promotion. Treat your subordinates with respect and dignity, make them part of your team, and you'll get awesome productivity and innovation from them. Steal their ideas and make believe they're yours so you can get all the glory and you'll reap passive aggressive behavior from everyone below you. Most will quit unexpectedly, leaving you high and dry.

    In short, quit being like the Pointy Haired Boss or The C.E.O. characters in Dilbert cartoon strips that your employees are passing around. Do that, and they'll stop passing those cartoons around.

    Be human. Be humble. Be approachable. Really. You're not as important as you think you are. Not in the grand scheme of it all, anyway.

    (I wish I could rate Marjorie Scardino, whom I'd give a big hug and a huge "Thumbs Up" because she was really great. I have no opinion about John Fallon, yet.)

There are newer employer reviews for Pearson
There are newer employer reviews for Pearson

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