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Overall great place to work

  • Comp & Benefits
  • Work/Life Balance
  • Senior Management
  • Career Opportunities
Former Employee - Executive Assistant  in  Plano, TX
Former Employee - Executive Assistant in Plano, TX

I worked at Perot Systems

Pros

There are great growth opportunities, great pay, and good people to work with. I started as a EA and ended as a project coordinator.

Cons

With the great pay came long hours, and the work would sometimes be stressful. There was a lot of travel involved as well.

Advice to ManagementAdvice

The leadership were very knowledgeable people who unlike other companies shared their visions to others and subordinates. They would help others achieve their goal in their career.

Recommends
Approves of CEO

180 Other Employee Reviews for Perot Systems (View Most Recent)

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  1.  

    No scope for growth. Not ready to take initiative

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Business Analyst  in  Plano, TX
    Former Employee - Business Analyst in Plano, TX

    I worked at Perot Systems

    Pros

    Good work life balance in the organization

    Cons

    No scope for growth in the career

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Take the issues by the neck. Have a vision

    No opinion of CEO
  2.  

    It's a job, not a career. Software as commodity.

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee  in  Wellesley, MA
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in Wellesley, MA

    I worked at Perot Systems

    Pros

    Perot Systems aka Dell Services, does practically all the IT for Harvard Pilgrim, whose business is very very solid. The pay check will not bounce. There is not much separation between the Harvard Pilgrim people, the Dell people, and the contractors. I was a contractor. The company is very parent friendly, and has a much larger fraction of technical women and technical members of minorities (such as Black and from India) than other places I have worked. Colleagues are very friendly and help one another.

    Cons

    The commute to Wellesley is stall-and-crawl almost every day. Most people I interacted with were contractors and the change in personnel was rapid and ongoing. It's a job, not a career. Computer software was viewed very much as a commodity. Knowledge of any particular system was not valued. Rules for health insurance are made difficult and complex for no good reason I could determine. If I were a doctor trying to comply with what insurance would support it would drive me nuts. Security was managed as an impediment. People usually were not given the access they needed to do their jobs, for many months and years. The software was archaeic. Windows XP in 2011! The machines locked up multiple times a day, possibly due to some of the disk encryption software. Lots of essential knowledge was never written down. You had to know the right person to ask, and often had to ask them more than once in different ways before they would admit to knowing what you needed to find out.. Since most people expected to be laid off, having exclusive knowledge might save a person's job, but that made it hard on anyone else who needed to know.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Upgrade to a newer version of Windows, or better yet, move entirely to Linux. Solve the problem of PCs that freeze up.

    Don't hire someone pretending you want them long term when you only want them short term. Be honest on that.

    These people who keep adding security impediments should be forced to have their cell-phone number used all night all year including week-ends and their vacations, to be the on-call person for the problems this impeding causes. When they have been woken up in the middle of the night or interrupted in the middle of a meeting or a thought for the umpteenth time, they might decide that not allowing people the access they need to do their jobs is a bad way to run things. When someone requests access and it is appropriate to give them access, you need to debug the system that gives them access, not bury them in incomprehensible questions. There needs to be a way to appeal to a more senior person when the current level appears unable to understand what access is wanted or how to provide it.

    Force the "Center of Excellence" to answer questions with a 2 week time limit. Having the answer 6 months after it is relevant is not a good use of resources and tends to lead to solutions nobody uses.

    Reward people for writing down what they know, and not by laying them off.

    Rethink employee retention. It is cheaper not to retrain a new person every 3 months. I would only recommend working for your company if someone needed a job for 6 months of less and had other plans after that.

    No opinion of CEO
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