Pew Charitable Trusts
2.7 of 5 67 reviews
www.pewtrusts.org Philadelphia, PA 500 to 999 Employees

67 Employee Reviews (View Most Recent)

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8 people found this helpful  

Chivalry is dead.

Associate (Former Employee)
Washington, DC

I worked at Pew Charitable Trusts full-time for more than 3 years

ProsPew looks great on a resume. It's easy to spin work experience at Pew into a talking points for working elsewhere, and you have access to at least a few senior managers who will back that up with a good reference. Pew is always growing and hiring, so if you are getting started out in DC it can be a place to land on your feet. But -- I mean, sweet charity, once you have that foot in the door be on the lookout for the nearest open window..!

ConsA few years back, we had just moved into the 901 E Street location, and myself and another administrative assistant were walking back from the coat closet to our desks. In those days, they were doing construction to finish the space, and we had to have special keys to get through doors to and from places. It was inconvenient, but not a big deal. But still, when the CEO sees us coming down the hallway, looks right at us, and allows the door to slam shut behind her just as we're approaching -- that hurt. "She looked right. at. us."

These sorts of interactions were not uncommon over the years. The CEO saw herself as an insulated figure. She only spoke to or engaged with those who reported to her directly, or those to whom she reported (the Board of Directors). The rest of us were mere underlings. (Did she seriously call us that? Probably not, but, she communicated it nonverbally all the time and all over the place.)

People who had spent their education and careers building expertise in environmental, health, and state policy issues and related advocacy came to Pew, an organization flush with resources and access, expecting to have the means at their disposal to carry out their life's work. But instead, they found themselves in an environment where that expertise was constantly -- and indirectly -- questioned and inexpertly picked apart by the CEO. Knowing only a fraction of any given issue area or budding partnership in an advocacy campaign she was asked to approve a contract for, she nevertheless had the gumption to fire back at her managing directors, questioning whether the staff working under them "got it".

Take it from me and several dozen other reviewers and the top universities they went to and other organizations they worked for, they did get it. If you go to work there, sooner or later, she'll do it to you. And it won't even be you she questions -- it'll be your boss or your boss's boss. Because you're not even worth holding a door for.

Advice to Senior ManagementRebecca Rimel had a good run in Pew's early days, but she needs to go. As far as I know, she has no succession plan. The tight-fisted, see-every-Pew-product-before-it-goes-out-the-door approach probably worked ok when Pew was 20 people in Philadelphia. But at 600+ now in DC, Pew needs to have someone who can inspire people by seeing themselves as but a servant in support of all that talent. Some political expertise would be helpful too (perhaps a former state governor). The culture and work environment is uninspiring and Sun Oil corporate -- I expect a leadership change and picking the right person would be Pew's silver bullet to fixing all of it.

No, I would not recommend this company to a friend

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  • Culture & Values
         
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6 people found this helpful  

Some amazing people but toxic culture

Senior Officer (Former Employee)
Philadelphia, PA

I worked at Pew Charitable Trusts full-time for more than 3 years


Pros: Good salary; benefits; vacation. Many talented and interesting colleagues, including some with excellent sense of humor. Fascinating organizational history. May sound… Cons: The list is long so it's hard to know where to start. But it probably all starts & ends with the toxic culture, which… Advice to Senior Management: Be honest about the past and get out ahead of it. Be open and provide for real interviews with Philadelphia press and others instead… No, I would not recommend this company to a friend – I'm not optimistic about the outlook for this company… More

  • Culture & Values
         
  • Work/Life Balance
         
  • Senior Management
         
  • Comp & Benefits
         
  • Career Opportunities
         
  • Disapproves of CEO

5 people found this helpful  

Pew has jumped the shark...

Anonymous Employee (Former Employee)
Philadelphia, PA

I worked at Pew Charitable Trusts full-time


Pros: Pew's benefit package is generous to most, its reputation for… Cons: Working at Pew, from an operations standpoint, is a challenging experience. Process and politics often get in the way of - and frequently dismantle -… Advice to Senior Management: Practice what you preach, and start by preaching the truth… No, I would not recommend this company to a friend More

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