Pew Charitable Trusts

  www.pewtrusts.org
  www.pewtrusts.org
There are newer employer reviews for Pew Charitable Trusts

7 people found this helpful  

First experience with poor organizational culture

  • Comp & Benefits
  • Work/Life Balance
  • Senior Management
  • Culture & Values
  • Career Opportunities
Current Employee - Finance Specialist in Washington, DC
Current Employee - Finance Specialist in Washington, DC

I have been working at Pew Charitable Trusts full-time (more than an year)

Pros

There are many positions available in one of the worst economies; excellent salaries and benefits, work-life balance, wonderful! The office building is in a great location for night life after work, or day care facilities if you have dependents. Its convenient to public transportation.

Cons

Many open positions b/c the org has very high turnover. Despite all the glamour, the ugly little secret is that everyone wants to leave the organization. Within 5-10 minutes of meeting a new person in the building there will more often than not be a snide comment about how the organization does business. Managers are not very good managers or leaders.

Advice to ManagementAdvice

Please stop wasting money. Address the turnover issue with your organization; which would undoubtedly have something to do with the fact that the organization boasts an executive office that rarely has any turnover or diversity of thought.

Doesn't Recommend
Neutral Outlook
No opinion of CEO

86 Other Employee Reviews for Pew Charitable Trusts (View Most Recent)

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  1. 8 people found this helpful  

    Employees are martyrs

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Specialist in Philadelphia, PA
    Current Employee - Specialist in Philadelphia, PA

    I have been working at Pew Charitable Trusts full-time (more than 3 years)

    Pros

    Benefits are top-notch; it a dynamic environment (never boring); coworkers are intellegent and thought-provoking; you work for a great cause.

    Cons

    Organization is management-centric: there are 2-3 managers per staff; even the workplan lists employee levels as "senior manager, deputy director, unit manager, everyone else". They will often choose an outside hire rather than promote qualified individuals from within. Management isn't open or receptive to discussions of career development or compensation. Performance reviews are backwards: regardless of your current performance, if you were a valued contributor last year, you can't be labeled as one again (so there's no means for motivation). There are too many other issues with the performance review process to list here, but it's one of the worst systems I've ever seen. There is a complete lack in trust in your professional ability, which can lead to confidence issues in perfectly capable employees.

    Pew is also going through a reorganization, where positions in their Philadelphia office are being relocated to DC. Existing employees in those positions were not offered to be moved to DC, so unneccessary layoffs occured. There should never be a financial situation where both salary expense (from hiring new, more expensive employees in a more expensive area) and severance expense increase at the same time during a reporting period, but Pew managed to do just that.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Follow Pew's mantra: TRUST the people. Instill better employee relations to keep morale high. Bring in a CEO who has more business experience than a nursing degree, so they can understand the business impact of foolish decisions before making them.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO
  2. 7 people found this helpful  

    Some amazing people but toxic culture

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Senior Officer in Philadelphia, PA
    Former Employee - Senior Officer in Philadelphia, PA

    I worked at Pew Charitable Trusts full-time (more than 3 years)

    Pros

    Good salary; benefits; vacation. Many talented and interesting colleagues, including some with excellent sense of humor. Fascinating organizational history. May sound trite but occasionally sense of doing good work to help the world. Always fun to read in the news about work you've been involved with.

    Cons

    The list is long so it's hard to know where to start. But it probably all starts & ends with the toxic culture, which itself no doubt stems from the top. The board is very insulated from conditions on the ground & board meetings are tightly orchestrated affairs to keep it that way. I watched as some extremely talented and devoted people were hired and then eliminated in short order for no good reason. And as others who had been there for years and literally given all but their lives to Pew were ushered out, also for seemingly no good reason. Absolutely zero loyalty to some very good people. This continues to happen & has destroyed morale. No consistent leadership. Philly office has been eviscerated in order to shift everything to DC. Historically speaking, there was a purge in the mid to late 1980's when the current CEO first came to power. Some board members, including Pew family members, resigned out of frustration with the direction of the organization at that time. I wonder how these early battles and relationships with the then-CEO, Thomas Langfitt, impacted the long-term leadership style of the current CEO. One Managing Director seems to have more power & leverage than all the others combined and this hurts morale as much as the constant employee turnover. The absorption & creation of Pew Environment Group caused major culture clash and did not seem well planned out. The review slamming the "sycophants and sociopaths" around the CEO is unfair in that people do what they have to in order to survive and feed their families & that's true in any organization, not only Pew. I think most people at Pew are actually very good people at core but there are some who just get warped by the culture over time.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Be honest about the past and get out ahead of it. Be open and provide for real interviews with Philadelphia press and others instead of boycotting media.
    Communications and PR can only do so much. Real world understands that it's job of Communications to spin stories & try to make Pew look effective but most people see through spin. Image is not everything; substance & honesty is.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO
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