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Great part-time college job

  • Comp & Benefits
  • Work/Life Balance
  • Senior Management
  • Career Opportunities
Former Employee - Proctor in Irvine, CA
Former Employee - Proctor in Irvine, CA

I worked at Princeton Review

Pros

Very flexible work hours, pick the jobs you want to take and don't take the ones you don't want. Reasonable- great pay, I would recommend this company even if you want to work as just a proctor.

Cons

There is a lot of prepping involved if you want to to teach a class, which could take longer than you are compensated. Management and clear instructions are sometimes lacking.

No opinion of CEO

154 Other Employee Reviews for Princeton Review (View Most Recent)

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  1.  

    Great Company

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Teacher in Los Angeles, CA
    Current Employee - Teacher in Los Angeles, CA

    I have been working at Princeton Review

    Pros

    Various "shifts" (class schedules) available; very good for people in college/grad school.
    Opportunities for cool things like overseas work.
    Staff members are friendly and funny.

    Cons

    Hard to get work over the summer.
    Amount of work available/given can be unpredictable.
    You sometimes have to drive a lot (ie class site to class site), as opposed to staying in one place like with an office job. This can be irritating in Los Angeles.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    FOR THE LOVE OF ALL THAT IS HOLY, GET RID OF E-TIME.

    Recommends
  2. 1 person found this helpful  

    Overall, it has been more rewarding than troublesome.

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Teacher/Tutor in Tempe, AZ
    Current Employee - Teacher/Tutor in Tempe, AZ

    I have been working at Princeton Review

    Pros

    1. flexible schedule -- you work no more than you want to work.
    2. good pay -- once you are hired, you make good money for teaching, $14 an hour for cross-training (learning to teach another subject), and $10 an hour for anything else you need to do, plus mileage, when you have to drive more than 30 miles round-trip. You don't need to do much, though, as once you prep your materials, you can teach or tutor out of them at a moment's notice.
    3. You can be proud of the company you're working for. What we teach works, so you don't have to feel like you're not giving your students good advice.
    4. It makes you feel smarter. You learn to think on your feet. You get a different view of teaching than you get from universities and community colleges. And, of course, you improve your own testing abilities.
    5. You can make money proctoring tests.
    6. You can get teaching work, if that's relevant to your career field, rather than having to wait tables or something, so you won't have gaps on your resume.
    7. You can often get into the classroom very quickly once you're hired and start getting that paycheck.

    Cons

    1. You might get less work than you want, especially in the summer.
    2. It is intensive and unremunerative up-front. You have to do a lot of prep to get through your first training, and that time is unpaid.
    3. Every time a new version of a book comes out, you have to prep it again (although you are paid for your time, up to a predesignated point).
    4. To advance to a Master or Premier tutor, you have to bring in your own business. You have to be a salesman.
    5. Raises are largely based on student evaluations, and even then are pretty small.
    6. No benefits unless you're full-time, which most teachers aren't.
    7. High turnover.
    8. You are often helping rich kids get higher scores, when they're not necessarily the ones who most need or deserve help.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Give local sites more say over what kind of raises to give. Offer "hero" bonuses for taking classes, events, or students that no one else wants, or students that are unhappy or likely to be. Offer bonuses for being available for everything. Offer partial benefits for part-time workers.

    Recommends
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