There are newer employer reviews for PwC
There are newer employer reviews for PwC

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Helpful (3)

Terrible place to work

  • Work/Life Balance
  • Culture & Values
  • Career Opportunities
  • Comp & Benefits
  • Senior Management
Current Employee - Senior Associate in San Jose, CA
Current Employee - Senior Associate in San Jose, CA
Doesn't Recommend
Neutral Outlook
Disapproves of CEO

I have been working at PwC full-time (More than a year)

Pros

Exposure to a lot of work, industries, ambitious people

Cons

NO work-life balance, cut throat environment.

Other Employee Reviews for PwC

  1. Helpful (5)

    Good for some, not for others

    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Executive Assistant in New York, NY
    Current Employee - Executive Assistant in New York, NY
    Positive Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I have been working at PwC full-time (More than 10 years)

    Pros

    --Excellent benefits include medical-dental-eyewear, a transportation account, small employer contribution to a separate retirement fund, voluntary 401K, 22 vacation days and 2 personal days per year, etc. Staff is generally intelligent and hard-working, although most are not well-rounded and display a narrow focus of interests outside of the job and their family. --For newly-minted college grads with a financial background, it is good for the resume, and most leave for better jobs.

    Cons

    --Virtually none of the Staff, most with Accounting/Finance majors and backgrounds, understand the Firm's stupifyingly confusing and non-intuitive finance systems. They are not trained in it and leave most of the background financial work to be done by the Executive Assistants - none are CPAs and most do not have a college degree. Even most of the Staff who actually use the systems do not understand them; mistakes are rampant. --The Help Desk for general assistance has been outsourced to India; the Financial Help Desk has been outsourced to Uruguay. People in those groups are not members of the Firm, yet have access to our confidential and financial information and systems. --The Assistants are basically slaves, and they let you know it. The raises are poor, never even covering cost of living increases. Lying, competition, favoritism and back-stabbing at the Assistant level is a way of life. Morale has been in the basement for years owing to the lack of inclusion, but by now it is in the sub-basement.

    Advice to Management

    --Train Staff in the background finance systems, with the expectation that they need to understand it and will be required to use it. In an accounting firm, it makes no sense that the essential financial arrangements are made by the financially untrained or financially illiterate. --Re-organize the Assistant level so it is no longer a separate unit; re-include the Assistants in the groups for which they actually work, so they can once again feel and be a real part of the Firm. ---Eliminate the lower Administrative level of "Team Assistant", and make everyone again an Executive Assistant; most can do it. --Recognize that the "statistics" gathered for the TAs are lies forced upon people by the need to pretend to meet unrealistic quotas. They are part of a pool and are not directly responsible to anayone, unlike the now-overburdemed Executive Assistants. --All the TA level accomplishes is that the EA/TA Managers can keep their jobs through the extensive collection and slicing and dicing of meaningless data. --For this the Firm paid untold millions to McKinsey, yet after years of study, the best they could come up with was to fire Assistants, lower Assistant salaries, and lower most the level of most Assistants. Now we have too few Assistants, with the majority not truly answerable to anyone. --Consider whether the short-term savings achieved by outsourcing the Firm's most critical back-end systems will harm the Firm even more than it has done already. Take a long-term view - in the long run it's not just what you save, but what you do.


  2. Helpful (1)

    Company is good, but opportunities outside the standard accounting track are limited

    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Business Analyst in Boston, MA
    Current Employee - Business Analyst in Boston, MA
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at PwC full-time (More than 3 years)

    Pros

    1) Generous vacation package (start at 3 weeks, get 4 weeks after 2 years). If you're hired as a manager you get 4 weeks right away I believe. 2) At least in my department (which existed outside the normal assurance engagement team model), work hours were flexible and you could work remotely. 3) Work is fairly autonomous - there's not a lot of micromanaging so you basically structure your day how you best are able to tackle the task at hand. 4) If your goal is partner in an accounting firm, working in another smaller accounting shop, or doing consulting, then PwC is probably one of the best companies you can go to, because you are very marketable when looking for new jobs, and the culture they embody trains you quite well in those disciplines.

    Cons

    1) Busy season and overtime in general. For two or three months out of the year you will be working at 60-80, if not more, hours per week. This goes for most lines of business, although my experience is only in Assurance (auditing). Overtime throughout the year to some degree is expected. This is fairly standard for a Big4, but nonetheless it can significantly disrupt your life, especially if you have kids. 2) Constantly connected. This is the dark side of flexibility. With a laptop and a blackberry and the expectation of overtime much of the year, it becomes very hard to separate yourself from the seemingly endless stream of tasks in what seems like an ever-shrinking amount of time. 3) For those who are not accountants and who work in what might be considered "supporting" tasks, like programmers/developers, IT, business analysts, project managers, etc, there is no clear advancement structure in PwC because these roles are non-standard. The best bet you have is to get your experience and then go find another job somewhere else.

    Advice to Management

    This will probably never happen given that it's practically industry standard, but some consideration on working hours would be great help in advancing towards a true work/life balance. Also, for those roles which fall outside of the standard rank and file, provide more clear paths for advancement.


There are newer employer reviews for PwC
There are newer employer reviews for PwC

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