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4 people found this helpful  

Stay away from Raytheon Tucson. These people are liars with no respect for their workers.

  • Comp & Benefits
  • Work/Life Balance
  • Senior Management
  • Culture & Values
  • Career Opportunities
Former Employee - Senior Software Engineer in Tucson, AZ
Former Employee - Senior Software Engineer in Tucson, AZ

I worked at Raytheon as a contractor (less than an year)

Pros

None, except it's in Tucson.

Cons

Where do I start. The management is a buch of shiftless spineless liars.

Advice to ManagementAdvice

Get a real job.

Doesn't Recommend
Negative Outlook
No opinion of CEO

1496 Other Employee Reviews for Raytheon (View Most Recent)

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  1.  

    Terrific

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Senior Technical Support Engineer in Fullerton, CA
    Former Employee - Senior Technical Support Engineer in Fullerton, CA

    I worked at Raytheon full-time (more than 5 years)

    Pros

    Great pay and benefits, great staff of personnel to work with and they strive for excellence. Travel and experience unparalleled.

    Cons

    Though this is a great job with terrific benefits, there is always the cloud hanging over your head about losing your job. Much of the work is contract based so you always have job insecurity looming.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    No advice for the management, some are absolutely great and some you wonder how they got and kept their jobs.

    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    Approves of CEO
  2. 5 people found this helpful  

    Good. Slow and steady wins the race.

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I have been working at Raytheon

    Pros

    Raytheon is the typical big company. Lots of bureaucracy. You'll know whether you're on the fast track within 3 or 4 years. But as an engineer it offers interesting work and being a big company there is opportunity to move around. As an engineer, if I get interesting work that engrosses me and makes the day fly by, and I get paid a decent salary, I can't complain.

    Benefits are good although they have been changing the medical insurance options which seem to be getting more expensive and cover less. This is probably happening at many companies. Flexible work schedule. The extent of the flexibility varies depending upon your manager and your work in particular. In my experience it is easy to flex a handful of hours here and there, and no one bothers you if you make them up within a 2 week window. Also they allow the option of a "9/80 work schedule" which means you work 9 hour days and get every other friday off. After 5 years you get 4 weeks of vacation/sicktime (all one bucket). After 15 years you get 5 weeks which is the max. Some people are grandfathered in with more time off, but they are the older folks. They offered a pension up until about 2005. I know it's not useful for new employees but I figured I'd mention it (the pension is calculated as 1.8%/year for the first 20 years and then 1.2%/year every year thereafter. That final percentage of your salary when you retire is the benefit). For 401k, they match up to 4% of your salary.

    Cons

    Hard to get promotions. In engineering they have 6 levels, and then two engineering fellow salary grades. So I will admit there aren't a ton of rungs here. However, even if you perform well, they are very stingy with the promotions. They only like to see certain %(low) of people move up in a given timeframe. The first 3 or 4 grades will go fast. Then it slows down. There are also management tracks which become less technical the higher up you go. More like managing people and department resources. Then there are tracks for Program management. In my experience, the frustrating thing to see on your review is that you're "promotable" and then not actually get the promotion. The designation seems to hold little meaning. They are also a fan of carrot dangling. The "do this additional thing" or "wait til next cycle" is a common response. I'm not a huge fan of the review process in general. There is a large disconnect between the people who decide the rankings / raises / promotions and the project management. Also the performance review timeline is crazy. You tell line management who your technical leads have been and divide up the time you spent working on the tasks with those leads. Usually you report this in November. Typically this is 2-4 people. Then the line management asks those people for a review of your work. Typically a paragraph or so. Then the requesting folks who haven't spent more than 10 hours with you all year are sitting in a room ranking the people in that dept within each level (ranked against your peers). These rankings determine raises and promotions. If you are top 10% you will probably get 1-3% over someone in the middle and you may get a promotion. In my experience the typical raise is 3-4% and a promotion is typically worth another 3-4%. To get back to the time line, I have been told the ranking are determined by the end of the year. Sometimes before a required final self assessment and report on your year. They ask for this but it appears it is more for documentation and has little, if any influence on rankings b/c they have already been done. Then sometime in January the raise budget is decided per department and the dept manager and the 5 or 6 section managers below him must divide up the budget guided by the rankings. Then in April you get your previous year performance review from your section manager with a summary which is often recycled stuff you or your technical manager wrote. It'll say M = meets expectations, E = exceeds expectations or FE = far exceeds expectations. It may also have a designation P for promotable. Here is the stupifying thing. At that moment you can have a great review with tons of positive feedback. Then about 3 weeks later at the beginning of May you get a raise notice (effective the first paycheck in May) which tells you the bottom line % increase all this BS has been leading up to. At this point it's too late to do anything. Management is very inflexible on disputes and making any "corrections". Then about a month later you have your mid year review for the current year and the horrible cycle continues. Why must this be so drawn out? And why do people who have no clue what is being done on a daily basis wield so much power over something as important as this? By the time you actually get feedback on the previous year, we are a solid 4 months into the new year. That is so dumb. I have no idea why the review cycle must be so extended. Plus if you want to dispute something, or make a case for yourself, time has passed, no one remembers details, and management claims there is nothing they can do. It's typically a "wait 'til next year" scenario. Not good. I'll tell you this. If it weren't for the pension, I'd leave. But as the title says, slow and steady wins the race.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Scrap the review process. Scrap line management in general. The disconnect between line management and the people who actually do the work is staggering. Also it'd be nice to see the director now and then rather than at some 1 hour town meeting every year. I have no clue what those folks do all day "leading" the company. They forgot what the company was built on. It's an engineering company. Give it back to the engineers. Dennis Picard was a good man. Wish he was still running the show.

    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO
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