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3 people found this helpful  

No potential for promotion

  • Comp & Benefits
  • Work/Life Balance
  • Senior Management
  • Career Opportunities
Current Employee - Support Specialist  in  Dayton, OH
Current Employee - Support Specialist in Dayton, OH

I have been working at Reynolds and Reynolds

Pros

Entry level
Resume building.
Loads of downtime.
Friendly coworkers.
Decent pay for just being out of college with less than an associates degree.

Cons

No potential for promotion, even though the idea of promotion is fed to you from the interview.
Cannot move out of your department for at least 2 years, and even then, you can only move within the department (tier 2, supervisor, etc)
No pay increase for either of those positions, by the way.

Disapproves of CEO

Other Reviews for Reynolds and Reynolds

  1. 17 people found this helpful  

    Okay for a first job out of college, but I couldn't wait to escape that place

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Customer Training Professional  in  Houston, TX
    Former Employee - Customer Training Professional in Houston, TX

    I worked at Reynolds and Reynolds

    Pros

    Benefits package - 401(k) is very highly competitive.
    The other people (at entry level positions) are fantastic to work with, I made great friends there who I will probably have for the rest of my life.
    They definitely give opportunities to recent college grads to get a foot in the workforce, they took a chance on us when no one else in this economic climate would.

    Cons

    The company cannot keep hold of its employees, people are leaving every couple of days. In my last 6 months there, 22 people left the company from my department alone. As a result, the rest of us got extra work assigned to us and it made the work-life balance absolutely intolerable. During the interview process, they said that we should expect to spend between 50-70% of the time on the road (flying or driving to customer sites). It turned out to be more like 90-95%. In my last 20 weeks there, I was away for 18 of them, and one of those weeks that I was in the office was only because a trip of mine had been canceled at the last minute.

    The high turnover was caused primarily by the low pay, particularly when compared to the amount of work we had to do, the lack of any sort of work-life balance, and the treatment we received from our customers. The amount of pay you earned was based on the frequency of your work trips. Every time you went away for a work trip, you would get a per diem to cover your hotel and food expenses for that week. Then you could keep the rest. The trouble is that this was usually the only way to make a competitive salary and keep up with the bills. As a result, most of us were away from home so much we actually felt like our own houses were our hotels and hotel rooms were our apartments.

    Training was completely unorganized. With so many programs to learn, it was extremely difficult covering all the topics you needed to, especially when some classes for certain pieces of software only came around once every 3 months. Sometimes you'd get sent out to do an implementation for a piece of software having never had the chance to learn it beforehand, meaning that quite often we had to "guess" our way through some of the questions we received.

    On several occasions I went to see my supervisors and managers (either alone or with several other people) to voice my/our opinions about certain issues. On several occasions, we were told that they would look into it, but then nothing would ever get done about it.

    On several occasions we were instructed to "bend the truth" in front of our customers, particularly about our age, years of experience with the company, and functionality of the software we provided. Lying to customers is not a good practice and led to widespread employee dissatisfaction.

    New employees don't get a single day off for the remainder of the calendar year in which they started. One good friend of mine at the company started on the first workday of 2012 and as a result, must go through the entirety of 2012 without a single paid vacation day.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Pay your employees more money. If they made more money to begin with, half the people would not have left the company and left the ones remaining with more work than they can handle, which further encourages them to leave. Work-life balance is neglected. We work especially hard for you and yet you actively argue with us every pay period about how much money we're owed. Don't make us fib in front of customers, and if you don't want customers to know that you're sending out 22-year-olds to do the implementation and training, then don't hire us.

    I went to numerous customer sites who reported that Reynolds & Reynolds before UCS acquired it was a fantastic company to work with (and for), but that since Bob Brockman has come in, the culture within the company has changed dramatically. There is a reason why Bob Brockman only has an 18% approval rating on this site, and why the company as a whole only has a 21% satisfaction rating. It's because this company is in deep trouble. If you're desperate for a job, then take it, but take everything they tell you during the interview process with a large pinch of salt. The "hiring spree" they told me they were in the middle of last year when I joined wasn't because they had done well financially (they had, but that's irrelevant), it's because during the Spring of 2011, half of the department I worked for left. Most people only stay there for a few months, or a year tops. I stayed there 9 months. This surely isn't a sustainable method of operations.

    Pay your employees more, and listen to their opinions a lot better, and you will keep a lot more good, honest, hard-working people on board.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Disapproves of CEO
  2. 8 people found this helpful  

    Not Worth It

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee  in  Houston, TX
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in Houston, TX

    I worked at Reynolds and Reynolds

    Pros

    It is a good place to just "get a job" and gain some corporate experience right after college while you figure out what you want to do.

    Cons

    -No room for advancement
    -Salaries are very low
    -Micro-managing supervisors
    -No vacation time your first year of employment. If you start in January of 2012 you will not receive any vacation until January of 2013.
    -Employee morale is awful
    -They base hiring mostly on scores from pre-employment aptitude testing. They will schedule you to come take a test and say "you may have an interview when your finished." Once you're done, they check your scores and if you passed you will get an interview. If you didn't do so hot, they will send you home and say "you will hear from us in 3-5 business days."

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Develop career paths for employees. Raise salary levels to be competitive and not have so much employee turnover.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Disapproves of CEO
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