There are newer employer reviews for Robbins-Gioia

 

Experience may vary

  • Comp & Benefits
  • Work/Life Balance
  • Senior Management
  • Career Opportunities
Current Employee - Senior Analyst  in  Washington, DC
Current Employee - Senior Analyst in Washington, DC

I have been working at Robbins-Gioia

Pros

RG is a very family oriented company to work for. They are very understanding when it comes to family issues and many couples choose to work at RG.

Cons

The on-boarding process needs help. Two times i have started working for RG and both times I found myself arriving at the clients site with no direction. Probably the biggest disappointment is the disconnection between the consultants and HQ. It is very apparent to me that HQ should not be bothered with the on-site consultants becuase they are too busy. HQ seems to forget all too frequently that the only reason why they receive a paycheck is becuase of RG's revenue stream-- the consultants. RG also has a career matrix in place to determine pay levels and job categories. Although the system means well, it is not a good practice. I was told that I have to wait to have 5 years of experience before being promoted-- even though I was doing all and more work than a Consultant level. RG is too stuck on seniority becuase of years in service rather than talent and performance. During hard economic times, RG still finds a way to throw extravagant parties for senior management while only giving tiny pay increases to the hard working employees who earn the company profit. RG also has many box seats for sporting events and various activities around the Washington, DC area. I have never seen any offerings come across my inbox or phone to these events. These things are typically only heard about at HQ (once again, the people who work hard, long hours are given nothing for their contributions) where HQ employees seem to think that they are above the on-site employees (when again, who makes RG money?).

My comments are nothing new-- it is more of a mere common theme among on-site consultants.

Advice to ManagementAdvice

Develop your young talent becuase we are actively looking for other employers who treat their revenue stream (their consultants) with more respect and treat them fairly. If an employee is working above the job matrix they are currently in-- promote them! It probably costs the company more money looking for someone to replace them than giving them a little more in a salary.

No opinion of CEO

54 Other Employee Reviews for Robbins-Gioia (View Most Recent)

Sort: Rating Date
  1. 1 person found this helpful  

    Good place to begin career, but lacks growth opportunities for young, mid-level professionals.

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee  in  Washington, DC
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Washington, DC

    I have been working at Robbins-Gioia

    Pros

    - Detailed internal planning of a PM career path based on PMI methodologies.
    - Partnership with ESI allows more training opportunities for staff.
    - Internal trainings and "brown bags" are helpful.
    - Promote and support their workforce to obtain certifications like the PMP and to join professional organizations like PMI.
    - Retail discount program.

    Cons

    - Little to no communication of HQ activities with client sites, other than generic monthly newsletters.
    - Employees working at the HQ office aren't responsive to employees at client sites for basic needs, even though client site employees generate income to help pay salaries of HQ employees.
    - Client sites are mismanaged and personnel feel like they are used for staff augmentation, not for their consulting services.
    - Employees are dumped at client sites without any knowledge of engagement or strategic goals. They are sent to sites without orientation (either to the company or to the site) and often don't know who their client is or how they can provide true consultative services. They are usually thrown into the "fire du jour", which sets the expectation for that person to be reactive instead of proactive.
    - Client engagement management is weak at best. Roles and responsibilities of each member, along with the team as a whole, is not communicated clearly up front with clients. This in turn leads to members being assigned to various roles in short time spans and loss of morale and efficiencies. The client is able to distort what could be a valuable member (or team) into a reactive and stressed employee (or team).
    - Mid-level professionals feel they have no growth opportunities. Internal opportunities are either too junior (and would require a pay cut) or are too senior for current skill-set. It is a very dichotomous workforce - either one is an analyst or a senior consultant and the bridge in between is proving too vast for senior analysts to stick around.
    - Communication of major events - personnel leaving or arriving at either HQ or sites - is not communicated. People have spent weeks trying to contact someone who is no longer with the company, and people at engagements aren't aware their coworker has left to join another company.
    - PM is heavily stressed in the RG corporate culture. They are far behind the curve in other areas like Contract Management, Human Capital Resource Management and Financial Management. Similar career tracks like what has been established with PM should be created and allow people to follow those tracks in lieu of the PM track that is heavily promoted.
    - RG seems too conservative (or slow) to capitalize on the new administration's spending in other areas. They seem to be clinging to DHS - a sinking ship, financially-speaking - when they should be focusing on HHS (Healthcare received the bulk of stimulus funds), Labor, Education, Energy or other areas that are receiving heavy stimulus funding and political attention.
    - Internal certifications are not executed well. If employees are deemed to be at a certain career level, they are dinged if they do not have these internal certifications, even though they may not get the chance to gain the experience needed for the certification at their particular client engagement.
    - Ageism is the glass ceiling at RG, not gender or any other descriptor. Young professionals are slotted in administratively-skewed positions (despite their skill sets or experience) where growth is impossible and their ideas and perspectives are not viewed as fresh or innovative - they are ignored.
    - Hard work is rewarded with a $10 gift card, which is sometimes viewed as a slap in the face. If one works on a project for a month and is rewarded with $10, how does RG think that person will react to the insinuation of their hourly worth?

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Your employees and your reputation are your lifeline - don't forget about the employees on client sites who are generating income and representing your name and future.

    Doesn't Recommend
    No opinion of CEO
  2.  

    Great place to work, if you can come in as someone who's been with RG for 10 years.

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Senior Consulting Manager
    Current Employee - Senior Consulting Manager

    I have been working at Robbins-Gioia

    Pros

    With the right manager, you can get support for educational or continuing educational courses. Review and goal setting are company wide using software system to level the field.

    Cons

    No one really cares about people that aren't in the inner clique, especially if you're out on a contract. HQ people forget that their customers are the people out on contract.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Have everyone in HQ spend 3 months on contract supporting a client, even if there is no charge to the client.

    Disapproves of CEO
There are newer employer reviews for Robbins-Gioia

Worked for Robbins-Gioia? Contribute to the Community!

Your response will be removed from the review – this cannot be undone.