Ryan, LLC
4.2 of 5 186 reviews
www.ryan.com Dallas, TX 1000 to 5000 Employees

186 Employee Reviews (View Most Recent)

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Must have an advocate to get anywhere. Company culture eroding.

Anonymous Employee (Current Employee)

I have been working at Ryan, LLC full-time for more than 3 years

ProsSenior leadership is fine. Company growth presents ample opportunity for career growth if you have someone to advocate for you. Atmosphere is friendly and generally helpful. Great place to enter from another company. Company is awesome to work for if you only stay 2-3 years. Workplace flexibility is unmatched.

ConsMiddle management is based entirely on revenue with no thought to leadership or management ability. Hence, if they bring clients with them when they come, are able to sell effectively, or get fed by a Principal, they will generally be considered successful even if they are extremely poor at actually managing. If you don't have an advocate (i.e. a manager or Principal who is interested in seeing you progress), nothing you do will make a difference. Managers / Principals are generally too busy pursuing sales leads to take an interest in your career, which obviously compounds the previous problem.

The poorer managers are also perfectly willing to accept mediocrity: poor performers are accepted, nurtured, and praised when they do well while star performers are expected to be stars and pick up the slack. This is a relatively new phenomenon (within the past 2 years) and is why I say the culture is eroding. When I started, mediocrity was not tolerated.

The firm does not care about education beyond the required accounting hours that they want you to have as a Consultant; an MBA is useless here due to the aforementioned reason.

Unless you come in as a manager or have an advocate you will never make manager (Team Leader) here. Having an advocate is the key to success here.

With a few notable exceptions, the Principal group is wholly consumed with itself.

Advice to Senior ManagementKeep the good managers, fire the rest. You should know who they are, most of the employees probably do. If you want more sales, hire more BD's. Your managers should be there to manage. Your revenue would increase if engagements and employees were managed and motivated appropriately.

On that note, some of the things you seem to think motivate us actually don't. When you sign an engagement that in no way affects my team, I don't care. Principals and the relevant engagement teams benefit from those engagements, not me. I don't need the informative email. The amount of interest I have in that engagement and the amount of interest you have in my personal stock portfolio gaining 3% is roughly equal.

If you want to motivate your employees, find out what they want as individuals and then give it to them. I can tell you right now what would motivate each member of my team and about half the members of other teams in my office; I feel quite confident that their managers couldn't and don't care anyway.

Finally, you rest your laurels on myRyan and workplace flexibility. It's great, don't misunderstand; it's just not the only thing most employees are concerned with. You seem to have the attitude that since we have myRyan your job is complete and no one will even dream of leaving, which is clearly not the case. By all means keep it and be proud of it, but don't think it gets you off the hook for motivating your employees. Employee motivation is a job for the managers who have (or should have) one-on-one professional working relationships with their employees. Give your managers training on how to motivate their employees and measure them on their success. Rather than using their teambuilding budget for dinners and cirque shows, encourage them to use it on Myers-Briggs or Strengths Finder. Or better yet, let them do the cirque shows and you pay for their Strengths Finder.

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  • Culture & Values
         
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2 people found this helpful  

Great Workplace Flexability

Senior Consultant, Sales and Use Tax (Current Employee)
Dallas, TX

I have been working at Ryan, LLC full-time for more than 5 years


Pros: First off, I would like to say that I don't love my job. Taxes can be mundane and boring, but I love working at… Cons: Not all managers are created equally. There is little oversight on how managers implement myRyan or the… Advice to Senior Management: I have friends on other teams that can't utilize myRyan at all because of their manager. So, I would provide a survey to… Yes, I would recommend this company to a friend – I'm optimistic about the outlook for this company… More

  • Culture & Values
         
  • Work/Life Balance
         
  • Senior Management
         
  • Comp & Benefits
         
  • Career Opportunities
         
  • Disapproves of CEO

2 people found this helpful  

Poor Benefits, self serving, good flexibility

Consultant (Current Employee)
Los Angeles, CA

I have been working at Ryan, LLC full-time for more than 3 years


Pros: Flexible work schedule, thats about it... Cons: 401k horrible, insurance expensive, ability for advancement lacking Advice to Senior Management: Stop being so self indulgent and try to think about… No, I would not recommend this company to a friend – I'm not optimistic about the outlook for this company… More

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