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Great experience and personal growth; but, turbulent times are here for now.

  • Comp & Benefits
  • Work/Life Balance
  • Senior Management
  • Culture & Values
  • Career Opportunities
Former Employee - Project Manager  in  Washington, DC
Former Employee - Project Manager in Washington, DC

I worked at SAIC full-time for more than 3 years

Pros

The opportunities, particularly if you have skillsets that align to SAIC's core lines of business appear to remain strong. There are lots of jobs being posted even in the tough economy. However, you may find the number dwindles significantly if you do not possess a high security clearance. If you happen to have certain high demand skillsets you will find some positions as well. Generally, like many other big companies, you will have far more flexibility and options in the earlier years of your career (at lower income ranges). Mobility at the higher levels gets a bit cramped quickly and it becomes somewhat difficult to find coverage (consultant speak for "billable") if your specialty is somewhat unique; or, your security clearance isn't high enough. The people here are terrific; my leadership and management was first rate. Frankly, as a senior staff hire, I learned more and experienced significantly more than any job in the prior 10 years. TIP: If possible, for best job security (at SAIC or after leaving), pursue the jobs that require and will help you obtain the highest security clearance possible! To folks that have the option, even if it means a little longer commute, or suffering through a job for 12 months, it will definitely pay-off. With a clearance, you will have many more options and be put into a position with much better control over your career. Universally true to the federal consulting companies (not just SAIC). This is obvious to those of you in the industry - not necessarily so - for somebody new to the federal consulting world!

Cons

[I am not bitter over departing. To the contrary, I harbor no ill will; and as shown, I would return AND recommend the company to a friend - under the right circumstances/opportunity. However, these are tough times for the company internally.] The company has been in search of a true identity for years. The primary lines of business shifted at least twice in the past four years. The company was founded on the principles of developing niche businesses within the company. Since taking the company public (coincidentally?) they have scrambled to find an identity. I would suggest that the scrutiny of the mutual fund stockholders has left the leadership scrambling to develop an "elevator pitch". Analysts likely find it difficult to get their heads around all of the fragmented businesses that the company was actually built and thrived upon. Why focus on the macro view? Honestly, this has been causing some significant strain at the higher corporate ranks (re-org's of the day); and, now has begun to filter down to the staff. The recently announced splitting of the company into two entities took the lingering sense of "what's next?" to, "How is this going to affect me?". The latter is far more personal and distracting to your daily work. Layoffs recently escalated; some undoubtedly tied to our government's fiscal chaos, but most is likely driven by "getting leaner" (like the split, this move is probably more intended to appease Wall Street - than please Main Street.). I am pulling for the company, and it's great employees, that this all works out and the company emerges stronger from the pain it is currently enduring and likely will for another year or two. I don't know how many hiring managers could look a current candidate in the eye and tell them they will be fine if they join right now. How would they know? Most couldn't honestly tell you where they will be in 6-12 months. If this is your best offer and, you go in understanding the current turmoil and have the ability to stay focused above the pain taking place around you - go for it! I would absolutely go back - for the perfect job - but, nothing less (including a long and solid contract).

Advice to ManagementAdvice

You took this company public (or, knowingly walked in after the fact) and no longer have the latitude and patience afforded to you by employee ownership. It would appear that we were ill prepared for Wall Street’s glaring lights after the initial public offering sweetheart deals expired. Your current courses of action are boilerplate reactions to a stock price in steady, nearly uninterrupted decline. You started by simplifying the message (ads) so even the street's analysts could understand it, cut people to reduce costs in order to chase the ever elusive "steady consistent profit growth" model the biggest fund investors demand. Now you have resorted to the "split-up to unlock hidden value" tactic. The next move is quite predictable. I am curious how long you intend to perpetuate the message of "we're doing it for greater flexibility in pursuing new business"? Seriously? Does anybody believe that the intent is anything more than using the "one time" reorganizational income statement charge-off and resulting "bought time" - to package up and allocate the resources for sale (we don't want to call resources what they are in this business – people; that would just be too insensitive). Ironically, besides taking a huge gamble on the remaining SAIC company remaining competitively viable and selling out the other folks (literally) - the wolves will continue to circle. Wall Street historically rewards leaders with strong convictions, clear vision and prudent decision making. They eat companies for lunch when they are in a tailspin (death spin?). The board seems to be listening more to the sharks in "mergers and acquisitions" than seeking the counsel of visionary corporate leaders who know how to actually build strong viable enterprises. Employees rise up and buy your company back! Shoot, it's lost 33% of its value since the day it went public. Quite a bargain indeed. I admit to being too lazy to check; but, I suspect there is (or will be) allowance for bonuses in the executive’s compensation packages should a sale happen to take place.

Recommends
Negative Outlook
Disapproves of CEO

1115 Other Employee Reviews for SAIC (View Most Recent)

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  1.  

    IT Engineer

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - IT Engineer  in  Oak Ridge, TN
    Former Employee - IT Engineer in Oak Ridge, TN

    I worked at SAIC full-time for more than 3 years

    Pros

    Somewhat of a stable environment

    Cons

    Not much advancement is available

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Look at people who are worthy to move up and move them up or they will leave.

    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO
  2.  

    Subcontracts Manager

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Subcontracts Manager  in  Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD
    Former Employee - Subcontracts Manager in Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD

    I worked at SAIC full-time for more than 3 years

    Pros

    Some really talented peers, decent benefits.

    Cons

    Lack of communication amongst programs. Does not adequately fund training or encourage advancement.

    Recommends
    Negative Outlook
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