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Helpful (3)

In the middle.

  • Work/Life Balance
  • Career Opportunities
  • Comp & Benefits
  • Senior Management
Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
Former Employee - Anonymous Employee

I worked at SHRM

Doesn't Recommend
No opinion of CEO
Doesn't Recommend
No opinion of CEO

Pros

The Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) is a great place to learn a lot about a lot of different things. They have divisions ranging from customer service to events to publishing.

Cons

In some divisions or departments, there is virtually no worklife balance. It all starts at the top. At the time I worked there, the top person had no life.

Advice to Management

Listen to your employees - all of them.

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  1. Great Association

    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - District of Columbia in Washington, DC
    Former Employee - District of Columbia in Washington, DC

    I worked at SHRM full-time (More than 5 years)

    Recommends
    Recommends

    Pros

    Interesting work, great people, lots of growth

    Cons

    Really no cons that I can think of.


  2. Helpful (1)

    SHRM is an Employer of Choice

    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Manager, Compensation and Benefits in Alexandria, VA
    Current Employee - Manager, Compensation and Benefits in Alexandria, VA

    I have been working at SHRM full-time

    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    Pros

    I’ve been with the company for a little over 4 years and manage the organization’s compensation and benefits function. Having come from the “For Profit World” (Publically traded global organizations), I find the culture at SHRM refreshing and engaging. We do employees attitude survey’s throughout the year (I think twice a year) and management takes the results seriously and follows up with actions, not words. Examples include small lunches with senior management (SVPs) during an employee’s anniversary month, a CEO that walks the floors and knows most of our employees by name and a leadership team that asks the question: “How will this affect employees” when looking at making changes to our comp and benefit plans. I should also note that a portion of management’s incentive compensation is tied to employee attitude as measured in the employee attitude surveys. I find the work environment refreshing because I am given the freedom to take the initiative when I am looking to implement a new program or benefit, without a lot of bureaucracy. Examples include activities with regard to employee wellness such as health fairs with free flu shots, biometric screenings, fitness and yoga classes and lunch and learn seminars covering financial wellness. What surprised me most about this organization when I first started here is the level of engagement that management has with employees. In the 20+ years I’ve been a Comp and Benefits professional, I have not run across a company that enjoys the level of engagement that we do, let alone an organization that ties a component of incentive to providing a world class work environment.

    Cons

    Like the Human Resource profession we support and lead, HR is evolving we need to evolve with it to maintain our relevance within the profession and continue to lead it. This has led to a number of changes within SHRM that has conflicted with some of the legacy programs we have had here, and to opening new lines of businesses to further benefit our members, including the introduction of a competency based professional certification program. This has been a challenge for some employees (who have an average length of service of over 7 years) to adapt to. Rather than point to a lack of communication (which I do not believe exists, but is rather a perception of a minority of long service employees), I’d point to a culture of entitlement among these employees. Where most organizations have cut compensation and benefits over the last several years, SHRM has sought to maintain them (including a defined benefit pension plan), and in some cases, expand them (including wellness).

    Advice to Management

    I’m excited to be, not only an employee of SHRM, but also a member. The changes we are making now will benefit, not only our business, but more importantly our members and will continue to serve the profession I have been proud to be part of for 2 decades


There are newer employer reviews for SHRM
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