There are newer employer reviews for Save the Children

 

great opportunities, friendly and flexible working environment

  • Comp & Benefits
  • Work/Life Balance
  • Senior Management
  • Culture & Values
  • Career Opportunities
Current Employee - Director  in  Kabul (Afghanistan)
Current Employee - Director in Kabul (Afghanistan)

I have been working at Save the Children full-time for more than 3 years

Pros

Dedicated staff at the professional level

Cons

but also the staff good at talking and less

Advice to ManagementAdvice

carry on

Recommends
Positive Outlook
No opinion of CEO

55 Other Employee Reviews for Save the Children (View Most Recent)

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  1. 5 people found this helpful  

    Things Will Not Change until Top Management Changes

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I have been working at Save the Children full-time for more than 5 years

    Pros

    - build professional relationships with most of the people I work with;
    - flexibility of work schedule [usually] when there are emergencies with family/kids;

    Cons

    - it seems the finance department is a mess, there is a lack of leadership. When you have folks in management roles for 20-30 years, innovation and change go out the window - no, these aren't even allowed at the door. Many new people come in, but they are also the first to leave. Either these "lifers" need to switch to another department for a while or start an exchange program with other NGOs, to get some fresh blood in there, but nothing will change until the senior finance folks change - and sadly, it doesn't look like any of 'em will leave soon. Westport isn't exactly the HUB for NGOs, ya know. Forget it if you are a woman! The top finance folks will use the passive-agressive behaviour technique to force you out. You could have great ideas, but if the senior managers are the ones responsible for the idea: forget it. B-Level managers DO NOT hire A-level staff here. It's more like C-level managers though and they ain't hiring anyone who will outshine or outperform them.
    - Get rid of the conflicts of interest and nepotism. This ain't a family business. Husbands and wives working in the same department - come on. Uncles, cousins, sister-in-laws being hired or brought in from overseas? There are many many qualified Americans who can do the work.. Oh yeah, it makes it hard to have a disagreement with a co-worker if her husband is your boss: can you say conflict of interest????!!! Cut the nepotism and put a conflict of interest policy in place
    - Lack of transparency: people are given promotions or new positions without a new position being advertised. As for hiring, if you are in a clique, don't worry about applying for new positions because you can earn a new position even if you aren't qualified. you just have to be in the "clique."
    - Lack of follow up from HR when one interviews for a position. You usually find out from the Announcment Page when someone has been hired for a position for which you were interviewed. HR needs to get back to candidates BEFORE announcing who has been selected to fill a position.
    - Lack of direction with this whole Save the Children International thing - there has been such a lack of communication from mangement downwards; lack of planning; there are plans in place, but the senior management doesn't want to share with staff - like they feel empowered by holding information. Managers don't work with employees to get them into other positions (probably cause they are looking at protecting their own jobs)
    - Performance Evaluations - they have a quota of how many people can get each rating. So regardless of how highly your supervisor may think of your performance, if the senior managers don't want you to get a high rating, you ain't gonna get it. year after year, my supervisor comes back to apologize that his/her evaluation of me what rejected because the rating was too high.
    - Misuse of funds - when you see photos of children who look like they are starving, don't think all your donations reach them...there are $60,000 + vehicles being purchased for employee use to take their children to/fm the private schools or $4,200/month homes being rented, swimming pools that need to be cleaned; best thing is to designate your contributions to a specific cause

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Let the "lifers" those who've been there for 15 years + get some outside world experience or move them to another department.

    Cut the "bring your spouse/cousin/nephew/uncle/son" to work policy. They can come visit, but let one of them stay, not both. It's not good for morale, business.

    Have an open, transparent hiring/promotion practice. HR recruiters need to get back to candidates with solid feedback or honesty in terms of what a supervisor is looking for/why candidate not selected.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    No opinion of CEO
  2.  

    Absolutely Awsome

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I have been working at Save the Children as an intern for less than a year

    Pros

    From the people you are brought to work with, the enthusiasm generated by the job to the always exciting work to be done, Save the Children UK is a fantastic organisation to work for.

    Cons

    Probably the pay, as an intern.

    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO
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