Target

www.target.com
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1 person found this helpful  

Pleasant but frustrating at the same time

  • Comp & Benefits
  • Work/Life Balance
  • Senior Management
  • Culture & Values
  • Career Opportunities
Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
Current Employee - Anonymous Employee

I have been working at Target

Pros

The management team is usually flexible about working around other schedules, such as day care or school or whatever. Pay is ok and benefits are solid.

Cons

Working weekends and nights gets old really fast. Employee discount is 10% -- a pittance.

Advice to ManagementAdvice

Pay your employees more, recognize them more, reward them more. You need carrot and stick to move the ship forward, stick alone won't cut it.

Recommends
Neutral Outlook
No opinion of CEO

10028 Other Employee Reviews for Target (View Most Recent)

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  1.  

    Fun, Young, Energetic

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Business Analyst in Minneapolis, MN
    Current Employee - Business Analyst in Minneapolis, MN

    I have been working at Target full-time (less than a year)

    Pros

    The people are great, and you get a good mentor.
    The hours are reasonable, and the work can be exciting.

    Cons

    It's pretty cold in Minneapolis.
    You don't have too much say in what sector you'll be put into

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    You're doing great

    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO
  2. 3 people found this helpful  

    Best Company Ever?

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Presentation
    Current Employee - Presentation

    I have been working at Target full-time (more than 8 years)

    Pros

    #1. Target's edge in the retail trade is its observance of higher "guest" service standards. You will be the face of these higher standards, and you will get a feel for how ugly the American public can really be. If you are strong enough to deal with it and sensitive enough to learn from it, you will become a better person.
    #2. Retail is retail. There will always be drama brewing in every age group, people talking behind each others' backs and other random acts of trashiness. You may even encounter cruder acts of discreet favoritism and backstabbing. This is simply due to human nature, and has no place within Target policy. Overall, the atmosphere is convivial, and you should have no difficulty engaging in friendly banter with any of your managers, including the STL. (Store Manager)
    #3. Target has employee safety nets: "Best Team Survey", "Chat Sessions", and "Integrity Hot Line." Essentially, these are three ways you are allowed to rate the management team and Target as a corporation. The Best Team Survey is a once a year event, where you "anonymously" answer questions on a computer about how well the management team is doing and whether you like your job. Chat sessions are meetings in the conference room discussing the results of the survey with HR. The Integrity Hot Line is for team members who feel that they cannot approach a member of the management team with a specific issue, and wish to address the issue while retaining their anonymity so as not to be subject to managerial retribution. I have put these safety nets in the "Pros" category because given the right circumstances, I'm sure they have served the purpose they were created for. (You may have noticed the word anonymous in quotations earlier. Please read further for explanation.)
    #4. Hard work IS recognized. If you give 100%, choose to be "global" (train in different departments), and are cheerful, you will most likely be on the schedule full time (or as close to full time as payroll allows).
    #5. Fast, Fun, and Friendly events. Target's attempt at proliferating a happy atmosphere is to provide free BBQ's and lunches for team members during working hours, as well as giving you the opportunity to volunteer together at various charities and schools. These FFF events are nowhere near the quantity and quality that they were before this manufactured economy crisis, but they do still exist, and for that I give them credit.

    Cons

    #1. "Expect More, Pay Less"
    Unfortunately, Target's higher expectations for retail workers are not reflected in their pay. In fact, expectations over the last few years have risen dramatically, and even if you are given an outstanding yearly review, you will be lucky to add 25 cents an hour to your (minimum) wage. Perhaps that is good for today's standards, but the only reason I am making a liveable wage today is because of the dollar raises I was given prior to 2008 for excellent review scores. Since then, it has taken 4 years of raises to equal what I would have gotten in just one review, for the same score. Yes, the economy is different and times have changed, but the CEO is still raking it in by the millions and then running the company on a shoestring budget. If those who sit in their big leather chairs, smoking cigars in the boardroom were prepared to tuck in with the rest, I would have no problem with all of the cutbacks I have had to face in Targetland, but this is simply not the case. Target's number one priority is to report a profit on Wall Street while maintaining the comfort levels of the privileged few, and running stores on a skeleton crew is part of how they are able to pull that off. Managers and peons alike are expected to wear several hats under the pretense that they're only working to keep the lights on. The biggest consolation for doing what used to be the job of several people is the simple gratitude of being employed.
    #2. "Green=Good, Yellow=Bad, Red=Worse"
    Everything that transpires under the roof of a Target store is subject to rigid scoring and lofty goal setting. These color-coded metrics are actually not altogether impossible to meet. However, they can lead to frustrating situations. For example, guests may be constantly scoring your store as "red" when asked if there was adequate help on the sales floor. You are then forced to take personal responsibility for this failing metric, despite whether you've done everything you can do in that capacity. The obvious solution is proper staffing, but to point out the elephant in the living room is to be labeled a rotten apple. The frenzy created over "green" scores only serves to exacerbate the frustration one begins to feel when they are expected to be everywhere at once.
    As far as managerial goal setting is concerned, it can be somewhat of a psychological game. For instance, the actual goal may be 10 but they tell everyone that the goal is 20, and end up with a result of 15 plus a pat on the back from their superiors. For those underlings smart enough to figure it out, it's a bit patronizing.
    #3. "Recognition"
    Target's culture of team recognition is voluntary, but forced from a corporate level at the same time. This causes the same amount of praise to be given whether you've saved a life or squashed a bug, and thus becomes negative reinforcement.
    #4. "Safety Nets"
    The reason I put the word anonymous in quotations above is because of the way in which the Best Team Survey is conducted. To begin the survey, you must select your work center. If you are like me and only have two or three people in your work center, HR doesn't have to be a rocket scientist to know who said what.
    Regarding the Integrity Hot Line, I advise dealing with people face to face. Your anonymity is not actually guaranteed, and you may find yourself in the Store Team Lead's office explaining the details of your phone call and why you chose to call instead of coming to them.
    #5. "Management Material"
    The sad truth is that there is not one Team Lead, LOD, ETL or STL that can stand on their own two feet and say that people follow their decisions. They were hired based on the college degrees they possess, and how malleable they are to follow and implement Target's ever changing corporate master plan. That is why Target's management team largely consists of a rotating staff of fresh college graduates who have been recruited to become an "ETL" (Executive Team Lead) at a fraction of the pay given to those with experience who formerly held the position. You may find yourself taking orders from them one day, and training them on how to do your job the next. The furthest you can progress without a college degree is Senior Team Lead, which is a fancy title for Dogsbody. I find it deplorable that Target has caved to a system where a piece of paper that one may have squeaked through college to obtain holds more weight than years of dedication and concrete merit.
    #7. "Volunteer Events"
    If I donated three million dollars to St. Jude's and then bragged about it, you could rest assured that I care more about the accolades than the children. Target has a quota to meet regarding volunteer events, and one of the Team Leads is often elected captain of maintaining it. The work is done by altruistic team members, while the Target Corporation proclaims their 'goodness' to the world in hopes of increased sales.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Dear Target, you can't have your cake and eat it too. Minimum wage for minimum effort, or better pay for better work.

    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO
There are newer employer reviews for Target

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