Target

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1 person found this helpful  

Something to get when searching for a better job

  • Comp & Benefits
  • Work/Life Balance
  • Senior Management
  • Culture & Values
  • Career Opportunities
Former Employee - Target Back Room Team Member in Fayetteville, NC
Former Employee - Target Back Room Team Member in Fayetteville, NC

I worked at Target part-time (less than an year)

Pros

I could be late up to 7 mins everyday and keep my job. I had a very good team that trained me well.

Cons

Never could get enough hours to support a family, the average weekly hours got was 18-20. there was never room for advancement.

Doesn't Recommend
No opinion of CEO

9618 Other Employee Reviews for Target (View Most Recent)

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  1. 3 people found this helpful  

    If you don't mind being back in high school....

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in Minneapolis, MN
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in Minneapolis, MN

    I worked at Target full-time (more than 5 years)

    Pros

    Good pay, regular raises, mostly friendly employees, fair benefits, good 401K, good perks

    Cons

    This is definitely a workplace that values extroverts; I was called out many times for not talking enough in meetings and not leading. Which is funny because I have been a captain of sports, dance, leader of girl scouts, tutor, stage manager, etc., which all require leadership. This has been the only place where I have been called out for my lack of leadership. The way I see it, we're in meetings with 10 other people who love to hear themselves speak, whether it is just repeating the same stuff over and over or chatting about things that don't apply to the whole group. I didn't want to be one more voice speaking just to get acknowledgement of participating.
    Caste system at work: non-exempt (hourly) vs. exempt (salaried) employees. Non-exempt get treated like worker bees - need permission to stay on the clock while doing their ceaseless mandatory "fun" outings/activities. Other times you can punch out and participate, but you'll need to try to make up your hours later.
    All meetings and no action; everyone talks and reiterates everything at meetings and you just come away with things to look into; not much actionable.
    Their "fun" activities are annoyingly frequent; especially with a growing workload; I know many people who would have to stay late to get all their work done when they were required to participate in Fast, Fun and Friendly activities.
    There are so many people touching each part of the work that do not communicate with the other, that there is a lot of redundancies and double-work. For such a huge company, their lack of communication is startling. Also, they rely way too much on other companies they work with for organizing their assets. When I worked here, it was a huge task to find the latest version of the projects that we were working on.
    With a huge number of working mothers in the company, one of the main reasons I left was their lack of flexibility with telecommuting. My job was fully able to be telecommute-friendly at a regular schedule, but they are obsessed with "face time" (which always felt more like wasted time) and being in your seat and putting on a show. I always have been able to get much more done at my new job with 50% of it being telecommuted but the work is not Target's priority. The image you project is more important that actual work at Target (which is often reflected in their choice of managers and who gets promoted - there were many incompetent managers who kept getting promoted up and up).

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Organize and cut out the fat. If you need to have different levels of employees (exempt vs. non-exempt) make sure that you include the non-exempt in those "fun" activities without having to sacrifice pay.
    Stop with all the "fun" activities, change to a reasonable level and not mandatory - kind of takes the fun out of it if you have to be there.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO
  2. 6 people found this helpful  

    Company heading in the wrong direction...

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Executive Team Leader in Pittsburgh, PA
    Current Employee - Executive Team Leader in Pittsburgh, PA

    I have been working at Target full-time (more than 5 years)

    Pros

    The pay offered to a college student coming right out of school is higher than most companies pay. The 401k match is higher than most companies pay. You will get a lot of leadership experience, however, once you are pigeonholed into retail it is hard to break out of it, so unless this is a career you want to continue for the rest of your life, make sure you set a timeline for yourself as to when to get out.

    Cons

    Work-Life balance has taken a huge hit over the past 12 months. Sales in the company overall have been on a decline, and as a result, payroll in the stores has dramatically decreased, leaving the salaried Executive Team Leaders to pick up the slack. I have been with the company for six years, and at this point I am not longer exercising my leadership - I am physically working on setting transitions, unloading trucks, cashiering, bringing carts in the building, etc. When you are hired they set the 50 hour week standard with you, which seems reasonable for the amount you will be getting paid, however, it is pretty rare that you will actually only work 50 hours. I would say on average I am clocking 60 hours a week in a low volume store.

    When Target presents the position to new candidates, they do not portray a realistic job description. I would say I spend about 40% of my week crushing cardboard in a baler and crushing garbage in a compactor. Additionally, it is expected that you are on the floor interacting with guests pretty much 90% of your day, which makes it difficult to complete any administrative work that you may have.

    The overall culture and morale of the company has been on a decline. With the headcount reduction that they took at the beginning of the year, it has all of the team leaders in stores with excess headcount scared for their jobs. At this point, store team leaders are literally using the corrective action process for anything they can, which has never been done in the past. Being in a store where the headcount was reduced by 7 positions that were eliminated, I have been a part of succession planning. It is basically like making a hit list for employees that have performed well, but that need to go because it is expected that we reach this headcount by September. The morale is also impacted by the lack of communication stores receive from HQ. A lot of times the strategies the company is rolling out are not communicated in a timely manner, or are conflicting. In the aftermath of the credit card saga, stores were receiving conflicting information on almost a daily basis due to Target's desire to win back the guests.

    Training for ETL positions is seriously lacking. You receive 6 weeks of training, which is nowhere near what is needed for the position. Being a trainer myself, I have often worked with my STL to visit my trainees stores with them to extend the training an additional week or so. The one position in my current store has going through 6 ETLs in the last 4 years because they are not being trained properly and become frustrated and disengaged once they are actually in role.

    My advice to anyone going into an Executive Team Leader position is to be vocal and try to get into either Logistics or Human Resources. I think those are the two safest positions from a headcount reduction standpoint (I have seen this happen twice in the 6 years I've been with the company), and those are the two positions that will allow you to move out of the company and have the best opportunities. In my opinion, if you are a sales floor ETL, you will be stuck in retail for the rest of your career because you will not have any other experience.

    My real advice to anyone would be to pass up the opportunity - the money is not worth the hours you will put in and the lack of professional experience you will receive. However, I cannot say that Target is a terrible company to work for - it has just seen better days.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Take a deeper look at who is being placed in store leadership positions. When I first started with the company, development was truly a focus, and now at this point the store team leaders are only focused on metrics and where they rank within their districts. I have seen a lot of great leaders leave the company, and have not seen leaders of the same caliber take their place. In the market I am in, there are a lot of STLs taking over that have only held one position and don't know anything about Logistics or HR, which makes it difficult for new leaders on-boarding.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    No opinion of CEO
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