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Satisfactory

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  • Senior Management
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Former Employee - Anonymous Employee  in  Dublin, Dublin (Ireland)
Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in Dublin, Dublin (Ireland)

I worked at Trinity College Dublin

Pros

Reputation, networking, diversity, experience, opportunities for further development

Cons

Really depends on the Department/School. Some are extremely inflexible, resist ANY change or improvements, and rarely hire young professionals

Recommends

Other Reviews for Trinity College Dublin

  1.  

    Important to broaden my knowledge

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee  in  Dublin, Dublin (Ireland)
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in Dublin, Dublin (Ireland)

    I worked at Trinity College Dublin

    Pros

    Best and most recognised college in Ireland,
    campus is in the city centre of Dublin,
    connected with other colleges around the world,
    scientific personnel high qualified

    Cons

    Connection with industry is poor,
    difficulty to get grants or private investors,
    some difficulties are present on the communication between different departments

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Develop a better network between industry and college with new projects that might interest the industry.
    Develop research within different department

    Recommends
  2.  

    Short-term contract roles offer no prospects, no security and no real incentives

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Research Assistant  in  Dublin, Dublin (Ireland)
    Former Employee - Research Assistant in Dublin, Dublin (Ireland)

    I worked at Trinity College Dublin

    Pros

    Projects are small (research, pre-startup type of work, usually less then five people) so there's a wide range of stuff to tackle and be exposed to.

    There's often enormous freedom in choosing work topics, times, tools and approaches.

    The objective is to get the job done right, not bill for hours spent or to get something shipped, and you can often publish your work publicly.

    *If* you are fortunate and your PI or supervisor is good, it can be very intellectually rewarding, or financially (Havok, Iona and others all spun out of TCD).

    Cons

    There aren't many good PIs or supervisors. And a bad one will lead to a lot of mental stress from very poor management skills, technical skills, even basic people skills.

    Contracts are usually for less than two years, and job security or prospects for academic careers are currently nonexistant and that's unlikely to change in the coming decade thanks to government policy, budget cuts and basic maths (tenure track posts are few and oversubscribed by several orders of magnitude).

    Things you would normally take as granted as being banned by HR are rife. Work/life balance is nonexistant, and it is expected that you will accept this.

    Pay is lower than the private sector to start; if you're doing a PhD you're on a stipend of less than €15k per annum and *may not* earn more than that or you lose the stipend. If you're on contract, your pay is docked by public sector pay levies and pension levies even though you have no job security which is the usual compensation for those levies.

    If you are expecting equity deals or the like for a spin-out, you need to get that in writing well ahead of time. College policy will not back contract employees over staff in the event of dispute.

    The mental paradigm of PhD students being serfs to academics, and the newer paradigm of contract researchers being vassals of the department, are both rife amongst some sectors of the college, though a good PI or supervisor will not subscribe to those paradigms. Hopefully.

    Internecine politics is rife at all organisational levels from the board on down to individual academics, and in a wide range of severities.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Make basic project management courses mandatory for all academics supervising projects or students.

    Give courses for prospective new students/contractors to explain what may go wrong and how to avoid pitfalls.

    Change the culture, fundamentally.

    Doesn't Recommend
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