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1 person found this helpful  

Fund Manager

  • Comp & Benefits
  • Work/Life Balance
  • Senior Management
  • Culture & Values
  • Career Opportunities
Current Employee - Fund Manager  in  Los Angeles, CA
Current Employee - Fund Manager in Los Angeles, CA

I have been working at UCLA Health full-time for less than a year

Pros

-Flexible hours - some departments offer 4/40 (work 10 hours per day and get one day off per week) or 9/80 schedule (work 9 hours per day and get one day off every 2 weeks)
- Many campus activities provided to employee to promote wellness (free yoga, i heart walking, BHIP program, etc.)
- Compared to many corporation, you barely need to work overtime
- Great benefit and paid holiday (campus closure during christmas most departments are closed for a week or so)
- Great training center (they provide all classes for you to learn the system, policies, and even excel and access classes)
- Many advancement opportunities from department to department

Cons

- Constantly changing system and procedures without notice and no one has an answer or take the responsibility
- Different departments have different standards and procedures
- Increase in pay is very difficult and it could take 6-8 months until it's approved

Advice to ManagementAdvice

Please think through all possible technical problems when converting to a new system. Send out employee survey and ask our opinions. Many management do not understand the front line problems that we are facing.

Recommends
Positive Outlook

81 Other Employee Reviews for UCLA Health (View Most Recent)

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  1.  

    Potential to advance is limitless.

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Current Employee - Benefit Analyst  in  Los Angeles, CA
    Current Employee - Benefit Analyst in Los Angeles, CA

    I have been working at UCLA Health full-time for less than a year

    Pros

    Excellent Benefits and Uniforms have been implemented.
    Close to LAX.

    Cons

    Parking is Expensive and there is no street parking.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Move a bit more quickly.

    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
  2. 2 people found this helpful  

    Disrespectful, uncooperative and ineffective leadership

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee  in  Los Angeles, CA
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in Los Angeles, CA

    I worked at UCLA Health full-time for less than a year

    Pros

    I was in an administrative position at UCLA Health and I was shocked at the level of office politics and lack of effective leadership in the company. If I could give this organization zero stars, I would. The only positive thing that I have to say is that every department in the UCLA Health System seems very different. Other departments may have a better culture and system for new hires.

    Cons

    1. Lack of leadership (the senior director of my group stayed at work till 10 pm when there are no major deliverables (and this person gets in at 8 AM), is constantly stressed out, and releases stress on everyone else in the group)
    2. A small group of mean spirited executives and directors appear to control the group and if you aren't part of their group or following their rules, you probably won't be at the organization very long
    3. Culture of fear set from management
    4. Unclear performance goals
    5. No feedback from management
    6. Absolutely no training from direct managers or teammates
    7. Terrible office space (my office used to be a closet and could not fit more that one chair in it.)
    8. Lack of camaraderie. (Teammates stopped helping me after my second day on the job and told my manager that they have his own work to do so I had no one to answer my questions).
    9. Lots of office gossip and lack of maturity among leadership. (I would find out later that my manager spoke ill of me to my colleagues.)
    10. Disrespect for young risers in managerial roles
    11. No work/life balance (I would get e-mails on a Sunday and respond to them right away. Also, my manager would set up meetings for 6:30 PM. There was no respect for my time. My manager would stop at another employee's office and chat with that person till 7:30 PM before coming to my office. And our meeting was regarding a very important deliverable to submit the next day.)
    12. Six month probationary period (meaning that you can not take any days off for 6 months and you can be laid off anytime before then or not extended after 6 months)
    13. No formal kitchens in the building. Closets are transformed to include mini fridges, water coolers, and small coffee makers for "kitchens" (this is for the departments in the Geffen SOM/CHS/Jules Stein building)
    14. Everyone had their office doors closed and was not easily accessible. The office space felt like a deserted building and leadership was very unapproachable.
    15. Very little communication between new hire and their direct manager.
    16. Many of the executives and directors had over 10 years of experience in the UCLA system and expected everyone to have an expert understanding of UCLA systems and processes right away including new UCLA hires. This simply is not realistic. New UCLA hires need more than 5 days to understand UCLA systems and processes. This is true for any company.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Significant changes need to occur to create a cohesive and unified culture. I definitely did not feel part of the team when I was at the organization. I believe that the lack of management and zero emphasis on a positive culture has created such a dysfunctional administrative group. Some important aspects to fix are as follows:

    1. Engage the new hire and practice constant communication. Don't just say it, actually do it.
    2. Set performance goals and targets. Create a feedback loop.
    3. If you are stressed out, act professional and do not show it to those you manage.
    4. Be positive and surround yourself with positive people that have diverse experiences.
    5. Encourage teamwork. Make training new hires and others part of an employees annual goals.
    6. Be open to diverse perspectives and give new hires time to understand UCLA systems and processes.
    7. Find a way to better balance your work and personal obligations. Set an example for your team.

    I can go on with this list...I'm not sure if it will make a difference. I have a feeling that this group is pretty set in its ways and will not change.

    Doesn't Recommend
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