US Postal Service

www.usps.com
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2 people found this helpful  

Totally Abusive Environment

  • Comp & Benefits
  • Work/Life Balance
  • Senior Management
  • Culture & Values
  • Career Opportunities
Former Employee - Casual Mail Handler in Bell Gardens, CA
Former Employee - Casual Mail Handler in Bell Gardens, CA

I worked at US Postal Service as a contractor (less than a year)

Pros

The Paycheck! That's if they'll give it to me.

Cons

Micromanagement, Constantly Harassed, Negative Environment. Always being harassed - supervisor saying "go faster", angry bitter co-worker putting her hands on me, another supervisor yelling at me. I could go on but what's the point.

Advice to ManagementAdvice

Gut this place down to the bolts, start over and get better management. For this to be a Government entity, it is the most depressing, abusive environment I've ever worked for. They fired me on 6/13/13 and I still haven't received my final paycheck. Called everyone short of head guy and they do nothing but make excuses.

Doesn't Recommend
Negative Outlook
Disapproves of CEO

1494 Other Employee Reviews for US Postal Service (View Most Recent)

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  1. 2 people found this helpful  

    The United States Postal Service... no different than the Mafia

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - Rural Carrier Associate in Renville, MN
    Former Employee - Rural Carrier Associate in Renville, MN

    I worked at US Postal Service part-time (more than 3 years)

    Pros

    If you are given full-time work, consider yourself a choosen one. And if you are a choosen one, you are living it up financially and beneficially.

    Cons

    Where do I begin? There are so many different jobs within the USPS it is ridiculous. But if you work at a postal service in rural America, the jobs consist of Post Masters, City Carriers, Letter Carriers, Clerks, and Rural Carriers. As for me, I was hired on as a Rural Carrier Associate. What a great euphomism for a part time job, right? When you think of part time jobs, one might think you are only working 20 hours a week. That's not the case as an RCA. You will be lucky to work once a month. And if your route is 120+ miles where you have to learn the rural route inside and out, in addition to getting the mail sorted within less than 2 hours, then your first year as an RCA will be extremely overwhelming! How can the USPS expect someone to fill in and be successful at this job?
    I was hired on as an RCA in 2008. My interview was done by two Post Masters, and the one who was in charge of the interview was not even the Post Master of that office. He balantantly told me that within less than one year of service I would be given full time status as a Rural Carrier. I had no more questions to ask him because I already knew what great benefits and income they receive. Funny tho, the interview continued on for almost 2 more hours. Weird.
    I didn't receive a full time position after one year working for them, and I have a BA in Political Science along with a extensive resume that consists of working all over the United States of America. I continued working for a total of 4 years and still did not get a full time job. I even worked at 2 different post offices and still could not make it financially. I also tried to apply with the US Postal Inpection Service (the law enforcement of the USPS), since they require a 4 year degree, but for some reason they where not hiring. I guess I didn't have the right connections.
    What's even more stressful is how the USPS expects you to leave another job that you have on the side to come work for them when they need you. If you don't come work them, they will threaten to get rid of you.
    Another stress with the job is when the full time rural carrier that you sub for is a farmer who has 2,000+ acres of land, farming corn, soybeans, and sugarbeats. Why does a farmer with that much land need a full time position with the USPS? It's obvious that he is taking advantages of the benefits so that it didn't dip into his $500,000.00 farm income. Ah, yeah, that's a half a million dollars to those who aren't good in math.
    I would recommend that if you are a farmer and want to make extra income or just want to get away from your farm life, go work for the USPS. If you are not a farmer, stay clear from the USPS. Oh, and as a part timer, you get no benefits until you are hired full time.
    But if you are willing to wait 10+ years to get a full time position, then sign up for the USPS! You will have to take the USPS Battery Exam test, and if you do well in that, hopefully you will get a call from a post office within 30-45 miles from where you live for an interview. And if you succeed in your interview, you will be expected to take a drug test. After everything is completed, you get about 2 weeks of OJT (on the job training) to learn your rural route and how to sort the mail. Hopefully you have a photographic memory, because if you don't, you will be extremely stressed for the first year.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    I only have one advice for management--don't lie to your future employees about getting full time status in a certain time limit. Be honest! Tell your interviewee that the only way to get full time status is when someone retires and they are next in line the get that position. And to be quite honest with you, that's not even the case, for someone else from another post office who has more seniority has a better opportunity to get that full time position. But the key is to be honest. You "choosen ones" already are reaping the benefits and finances from whatever position you have within the USPS as long as you are full time. And as long as you practice HONESTY, the chances of employees going postal on you are slim to none.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO
  2. 3 people found this helpful  

    Horrible work environment

    • Comp & Benefits
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Senior Management
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    Former Employee - City Carrier Assistant in Torrance, CA
    Former Employee - City Carrier Assistant in Torrance, CA

    I worked at US Postal Service as a contractor (less than a year)

    Pros

    You get to be outdoors;
    You work alone;
    You get to interact with a variety of people on a daily bases;
    Making people happy when they see the mail carrier coming, especially children

    Cons

    The managers can be cruel and inhumane. I see how the term 'going postal' came to play working in such an environment. They talk to you like crap and treat you the same. You get overworked and then criticized for not working fast enough. They expect you to skip lunches in order to meet their 'time' all while you are out walking for 5-6 hours at a time. I was told to take my lunch after I pass my 90 day probation.

    You will get clocked out by the managers if you go over the time they want you on the clock..

    This job & it's $15/hr pay isn't worth the stress, the health risks, and the headaches it causes.

    Advice to ManagementAdvice

    Learn how to manage and have effective working relationships with the staff.

    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    No opinion of CEO
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